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Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E.
Title Breast cancer and circadian disruption from electric lighting in the modern world Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication CA: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians Abbreviated Journal CA Cancer J Clin
Volume 64 Issue 3 Pages 207-218
Keywords breast neoplasms; circadian clock; melatonin production; shift work; sleep duration; oncogenesis
Abstract Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide, and there is only a limited explanation of why. Risk is highest in the most industrialized countries but also is rising rapidly in the developing world. Known risk factors account for only a portion of the incidence in the high-risk populations, and there has been considerable speculation and many false leads on other possibly major determinants of risk, such as dietary fat. A hallmark of industrialization is the increasing use of electricity to light the night, both within the home and without. It has only recently become clear that this evolutionarily new and, thereby, unnatural exposure can disrupt human circadian rhythmicity, of which three salient features are melatonin production, sleep, and the circadian clock. A convergence of research in cells, rodents, and humans suggests that the health consequences of circadian disruption may be substantial. An innovative experimental model has shown that light at night markedly increases the growth of human breast cancer xenografts in rats. In humans, the theory that light exposure at night increases breast cancer risk leads to specific predictions that are being tested epidemiologically: evidence has accumulated on risk in shift workers, risk in blind women, and the impact of sleep duration on risk. If electric light at night does explain a portion of the breast cancer burden, then there are practical interventions that can be implemented, including more selective use of light and the adoption of recent advances in lighting technology and application. CA Cancer J Clin 2014;64:207-218. ((c)) 2013 American Cancer Society.
Address Professor, Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT
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ISSN 0007-9235 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24604162; PMCID:PMC4038658 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 155
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Author Hansen, J.; Lassen, C.F.
Title Nested case-control study of night shift work and breast cancer risk among women in the Danish military Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Occup Environ Med
Volume 69 Issue 8 Pages 551-556
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Denmark/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Middle Aged; Military Personnel; *Occupations; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; *Sunlight; *Work; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis
Abstract OBJECTIVES: Growing but limited evidence suggests that night shift work is associated with breast cancer. The authors conducted a nationwide case-control study nested within a cohort of 18,551 female military employees born in 1929-1968 to investigate the risk for breast cancer after night shift work and to explore the role of leisure time sun exposure and diurnal preference. METHODS: The authors documented 218 cases of breast cancer (1990-2003) and selected 899 age-matched controls from the cohort by incidence density sampling. Information on shift work, sun exposure habits, diurnal preference and other potential confounders was obtained from a structured questionnaire. ORs were estimated by multivariate conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, the authors observed an adjusted OR of 1.4 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.1) among women with ever compared with never night shifts. The RR for breast cancer tended to increase with increasing number of years of night shift work (p=0.03) and with cumulative number of shifts (p=0.02),with a neutral risk for fewer than three night shifts per week. The OR for the group with the highest tertile of cumulative exposure was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.6). The most pronounced effect of night shift work on breast cancer risk was observed in women with morning chronotype preference and intense night shifts (OR=3.9, 95% CI 1.6 to 9.5). Night shift workers tended to sunbathe more frequently than day workers. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that frequent night shift work increases the risk for breast cancer and suggest a higher risk with longer duration of intense night shifts. Women with morning preference who worked on night shifts tended to have a higher risk than those with evening preference.
Address Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, Copenhagen DK2100, Denmark. johnni@cancer.dk
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ISSN 1351-0711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22645325 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 156
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Author Haus, E.L.; Smolensky, M.H.
Title Shift work and cancer risk: potential mechanistic roles of circadian disruption, light at night, and sleep deprivation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med Rev
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 273-284
Keywords Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Epigenesis, Genetic/physiology; Humans; Light; Melatonin/physiology; Neoplasms/*etiology; Risk Factors; Sleep Deprivation/*complications; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology; oncogenesis
Abstract Shift work that includes a nighttime rotation has become an unavoidable attribute of today's 24-h society. The related disruption of the human circadian time organization leads in the short-term to an array of jet-lag-like symptoms, and in the long-run it may contribute to weight gain/obesity, metabolic syndrome/type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic studies also suggest increased cancer risk, especially for breast cancer, in night and rotating female shift workers. If confirmed in more controlled and detailed studies, the carcinogenic effect of night and shift work will constitute additional serious medical, economic, and social problems for a substantial proportion of the working population. Here, we examine the possible multiple and interconnected cancer-promoting mechanisms as a consequence of shift work, i.e., repeated disruption of the circadian system, pineal hormone melatonin suppression by exposure to light at night, sleep-deprivation-caused impairment of the immune system, plus metabolic changes favoring obesity and generation of proinflammatory reactive oxygen species.
