|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Collison, F.M.; Poe, K.
Title “Astronomical Tourism”: The Astronomy and Dark Sky Program at Bryce Canyon National Park Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Tourism Management Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Tourism Management Perspectives
Volume 7 Issue Pages 1-15
Keywords Astronomy-related tourism; National parks; Night sky darkness; astrotourism; dark skies
Abstract Astronomical tourism represents a less-studied segment of sustainable tourism, where a dark night sky is the underlying resource. This article evaluates an astronomical tourism program, in this case at a national park with dark skies for observing. Bryce Canyon National Park (BCNP) in the southwestern United States has a well-developed astronomy program to serve visitors. The program consists of solar viewing during the day, multimedia evening programs, and night-time star gazing with telescopes. Depending on the specific measure used, it appears that up to 10% of park visitors may be involved with the formal Astronomy and Dark Sky Program and/or more informal astronomy activities. BCNP appears well positioned to take advantage of the dark sky attributes of the park and to educate visitors about the importance of maintaining and/or increasing the darkness of night skies. Potential future developments in the program may serve to further increase the number of visitors to BCNP.
Address School of Travel Industry Management, 1901 Ruby Lane, Liberty, MO 64068; collison(at)hawaii.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2211-9736 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 128
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E.
Title Adverse health effects of nighttime lighting: comments on American Medical Association policy statement Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication American Journal of Preventive Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Prev Med
Volume 45 Issue 3 Pages 343-346
Keywords American Medical Association; Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; DNA Damage/physiology; *Health Policy; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; United States
Abstract The American Medical Association House of Delegates in June of 2012 adopted a policy statement on nighttime lighting and human health. This major policy statement summarizes the scientific evidence that nighttime electric light can disrupt circadian rhythms in humans and documents the rapidly advancing understanding from basic science of how disruption of circadian rhythmicity affects aspects of physiology with direct links to human health, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and metabolism. The human evidence is also accumulating, with the strongest epidemiologic support for a link of circadian disruption from light at night to breast cancer. There are practical implications of the basic and epidemiologic science in the form of advancing lighting technologies that better accommodate human circadian rhythmicity.
Address University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0749-3797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23953362 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 130
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reddy, A.B.; O'Neill, J.S.
Title Healthy clocks, healthy body, healthy mind Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Trends in Cell Biology Abbreviated Journal Trends Cell Biol
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 36-44
Keywords Aging; Animals; Cell Cycle; *Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism; Signal Transduction
Abstract Circadian rhythms permeate mammalian biology. They are manifested in the temporal organisation of behavioural, physiological, cellular and neuronal processes. Whereas it has been shown recently that these approximately 24-hour cycles are intrinsic to the cell and persist in vitro, internal synchrony in mammals is largely governed by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei that facilitate anticipation of, and adaptation to, the solar cycle. Our timekeeping mechanism is deeply embedded in cell function and is modelled as a network of transcriptional and/or post-translational feedback loops. Concurrent with this, we are beginning to understand how this ancient timekeeper interacts with myriad cell systems, including signal transduction cascades and the cell cycle, and thus impacts on disease. An exemplary area where this knowledge is rapidly expanding and contributing to novel therapies is cancer, where the Period genes have been identified as tumour suppressors. In more complex disorders, where aetiology remains controversial, interactions with the clockwork are only now starting to be appreciated.
Address Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge CB2 OQQ, UK. abr20@cam.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8924 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19926479; PMCID:PMC2808409 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 133
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kantermann, T.; Roenneberg, T.
Title Is light-at-night a health risk factor or a health risk predictor? Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 1069-1074
Keywords *Chronobiology Disorders; Circadian Rhythm; Environmental Exposure; Humans; *Light; Neoplasms; Risk Factors
Abstract In 2007, the IARC (WHO) has classified “shift-work that involves circadian disruption” as potentially carcinogenic. Ample evidence leaves no doubt that shift-work is detrimental for health, but the mechanisms behind this effect are not well understood. The hormone melatonin is often considered to be a causal link between night shift and tumor development. The underlying “light-at-night” (LAN) hypothesis is based on the following chain of arguments: melatonin is a hormone produced under the control of the circadian clock at night, and its synthesis can be suppressed by light; as an indolamine, it potentially acts as a scavenger of oxygen radicals, which in turn can damage DNA, which in turn can cause cancer. Although there is no experimental evidence that LAN is at the basis of increased cancer rates in shiftworkers, the scenario “light at night can cause cancer” influences research, medicine, the lighting industry and (via the media) also the general public, well beyond shiftwork. It is even suggested that baby-lights, TVs, computers, streetlights, moonlight, emergency lights, or any so-called “light pollution” by urban developments cause cancer via the mechanisms proposed by the LAN hypothesis. Our commentary addresses the growing concern surrounding light pollution. We revisit the arguments of the LAN theory and put them into perspective regarding circadian physiology, physical likelihood (e.g., what intensities reach the retina), and potential risks, specifically in non-shiftworkers.
Address Institute for Medical Psychology, University of Munich LMU, Munich, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19731106 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 134
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kavcic, P.; Rojc, B.; Dolenc-Groselj, L.; Claustrat, B.; Fujs, K.; Poljak, M.
Title The impact of sleep deprivation and nighttime light exposure on clock gene expression in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Croatian Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Croat Med J
Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 594-603
Keywords genomics; epigenetics; hPer2; hBmal1; clock genes; gene expression; biology; human health
Abstract Aim

To examine the effect of acute sleep deprivation under light conditions on the expression of two key clock genes, hPer2 and hBmal1, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on plasma melatonin and cortisol levels.

Methods

Blood samples were drawn from 6 healthy individuals at 4-hour intervals for three consecutive nights, including a night of total sleep deprivation (second night). The study was conducted in April-June 2006 at the University Medical Centre Ljubljana.

Results

We found a significant diurnal variation in hPer2 and hBmal1 expression levels under baseline (P < 0.001, F = 19.7, df = 30 for hPer2 and P < 0.001, F = 17.6, df = 30 for hBmal1) and sleep-deprived conditions (P < 0.001, F = 9.2, df = 30 for hPer2 and P < 0.001, F = 13.2, df = 30 for hBmal1). Statistical analysis with the single cosinor method revealed circadian variation of hPer2 under baseline and of hBmal1 under baseline and sleep-deprived conditions. The peak expression of hPer2 was at 13:55 ± 1:15 hours under baseline conditions and of hBmal1 at 16:08 ± 1:18 hours under baseline and at 17:13 ± 1:35 hours under sleep-deprived conditions. Individual cosinor analysis of hPer2 revealed a loss of circadian rhythm in 3 participants and a phase shift in 2 participants under sleep-deprived conditions. The plasma melatonin and cortisol rhythms confirmed a conventional alignment of the central circadian pacemaker to the habitual sleep/wake schedule.

Conclusion

Our results suggest that 40-hour acute sleep deprivation under light conditions may affect the expression of hPer2 in PBMCs.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0353-9504 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 135
Permanent link to this record