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Author Sinam, B.; Sharma, S.; Thakurdas, P.; Joshi, D.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright photophase accelerates re-entrainment after experimental jetlag in Drosophila Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Die Naturwissenschaften Abbreviated Journal Naturwissenschaften  
  Volume 99 Issue 7 Pages 575-578  
  Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Drosophila/*physiology/*radiation effects; *Light; Motor Activity/physiology; *Photoperiod  
  Abstract The efficacy of bright photophase (BP) in accelerating the re-entrainment of Drosophila biarmipes rhythm following 8 h phase advance and delay of light-dark (LD) cycle was examined by subjecting the flies to 24 h LD cycles with dim photophase (DP) at 30 lx and BP at 300 lx. Re-entrainment was analysed by using the activity onset, activity offset and the duration of activity. Following LD advance or delay, the BP flies re-entrained faster than the DP flies which was attributed to the enhanced zeitgeber strength of BP. Nevertheless, the re-entrainment was a protracted process even in the BP flies since the activity offsets underwent more transients than the activity onsets. Thus, this study demonstrates that the BP accelerates the re-entrainment in D. biarmipes. It, however, also reveals that the re-entrainment is a prolonged process when the activity onset and offset are regarded as the rhythm markers.  
  Address Center for Biological Rhythm Research, Ahmednagar College, Ahmednagar, 414001, MS, India  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume (down) Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-1042 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22684252 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 109  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shimoda, M.; Honda, K.-ichiro url  doi
openurl 
  Title Insect reactions to light and its applications to pest management Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Applied Entomology and Zoology Abbreviated Journal Appl Entomol Zool  
  Volume 48 Issue 4 Pages 413-421  
  Keywords ultraviolet; light; Integrated pest management; Artificial lighting; Photoreception; Phototaxis; Light-emitting diode; *Lighting  
  Abstract Insects are able to see ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Nocturnal insects are often attracted to light sources that emit large amounts of UV radiation, and devices that exploit this behavior, such as light traps for forecasting pest outbreaks, and electric insect killers, have been developed. Some diurnal species are attracted to yellow; yellow pan traps are used for conducting surveys for pest outbreaks and yellow sticky plates are used for pest control. Lamps that give off yellow illumination have been used effectively to control the activity of nocturnal moths and thus reduce damage to fruit, vegetables, and flowers. Covering cultivation facilities with film that filters out near-UV radiation reduces the invasion of pests such as whiteflies and thrips into the facilities, thus reducing damage. Reflective material placed on cultivated land can control the approach of flying insects such as aphids. Future development and use of new light sources such as light-emitting diodes is anticipated for promoting integrated pest management.  
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  ISSN 0003-6862 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 110  
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Author Nowinszky, L.; Puskás, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-Trap Catch of the Harmful Moths Depending of Moonlight in North Carolina and Nebraska States of USA Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication ISRN Zoology Abbreviated Journal ISRN Zoology  
  Volume 2012 Issue Pages 1-6  
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  Series Volume (down) Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2090-5238 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 111  
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Author Johansen, N.S.; Vänninen, I.; Pinto, D.M.; Nissinen, A.I.; Shipp, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title In the light of new greenhouse technologies: 2. Direct effects of artificial lighting on arthropods and integrated pest management in greenhouse crops Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Annals of Applied Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 159 Issue 1 Pages 1-27  
  Keywords Behaviour; biology; insects; light intensity; mites; photobiology; photoperiod; photoreceptors; plant protection; visual ecology; wavelength distribution  
  Abstract Novel lighting technology offers the possibility of improved arthropod integrated pest management (IPM) in artificially lighted crops. This review compiles the current knowledge on how greenhouse pest and beneficial arthropods are directly affected by light, with the focus on whiteflies. The effect of ultraviolet depletion on orientation and colour-coded phototaxis are to some extent studied and utilised for control of the flying adult stage of some pest species, but far less is known about the visual ecology of commercially used biological control agents and pollinators, and about how light affects arthropod biology in different life stages. Four approaches for utilisation of artificial light in IPM of whiteflies are suggested: (a) use of attractive visual stimuli incorporated into traps for monitoring and direct control, (b) use of visual stimuli that disrupt the host-detection process, (c) radiation with harmful or inhibitory wavelengths to kill or suppress pest populations and (d) use of time cues to manipulate daily rhythms and photoperiodic responses. Knowledge gaps are identified to design a road map for research on IPM in crops lighted with high-pressure sodium lamps, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and photoselective films. LEDs are concluded to offer possibilities for behavioural manipulation of arthropods, but the extent of such possibilities depends in practice on which wavelength combinations are determined to be optimal for plant production. Furthermore, the direct effects of artificial lighting on IPM must be studied in the context of plant-mediated effects of artificial light on arthropods, as both types of manipulations are possible, particularly with LEDs.  
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  ISSN 0003-4746 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 112  
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Author Kempinger, L.; Dittmann, R.; Rieger, D.; Helfrich-Forster, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The nocturnal activity of fruit flies exposed to artificial moonlight is partly caused by direct light effects on the activity level that bypass the endogenous clock Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 26 Issue 2 Pages 151-166  
  Keywords ARNTL Transcription Factors; Animals; Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/genetics/metabolism; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Biological Clocks/*physiology; CLOCK Proteins; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Darkness; Drosophila Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Drosophila melanogaster/*physiology; *Light; *Moon; Motor Activity/*physiology; Nuclear Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Period Circadian Proteins; Photoperiod; Transcription Factors/genetics/metabolism  
  Abstract Artificial moonlight was recently shown to shift the endogenous clock of fruit flies and make them nocturnal. To test whether this nocturnal activity is partly due to masking effects of light, we exposed the clock-mutants per(01), tim(01), per(01);tim(01), cyc(01), and Clk(JRK) to light/dark and light/dim-light cycles and determined the activity level during the day and night. We found that under moonlit nights, all clock mutants shifted their activity significantly into the night, suggesting that this effect is independent of the clock. We also recorded the flies under continuous artificial moonlight and darkness to judge the effect of dim constant light on the activity level. All mutants, except Clk(JRK) flies, were significantly more active under artificial moonlight conditions than under complete darkness. Unexpectedly, we found residual rhythmicity of per(01) and especially tim(01) mutants under these conditions, suggesting that TIM and especially PER retained some activity in the absence of its respective partner. Nevertheless, as even the double mutants and the cyc(01) and Clk(JRK) mutants shifted their activity into the night, we conclude that dim light stimulates the activity of fruit flies in a clock-independent manner. Thus, nocturnal light has a twofold influence on flies: it shifts the circadian clock, and it increases nocturnal activity independently of the clock. The latter was also observed in some primates by others and might therefore be of a more general validity.  
  Address Institute of Zoology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany  
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  Series Volume (down) Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19212834 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 113  
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