|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.X.; Erren, T.C.; Fuentes-Broto, L.; Paredes, S.D.
Title Light-mediated perturbations of circadian timing and cancer risk: a mechanistic analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Integrative Cancer Therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther
Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 354-360
Keywords *Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Melatonin/antagonists & inhibitors; Neoplasms/*etiology/physiopathology; Risk Factors; Sleep Deprivation/complications; oncogenesis
Abstract In industrialized countries, certain types of cancer, most notably, breast and prostate, are more frequent than in poorly developed nations. This high cancer frequency is not explained by any of the conventional causes. Within the past decade, numerous reports have appeared that link light at night with an elevated cancer risk. The three major consequences of light at night are sleep deprivation, chronodisruption, and melatonin suppression. Each of these individually or in combination may contribute to the reported rise in certain types of cancer. In this article, the potential mechanisms underlying the basis of the elevated cancer risk are briefly discussed. Finally, if cancer is a consequence of excessive nighttime light, it is likely that other diseases/conditions may also be exaggerated by the widespread use of light after darkness onset.
Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA. reiter@uthscsa.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1534-7354 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20042411 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 290
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Figueiro, M.G.; Rea, M.S.
Title The effects of red and blue lights on circadian variations in cortisol, alpha amylase, and melatonin Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Int J Endocrinol
Volume 2010 Issue Pages 829351
Keywords blue light; red light; circadian rhythm; cortisol; alpha amylase; melatonin; photobiology; suprachiasmatic nuclei; endocrinology
Abstract The primary purpose of the present study was to expand our understanding of the impact of light exposures on the endocrine and autonomic systems as measured by acute cortisol, alpha amylase, and melatonin responses. We utilized exposures from narrowband long-wavelength (red) and from narrow-band short-wavelength (blue) lights to more precisely understand the role of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in these responses. In a within-subjects experimental design, twelve subjects periodically received one-hour corneal exposures of 40 lux from the blue or from the red lights while continuously awake for 27 hours. Results showed-that, as expected, only the blue light reduced nocturnal melatonin. In contrast, both blue and red lights affected cortisol levels and, although less clear, alpha amylase levels as well. The present data bring into question whether the nonvisual pathway mediating nocturnal melatonin suppression is the same as that mediating other responses to light exhibited by the endocrine and the autonomic nervous systems.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, 3rd Floor, Troy, New York, NY 12180, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1687-8337 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20652045; PMCID:PMC2905913 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 291
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boyce, P.R.
Title Review: The Impact of Light in Buildings on Human Health Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Indoor and Built Environment Abbreviated Journal Indoor and Built Environment
Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 8-20
Keywords Human Health; indoor light; circadian disruption; shift work; oncogenesis; Review
Abstract The effects of light on health can be divided into three sections. The first is that of light as radiation. Exposure to the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiation produced by light sources can damage both the eye and skin, through both thermal and photochemical mechanisms. Such damage is rare for indoor lighting installations designed for vision but can occur in some situations. The second is light operating through the visual system. Lighting enables us to see but lighting conditions that cause visual discomfort are likely to lead to eyestrain. Anyone who frequently experiences eyestrain is not enjoying the best of health. The lighting conditions that cause visual discomfort in buildings are well known and easily avoided. The third is light operating through the circadian system. This is known to influence sleep patterns and believed to be linked to the development of breast cancer among night shift workers. There is still much to learn about the impact of light on human health but what is known is enough to ensure that the topic requires the attention of all those concerned with the lighting of buildings.
Address Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1420-326X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 292
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cajochen, C.; Frey, S.; Anders, D.; Spati, J.; Bues, M.; Pross, A.; Mager, R.; Wirz-Justice, A.; Stefani, O.
