|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Yorzinski, J.L.; Chisholm, S.; Byerley, S.D.; Coy, J.R.; Aziz, A.; Wolf, J.A.; Gnerlich, A.C.
Title Artificial light pollution increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal
Volume 3 Issue Pages e1174
Keywords Animals; peafowl; Pavo cristatus; animal behavior; ecology; zoology
Abstract Artificial light pollution is drastically changing the sensory environments of animals. Even though many animals are now living in these changed environments, the effect light pollution has on animal behavior is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of light pollution on nocturnal vigilance in peahens (Pavo cristatus). Captive peahens were exposed to either artificial lighting or natural lighting at night. We employed a novel method to record their vigilance behavior by attaching accelerometers to their heads and continuously monitoring their large head movements. We found that light pollution significantly increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens. Furthermore, the birds faced a trade-off between vigilance and sleep at night: peahens that were more vigilant spent less time sleeping. Given the choice, peahens preferred to roost away from high levels of artificial lighting but showed no preference for roosting without artificial lighting or with low levels of artificial lighting. Our study demonstrates that light pollution can have a substantial impact on animal behavior that can potentially result in fitness consequences.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States; jyorzinski(at)purdue.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher PeerJ Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1244
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhuo, L.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, X.; Li, J.; Liu, L.
Title An improved method of night-time light saturation reduction based on EVI Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 36 Issue 16 Pages 4114-4130
Keywords Remote Sensing; DMSP; DMSP-OLS; Nighttime Lights; NTL; VANUI; EVI; EANTLI; RCNTL; VIIRS
Abstract Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) night-time light (NTL) data have been widely applied to studies on anthropogenic activities and their interactions with the environment. Due to limitations of the OLS sensor, DMSP NTL data suffer from a saturation problem in central urban areas, which further affects studies based on nocturnal lights. Recently, the vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index (VANUI) has been developed based on the inverse correlation of vegetation and urban surfaces. Despite its simple implementation and ability to effectively increase variations in NTL data, VANUI does not perform well in certain rapidly growing cities. In this study, we propose a new index, denoted enhanced vegetation index (EVI)-adjusted NTL index (EANTLI), that was developed by reforming the VANUI algorithm and utilizing the EVI. Comparisons with radiance-calibrated NTL (RCNTL) and the new Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data for 15 cities worldwide show that EANTLI reduces saturation in urban cores and mitigates the blooming effect in suburban areas. EANTLI’s similarity to RCNTL and VIIRS is consistently higher than VANUI’s similarity to RCNTL and VIIRS in both spatial distribution and latitudinal transects. EANTLI also yields better results in the estimation of electric power consumption of 166 Chinese prefecture-level cities. In conclusion, EANTLI can effectively reduce NTL saturation in urban centres, thus presenting great potential for wide-range applications.
Address Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Geo-simulation, School of Geography and Planning, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, PR China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1245
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Constant, N.
Title Geospatial assessment of artificial lighting impacts on sea turtles in Tortuguero, Costa Rica Type Manuscript
Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; sea turtles; light pollution; GIS; Tortuguero; Costa Rica
Abstract Between June and August 2014, I conducted walking surveys to map the nesting beach

and light sources using a Trimble Juno SB GPS unit, and I developed a GIS database that formed the basis for subsequent analyses and data visualization. I built STC’s monitoring data from 2004 through 2014 into a polygon layer of the beach subdivided into mile sections defined by mile markers erected by STC. During the new moon in June and July 2014, I conducted brightness surveys in concert with STC’s light surveys and measured brightness in units of luminance at 50-meter intervals along the beach using a Unihedron Sky Quality Meter. Using spatial data of the beach and light sources, luminance data from brightness assessments, and monitoring data from STC, I determined a mean luminance value for each mile section, examined the relationship between luminance and nesting activity, and mapped light pollution on the beach.

