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Author Oike, H.; Sakurai, M.; Ippoushi, K.; Kobori, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Time-fixed feeding prevents obesity induced by chronic advances of light/dark cycles in mouse models of jet-lag/shift work Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications Abbreviated Journal Biochem Biophys Res Commun  
  Volume 465 Issue 3 Pages 556-561  
  Keywords Animals; *Circadian Clocks; *Disease Models, Animal; *Feeding Behavior; Jet Lag Syndrome/*physiopathology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Obesity/etiology/*physiopathology/*prevention & control; Photoperiod; Circadian rhythm; Clock genes; Jet lag; Metabolic disorders; Obesity; Shift work  
  Abstract Recent findings have uncovered intimate relationships between circadian clocks and energy metabolism. Epidemiological studies have shown that the frequency of obesity and metabolic disorders increases among shift-workers. Here we found that a chronic shift in light/dark (LD) cycles comprising an advance of six hours twice weekly, induced obesity in mice. Under such conditions that imitate jet lag/shift work, body weight and glucose intolerance increased, more fat accumulated in white adipose tissues and the expression profiles of metabolic genes changed in the liver compared with normal LD conditions. Mice fed at a fixed 12 h under the LD shift notably did not develop symptoms of obesity despite isocaloric intake. These results suggest that jet lag/shift work induces obesity as a result of fluctuating feeding times and it can be prevented by fixing meal times. This rodent model of obesity might serve as a useful tool for understanding why shift work induces metabolic disorders.  
  Address Food Function Division, National Food Research Institute, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642, Japan; oike(at)affrc.go.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-291X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26297949 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1318  
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Author Cho, H.M.; Lee, M.K.; Chang, S.J.; Kim, S. openurl 
  Title Analysis on Luminance of Outdoor Signboards of Commercial Areas in Seoul at Night Considering Light Pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of The Korean Society of Living Environment System Abbreviated Journal J. Korean Soc. Living Environ. Sys  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 583-595-589  
  Keywords Lighting; Light pollution; Commercial areas; Night-time lighting; Outdoor Signboards; Luminance; outdoor lighting; artificial light at night; signs; LED signs; LED billboards  
  Abstract As the city is commercialized, the number of stores is increased and it also makes outdoor billboards’ number increased accordingly. And signboards on the street make pedestrians unpleasant, making light pollution by light reflection. In this study, we measured the luminance to target the outdoor signboards of commercial area in Seoul. On the basis of the obtained results, the External system showed high luminance values, and the luminance values of Letter-type system were lower. Furthermore, the measured value at the midnight time was higher, and we considered that the more floating population bring about the high luminance value of the External system. The signboards of External system should be avoided, the Letter-type system should be recommended.  
  Address School of Architecture, Soongsil University, Seoul, Korea; skim(at)ssu.ac.kr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1319  
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Author Rowse, E.G., Lewanzik, D.; Stone, E.L.; Harris, S.; Jones, G. url  doi
isbn  openurl
  Title Dark Matters: The Effects of Artificial Lighting on Bats Type Book Chapter
  Year 2015 Publication Bats in the Anthropocene: Conservation of Bats in a Changing World Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 187-213  
  Keywords Animals; bats; vertebrates; ecology; artificial light at night; climate change  
  Abstract While artificial lighting is a major component of global change, its biological impacts have only recently been recognised. Artificial lighting attracts and repels animals in taxon-specific ways and affects physiological processes. Being nocturnal, bats are likely to be strongly affected by artificial lighting. Moreover, many species of bats are insectivorous, and insects are also strongly influenced by lighting. Lighting technologies are changing rapidly, with the use of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps increasing. Impacts on bats and their prey depend on the light spectra produced by street lights ; ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths attract more insects and consequently insectivorous bats. Bat responses to lighting are species-specific and reflect differences in flight morphology and performance ; fast-flying aerial hawking species frequently feed around street lights, whereas relatively slow-flying bats that forage in more confined spaces are often light-averse. Both high-pressure sodium and LED lights reduce commuting activity by clutter-tolerant bats of the genera Myotis and Rhinolophus, and these bats still avoided LED lights when dimmed. Light-induced reductions in the activity of frugivorous bats may affect ecosystem services by reducing dispersal of the seeds of pioneer plants and hence reforestation. Rapid changes in street lighting offer the potential to explore mitigation methods such as part-night lighting (PNL), dimming, directed lighting, and motion-sensitive lighting that may have beneficial consequences for light-averse bat specie.  
  Address School of Life Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; Gareth.Jones(at)bristol.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor Voigt, C.C.; Kingston; T.  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-3-319-25218-6 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1320  
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Author Cao, D.; Barrionuevo, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The importance of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells and implications for lighting design Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Solid State Lighting Abbreviated Journal J Sol State Light  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 10  
  Keywords Human Health; lighting; Melanopsin; ipRGC; Photoreceptors; Circadian; Visual perception; Color Contrast; Sensitivity; LED; Lighting Design  
  Abstract We reviewed the role of melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in light-dependent functions, including circadian rhythm that is important for health and visual perception. We then discussed the implications for lighting design.  
  Address Visual Perception Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago; dcao98(at)uic.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2196-1107 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1325  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shaw, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night as Fragmenting Frontier: Understanding the Night that Remains in an era of24/7: Night as Fragmenting Frontier Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Geography Compass Abbreviated Journal Geography Compass  
  Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages 637-647  
  Keywords Society; geography; social science  
  Abstract Social scientists have previously understood the night through a frontier metaphor. This has pitched night as an empty or lightly inhabited space into which the urban, capitalist day has been expanding. The contemporary increase in nocturnal research has complicated this picture, showing an increasing multiplicity of complexly lived, structured and experienced nights across the globe. This paper looks to retrieve the concept of night as frontier by drawing on postcolonial theories to generate a more subtle conceptualisation of ‘frontier’, while also arguing that recent research reveals that this frontier is now fragmenting. By exploring research into a series of core themes – artificial light at night and darkness; night-lives; and global nights – I then explore what such an understanding of night allows us to say about current research. As nocturnal social science continues to mature, a more critical eye will need to be paid to the complexity of shifting power relations and identities within this fragmenting nocturnal frontier.  
  Address School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, Claremont Tower, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 7RU; robert.shaw2(at)ncl.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1749-8198 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1326  
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