Title Evening exposure to a light-emitting diodes (LED)-backlit computer screen affects circadian physiology and cognitive performance Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) Abbreviated Journal J Appl Physiol (1985)
Volume 110 Issue 5 Pages 1432-1438
Keywords Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology/radiation effects; Cognition/*physiology/radiation effects; *Computer Terminals; Humans; Light; Lighting/*methods; Male; Photic Stimulation/*methods; Radiation Dosage; Semiconductors; *Task Performance and Analysis; Young Adult; blue light; sleep; circadian disruption
Abstract Many people spend an increasing amount of time in front of computer screens equipped with light-emitting diodes (LED) with a short wavelength (blue range). Thus we investigated the repercussions on melatonin (a marker of the circadian clock), alertness, and cognitive performance levels in 13 young male volunteers under controlled laboratory conditions in a balanced crossover design. A 5-h evening exposure to a white LED-backlit screen with more than twice as much 464 nm light emission {irradiance of 0,241 Watt/(steradian x m(2)) [W/(sr x m(2))], 2.1 x 10(13) photons/(cm(2) x s), in the wavelength range of 454 and 474 nm} than a white non-LED-backlit screen [irradiance of 0,099 W/(sr x m(2)), 0.7 x 10(13) photons/(cm(2) x s), in the wavelength range of 454 and 474 nm] elicited a significant suppression of the evening rise in endogenous melatonin and subjective as well as objective sleepiness, as indexed by a reduced incidence of slow eye movements and EEG low-frequency activity (1-7 Hz) in frontal brain regions. Concomitantly, sustained attention, as determined by the GO/NOGO task; working memory/attention, as assessed by “explicit timing”; and declarative memory performance in a word-learning paradigm were significantly enhanced in the LED-backlit screen compared with the non-LED condition. Screen quality and visual comfort were rated the same in both screen conditions, whereas the non-LED screen tended to be considered brighter. Our data indicate that the spectral profile of light emitted by computer screens impacts on circadian physiology, alertness, and cognitive performance levels. The challenge will be to design a computer screen with a spectral profile that can be individually programmed to add timed, essential light information to the circadian system in humans.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospitals of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. christian.cajochen@upkbs.ch
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-7567 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21415172 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 293
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gooley, J.J.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Brainard, G.C.; Kronauer, R.E.; Czeisler, C.A.; Lockley, S.W.
Title Spectral responses of the human circadian system depend on the irradiance and duration of exposure to light Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Science Translational Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sci Transl Med
Volume 2 Issue 31 Pages 31ra33
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Circadian Rhythm/physiology/*radiation effects; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Humans; Light; Melatonin/secretion; Photoperiod; Phototherapy; Retina/physiology/radiation effects; Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells/physiology/radiation effects; Retinal Ganglion Cells/physiology/radiation effects; Rod Opsins/physiology; Young Adult; blue light; light at night; melatonin; melanopsin; light therapy
Abstract In humans, modulation of circadian rhythms by light is thought to be mediated primarily by melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells, not rods or cones. Melanopsin cells are intrinsically blue light-sensitive but also receive input from visual photoreceptors. We therefore tested in humans whether cone photoreceptors contribute to the regulation of circadian and neuroendocrine light responses. Dose-response curves for melatonin suppression and circadian phase resetting were constructed in subjects exposed to blue (460 nm) or green (555 nm) light near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion. At the beginning of the intervention, 555-nm light was equally effective as 460-nm light at suppressing melatonin, suggesting a significant contribution from the three-cone visual system (lambda(max) = 555 nm). During the light exposure, however, the spectral sensitivity to 555-nm light decayed exponentially relative to 460-nm light. For phase-resetting responses, the effects of exposure to low-irradiance 555-nm light were too large relative to 460-nm light to be explained solely by the activation of melanopsin. Our findings suggest that cone photoreceptors contribute substantially to nonvisual responses at the beginning of a light exposure and at low irradiances, whereas melanopsin appears to be the primary circadian photopigment in response to long-duration light exposure and at high irradiances. These results suggest that light therapy for sleep disorders and other indications might be optimized by stimulating both photoreceptor systems.
Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1946-6234 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20463367 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 294
Permanent link to this record