|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Bierman, A.
Title Will switching to LED outdoor lighting increase sky glow? Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology
Volume 44 Issue 4 Pages 449-458
Keywords LED; light emitting diode; skyglow; light pollution; modeling; Radiative transfer
Abstract As LED sources are increasingly being used for outdoor lighting, concerns are being raised about their impact on man-made sky glow. This paper compares the amount of light scattered back to Earth from a 6500 K phosphor-converted white LED light source to that from a 2050 K high pressure sodium (HPS) light source. Calculations based solely on molecular Rayleigh scattering provide an upper limit of 22% more scatter from the LED source, but are not realistic because the atmosphere has significant scatter from aerosol content. Adding in the effects of aerosols in the atmosphere, as derived from aerosol optical depth measurements and Mie scattering distributions, reduces the wavelength dependency of scattered light to where the LED source has roughly 10–20% more scattered light contributing to sky glow. Scattering ratios (LED:HPS) are calculated for different angles and atmospheric conditions.
Address Lighting Research Center, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY 12180-3352, USA; bierma2(at)rpi.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Luginbuhl, Boley, and Davis (2013) dispute Bierman's thesis. Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 269
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Poulin, C.; Bruyant, F.; Laprise, M.-H.; Cockshutt, A.M.; Marie-Rose Vandenhecke, J.; Huot, Y.
Title The impact of light pollution on diel changes in the photophysiology of Microcystis aeruginosa Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Plankton Research Abbreviated Journal Journal of Plankton Research
Volume 36 Issue 1 Pages 286-291
Keywords light pollution; Microcystis aeruginosa; Cyanobacteria; diel cycles; biology; plankton
Abstract Assessing the effect of light pollution, Microcystis aeruginosa was grown with and without low levels of night lighting. Significant differences were observed between the treatments in the maximum quantum yield of charge separation, the intracellular chlorophyll a concentration, the functional absorption cross-section of photosystem II, the number of Rubisco per cell and per chlorophyll a, the number of photosystem I per chlorophyll a, and the chlorophyll a fraction not bound to the photosystems and IsiA.
Address Departement de Geomatique Appliquee, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0142-7873 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 352
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wahl, F.; Kantermann, T.; Amft, O.
Title How much Light do you get? Estimating Daily Light Exposure using Smartphones Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication Proceedings of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers Abbreviated Journal Proc. of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers
Volume n/a Issue n/a Pages 43-46
Keywords Instrumentation; light exposure; context inference, light intensity; light intake; circadian clock; circadian rhythm; mobile sensing
Abstract We present an approach to estimate a persons light exposure using smartphones. We used web-sourced weather reports combined with smartphone light sensor data, time of day, and indoor/outdoor information, to estimate illuminance around the user throughout a day. Since light dominates every human’s circadian rhythm and influences the sleep-wake cycle, we developed a smartphone-based system that does not re- quire additional sensors for illuminance estimation. To evaluate our approach, we conducted a free-living study with 12 users, each carrying a smartphone, a head-mounted light reference sensor, and a wrist-worn light sensing device for six consecutive days. Estimated light values were compared to the head-mounted reference, the wrist-worn device and a mean value estimate. Our results show that illuminance could be estimated at less than 20% error for all study participants, outperforming the wrist-worn device. In 9 out of 12 participants the estimation deviated less than 10% from the reference measurements.
Address ACTLab, Chair of Sensor Technology, University of Passau (florian.wahl@uni-passau.de)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ACM Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1206
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kaniewska, P.; Alon, S.; Karako-Lampert, S.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Levy, O.
Title Signaling cascades and the importance of moonlight in coral broadcast mass spawning Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication eLife Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue Pages e09991
Keywords Animals; coral; chronobiology; reproductive strategies; reproductive synchronization; Great Barrier Reef; neurohormones; marine; oceans; invertebrates
Abstract Many reef-building corals participate in a mass-spawning event that occurs yearly on the Great Barrier Reef. This coral reproductive event is one of earth's most prominent examples of synchronised behavior, and coral reproductive success is vital to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. Although several environmental cues have been implicated in the timing of mass spawning, the specific sensory cues that function together with endogenous clock mechanisms to ensure accurate timing of gamete release are largely unknown. Here, we show that moonlight is an important external stimulus for mass spawning synchrony and describe the potential mechanisms underlying the ability of corals to detect environmental triggers for the signaling cascades that ultimately result in gamete release. Our study increases the understanding of reproductive chronobiology in corals and strongly supports the hypothesis that coral gamete release is achieved by a complex array of potential neurohormones and light-sensing molecules.
Address Global Change Institute and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; oveh(at)uq.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher eLife Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2050-084X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1321
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Tong, K.P.; Bennie, J.; Birriel, I.; Birriel, J.J.; Cool, A.; Danielsen, A.; Davies, T.W.; Outer, P.N. den; Edwards, W.; Ehlert, R.; Falchi, F.; Fischer, J.; Giacomelli, A.; Giubbilini, F.; Haaima, M.; Hesse, C.; Heygster, G.; Hölker, F.; Inger, R.; Jensen, L.J.; Kuechly, H.U.; Kuehn, J.; Langill, P.; Lolkema, D.E.; Nagy, M.; Nievas, M.; Ochi, N.; Popow, E.; Posch, T.; Puschnig, J.; Ruhtz, T.; Schmidt, W.; Schwarz, R.; Schwope, A.; Spoelstra, H.; Tekatch, A.; Trueblood, M.; Walker, C.E.; Weber, M.; Welch, D.L.; Zamorano, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Worldwide variations in artificial skyglow Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci. Rep.
Volume 5 Issue Pages 8409
Keywords Skyglow; light pollution; measurements; remote sensing; sky brightness; calibration
Abstract Despite constituting a widespread and significant environmental change, understanding of artificial nighttime skyglow is extremely limited. Until now, published monitoring studies have been local or regional in scope, and typically of short duration. In this first major international compilation of monitoring data we answer several key questions about skyglow properties. Skyglow is observed to vary over four orders of magnitude, a range hundreds of times larger than was the case before artificial light. Nearly all of the study sites were polluted by artificial light. A non-linear relationship is observed between the sky brightness on clear and overcast nights, with a change in behavior near the rural to urban landuse transition. Overcast skies ranged from a third darker to almost 18 times brighter than clear. Clear sky radiances estimated by the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness were found to be overestimated by ~25%; our dataset will play an important role in the calibration and ground truthing of future skyglow models. Most of the brightly lit sites darkened as the night progressed, typically by ~5% per hour. The great variation in skyglow radiance observed from site-to-site and with changing meteorological conditions underlines the need for a long-term international monitoring program.
Address Leibniz-Institute for Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1103
Permanent link to this record