I found that mean luminance and the total number of green turtle emergences per mile section were significantly negatively correlated. Mean luminance exceeded the minimum threshold for light pollution in 6 of the 43 mile sections, and there were significantly fewer emergences in mile sections experiencing light pollution. Mean luminance was highest in mile sections adjacent to Tortuguero Village, where sources of artificial light were concentrated. These findings were consistent with STC’s light survey data, and mean light count and the total number of green turtle emergences per mile section from 2004 to 2014 were also significantly negatively correlated. Cumulatively, these results suggest that artificial lighting from adjacent development impacts green turtle utilization of nesting habitat and changes the spatial distribution of green turtle nesting activity on Tortuguero Beach.

These results were consistent with the findings of previous studies conducted on sea turtle nesting beaches and support the need for a turtle-friendly lighting initiative in Tortuguero.
Address Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, 450 Research Dr, Durham, NC 27708 USA
Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis
Publisher Duke University Place of Publication Durham, NC Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1247
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ouyang, J.Q; Maaike de Jong, M.H.; Visser, M.E.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Ouyang, J.Q
Title Stressful colours: corticosterone concentrations in a free-living songbird vary with the spectral composition of experimental illumination Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol. Lett.
Volume 11 Issue Pages 20150517
Keywords Animals; birds; corticosterone; stress; Parus major; great tit; artificial light; light spectra
Abstract Organisms have evolved under natural daily light/dark cycles for millions of years. These cycles have been disturbed as night-time darkness is increasingly replaced by artificial illumination. Investigating the physiological consequences of free-living organisms in artificially lit environments is crucial to determine whether nocturnal lighting disrupts circadian rhythms, changes behaviour, reduces fitness and ultimately affects population numbers. We make use of a unique, large-scale network of replicated field sites which were experimentally illuminated at night using lampposts emanating either red, green, white or no light to test effect on stress hormone concentrations (corticosterone) in a songbird, the great tit (Parus major). Adults nesting in white-light transects had higher corticosterone concentrations than in the other treatments. We also found a significant interaction between distance to the closest lamppost and treatment type: individuals in red light had higher corticosterone levels when they nested closer to the lamppost than individuals nesting farther away, a decline not observed in the green or dark treatment. Individuals with high corticosterone levels had fewer fledglings, irrespective of treatment. These results show that artificial light can induce changes in individual hormonal phenotype. As these effects vary considerably with light spectrum, it opens the possibility to mitigate these effects by selecting street lighting of specific spectra.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, The Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands; j.ouyang(at)nioo.knaw.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1248
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kocifaj, M.; Solano Lamphar, H.A.; Kundracik, F.
Title Retrieval of Garstang's emission function from all-sky camera images Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc.
Volume 453 Issue 1 Pages 819-827
Keywords Skyglow; scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; methods: data analysis; methods: numerical methods: observational
Abstract The emission function from ground-based light sources predetermines the skyglow features to a large extent, while most mathematical models that are used to predict the night sky brightness require the information on this function. The radiant intensity distribution on a clear sky is experimentally determined as a function of zenith angle using the theoretical approach published only recently in MNRAS, 439, 3405–3413. We have made the experiments in two localities in Slovakia and Mexico by means of two digital single lens reflex professional cameras operating with different lenses that limit the system's field-of-view to either 180º or 167º. The purpose of using two cameras was to identify variances between two different apertures. Images are taken at different distances from an artificial light source (a city) with intention to determine the ratio of zenith radiance relative to horizontal irradiance. Subsequently, the information on the fraction of the light radiated directly into the upward hemisphere (F) is extracted. The results show that inexpensive devices can properly identify the upward emissions with adequate reliability as long as the clear sky radiance distribution is dominated by a largest ground-based light source. Highly unstable turbidity conditions can also make the parameter F difficult to find or even impossible to retrieve. The measurements at low elevation angles should be avoided due to a potentially parasitic effect of direct light emissions from luminaires surrounding the measuring site.
Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská Road 9, 845 03 Bratislava, Slovak Republic; kocifaj(at)savba.sk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1249
Permanent link to this record