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Author Smalling, R.; Enright, J.
Title A Crusade on HSP Amber High Mast Yields Green with Plasma Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy Engr.
Volume 112 Issue 5 Pages 12-17
Keywords Lighting; Energy; lighting technology; light-emitting plasma; lighting transition; LEP; Washington
Abstract Naval Facilities Engineering Command Northwest (NAVFAC NW) Public Works Department (PWD) Everett recently completed a lighting replacement project at Naval Station (NS) Everett, Washington, utilizing a utility energy service contract (UESC) with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project replaced 74 high pressure sodium (HPS) light fixtures with modern energy saving, light-emitting plasma (LEP) fixtures atop 80-foot light poles along the piers and wharf at NS Everett. The no-glare LEP bulbs last twice as long while using less than half the power of their HPS predecessors. This project was completed at a cost of $160,000 and will result in cost avoidances in annual operating and maintenance of over $16,000, with a payback under 10 years. This UESC-financed and executed project saves one percent of the total shore energy consumption cost. Through similar efficiency projects and energy conservation efforts, NS Everett has reduced power usage by 16 percent in the past year and 40 percent since 2003.
Address 2000 West Marine View Drive, Bldg 2000, Rm 242 Everett, WA 98207
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1219
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Author Elvidge, C.D.; Baugh, K.E.; Kihn, E.A.; Kroehl, H.W.; Davis, E.R.
Title Mapping city lights with night-time data from the DMSP operational linescan system. Type Journal Article
Year 1997 Publication Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing
Volume 63 Issue 6 Pages 727-734
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has a unique capability to detect low levels of visible and near-infrared (VNIR) radiance at

night. With the OLS “VIS” band data, it is possible to detect clouds illuminated by moonlight, plus lights from cities, towns, industrial sites, gas pares, and ephemeral events such as fires and lightning illuminated clouds. This paper presents methods which have been developed for detecting and geolocating VNIR emission sources with nighttime DMSP-OLS data and the analysis of image time series to identify spatially stable emissions from cities, towns, and industrial sites. Results are presented for the United States.
Address Desert Research Institute, University of Nevada System, Reno, NV 89506 and the Solar-Terrestrial Physics Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Geophysical Data Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303; cde(at)ngdc.noaa.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 497
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Author Lima, R.C.; da Cunhac, J.P.; Peixinho, N.
Title Light Pollution: Assessment of Sky Glow on two Dark Sky Regions of Portugal Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues Abbreviated Journal J Toxicol Environm Health
Volume 79 Issue 7 Pages 307-319
Keywords Skyglow; Portugal; Peneda-Gerês National Park; Alqueva
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN), producing light pollution (LP), is not a matter restricted to astronomy anymore. Light is part of modern societies and, as a consequence, the natural cycle day–night (bright–dark) has been interrupted in a large segment of the global population. There is increasing evidence that exposure to certain types of light at night and beyond threshold levels may produce hazardous effects to humans and the environment. The concept of “dark skies reserves” is a step forward in order to preserve the night sky and a means of enhancing public awareness of the problem of spread of light pollution worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the skyglow at two sites in Portugal, the Peneda-Gerês National Park (PNPG) and the region now known as Dark Sky Alqueva Reserve. The latter site was classified as a “Starlight Tourism Destination“ by the Starlight Foundation (the first in the world to achieve this classification) following a series of night sky measurements in situ described herein. The measurements at PNPG also contributed to the new set of regulations concerning light pollution at this national park. This study presents the first in situ systematic measurements of night sky brightness, showing that at the two sites the skies are mostly in levels 3 to 4 of the Bortle 9-level scale (with level 1 being the best achievable). The results indicate that the sources of light pollution and skyglow can be attributed predominantly to contamination from nearby urban regions.
Address Physics, School of Allied Health Technologies of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1408
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Author Crumey, A.
Title Human Contrast Threshold and Astronomical Visibility. Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS
Volume 422 Issue 3 Pages 2600-2619
Keywords Vision; visibility; skyglow; sky brightness; modeling
Abstract The standard visibility model in light-pollution studies is the formula of Hecht, as used e.g. by Schaefer. However, it is applicable only to point sources and is shown to be of limited accuracy. A new visibility model is presented for uniform achromatic targets of any size against background luminances ranging from zero to full daylight, produced by a systematic procedure applicable to any appropriate data set (e.g. Blackwell's), and based on a simple but previously unrecognized empirical relation between contrast threshold and adaptation luminance. The scotopic luminance correction for variable spectral radiance (colour index) is calculated. For point sources, the model is more accurate than Hecht's formula and is verified using telescopic data collected at Mount Wilson in 1947, enabling the sky brightness at that time to be determined. The result is darker than the calculation by Garstang, implying that light pollution grew more rapidly in subsequent decades than has been supposed. The model is applied to the nebular observations of William Herschel, enabling his visual performance to be quantified. Proposals are made regarding sky quality indicators for public use.
Address Department of Humanities, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST, UK; andrew.crumey(at)northumbria.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 536
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Author Bortle, J.E.
Title Introducing the Bortle Dark-Sky Scale. Type Journal Article
Year 2001 Publication Sky & Telescope Abbreviated Journal Sky Telesc
Volume Issue 60 Pages 126-129
Keywords Vision; skyglow; visibility; sky brightness
Abstract How dark is your sky? The relationship between light pollution and astronomy is a concern amateurs and professional astronomers alike. Are your skies dark enough? A precise answer to this question is useful for comparing observing sites and, more important, for determining whether a site is dark enough to let you push your eyes, telescope, or camera to their theoretical limits. Likewise, you need accurate criteria for judging sky conditions when documenting unusual or borderline observations, such as an extremely long comet tail, a faint aurora, or subtle features in galaxies.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Sky Publishing Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0037-6604 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @; IDA @ john @ Serial 556
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