Address Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, University of Minnesota and Health Partners Medical Group, Regions Hospital, 640 Jackson Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 55101, USA. Erhard.X.Haus@HealthPartners.com
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ISSN 1087-0792 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:23137527 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 157
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Author Parent, M.-E.; El-Zein, M.; Rousseau, M.-C.; Pintos, J.; Siemiatycki, J.
Title Night work and the risk of cancer among men Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol
Volume 176 Issue 9 Pages 751-759
Keywords Adult; Aged; *Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Male; *Men's Health; Middle Aged; Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Occupations/*statistics & numerical data; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/*statistics & numerical data; Quebec/epidemiology; Risk Factors; oncogenesis
Abstract Night work might influence cancer risk, possibly via suppression of melatonin release. In a population-based case-control study conducted in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, between 1979 and 1985, job histories, including work hours, were elicited from 3,137 males with incident cancer at one of 11 anatomic sites and from 512 controls. Compared with men who never worked at night, the adjusted odds ratios among men who ever worked at night were 1.76 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25, 2.47) for lung cancer, 2.03 (95% CI: 1.43, 2.89) for colon cancer, 1.74 (95% CI: 1.22, 2.49) for bladder cancer, 2.77 (95% CI: 1.96, 3.92) for prostate cancer, 2.09 (95% CI: 1.40, 3.14) for rectal cancer, 2.27 (95% CI: 1.24, 4.15) for pancreatic cancer, and 2.31 (95% CI: 1.48, 3.61) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Equivocal evidence or no evidence was observed for cancers of the stomach (odds ratio (OR) = 1.34, 95% CI: 0.85, 2.10), kidney (OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 0.86, 2.35), and esophagus (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.80, 2.84) and for melanoma (OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.49, 2.22). There was no evidence of increasing risk with increasing duration of night work, with risks generally being increased across all duration categories. Results suggest that night work may increase cancer risk at several sites among men.
Address INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, University of Quebec, Laval, Canada. marie-elise.parent@iaf.inrs.ca
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ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23035019 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 158
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Author Peplonska, B.; Bukowska, A.; Sobala, W.; Reszka, E.; Gromadzinska, J.; Wasowicz, W.; Lie, J.A.; Kjuus, H.; Ursin, G.
Title Rotating night shift work and mammographic density Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume 21 Issue 7 Pages 1028-1037
Keywords Adult; Breast/*pathology; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology/*pathology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Melatonin/urine; Middle Aged; *Midwifery; *Nursing Staff; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis
Abstract BACKGROUND: An increased risk of breast cancer has been observed in night shift workers. Exposure to artificial light at night and disruption of the endogenous circadian rhythm with suppression of the melatonin synthesis have been suggested mechanisms. We investigated the hypothesis that rotating night shift work is associated with mammographic density. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study on the association between rotating night shift work characteristics, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (MT6s) creatinine adjusted in a spot morning urine sample, and a computer-assisted measure of mammographic density in 640 nurses and midwives ages 40 to 60 years. The associations were evaluated using regression models adjusted for age, body mass index, menopausal status, age at menopause, age at menarche, smoking, and the calendar season of the year when mammography was conducted. RESULTS: The adjusted means of percentage of mammographic density and absolute density were slightly higher among women working rotating night shifts but not statistically significant [percentage of mammographic density = 23.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 21.9%-25.4% vs. 22.5%, 95% CI, 20.8%-24.3%; absolute density = 23.9 cm(2), 95% CI, 21.4-26.4 cm(2) vs. 21.8 cm(2), 95% CI, 19.4-24.3 cm(2) in rotating night shift and day shift nurses, respectively). There were no significant associations between the current or cumulative rotating night shift work exposure metrics and mammographic density. No association was observed between morning MT6s and mammographic density. CONCLUSIONS: The hypothesis on the link between rotating night shift work, melatonin synthesis disruption, and mammographic density is not supported by the results of the present study. IMPACT: It is unlikely that the development of breast cancer in nurses working rotating night shifts is mediated by an increase in mammographic density.
Address Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland. beatap@imp.lodz.pl
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22539602 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 159
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