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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N.
Title Association between light exposure at night and nighttime blood pressure in the elderly independent of nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 31 Issue 6 Pages 779-786
Keywords Actigraphy; circadian rhythm; elderly; light at night; melatonin; nighttime blood pressure; geriatrics
Abstract Circadian misalignment between internal and environmental rhythms dysregulates blood pressure (BP) variability because of disruption of the biological clock, resulting in increased nighttime BP. Although exposure to light-at-night is associated with the circadian misalignment, it remains unclear whether exposure to light-at-night in home settings is associated with nighttime BP. In this cross-sectional analysis of 528 elderly individuals (mean age: 72.8 years), we measured bedroom light intensity at 1-min intervals on two consecutive nights along with ambulatory BP, overnight urinary melatonin excretion and actigraphy. With regard to adjusted mean comparisons using analysis of covariance, the light-at-night group (average: >/=5 lux; n = 109) showed significantly higher nighttime systolic BP (SBP; adjusted mean: 120.8 vs. 116.5 mmHg, p = 0.01) and diastolic BP (70.1 vs. 67.1 mmHg, p < 0.01) compared with the Darker group (average: <5 lux; n = 419) independently of potential confounding factors including overnight urinary melatonin excretion and actigraphic sleep quality. We observed consistent associations between light-at-night and nighttime BP in different cutoff values for light-at-night intensity (i.e. 3 and 10 lux). In conclusion, exposure to light-at-night in home settings is significantly associated with increased nighttime BP in elderly individuals independently of overnight urinary melatonin excretion. A 4.3 mmHg increase in nighttime SBP is associated with a 6.1% increase in total mortality, which corresponds to approximately 10 000 annual excess deaths in Japanese elderly population.
Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine , Nara , Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Informa Plc Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24673296 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 315
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Author Landgraf, D.; McCarthy, M.J.; Welsh, D.K.
Title The role of the circadian clock in animal models of mood disorders Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci
Volume 128 Issue 3 Pages 344-359
Keywords *Circadian Rhythm; mood; mood disorders; circadian disruption
Abstract An association between circadian clock function and mood regulation is well established and has been proposed as a factor in the development of mood disorders. Patients with depression or mania suffer disturbed sleep-wake cycles and altered rhythms in daily activities. Environmentally disrupted circadian rhythms increase the risk of mood disorders in the general population. However, proof that a disturbance of circadian rhythms is causally involved in the development of psychiatric disorders remains elusive. Using clock gene mutants, manipulations of sleep-wake and light-dark cycles, and brain lesions affecting clock function, animal models have been developed to investigate whether circadian rhythm disruptions alter mood. In this review, selected animal models are examined to address the issue of causality between circadian rhythms and affective behavior.
Address Research Service, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24660657 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 316
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Author Gaston, K.J.; Bennie, J.
Title Demographic effects of artificial nighttime lighting on animal populations Type Book Chapter
Year 2014 Publication Environmental Reviews Abbreviated Journal Environ. Rev.
Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 323-330
Keywords diurnal; lighting; night; nocturnal; light pollution; light at night; Photoperiodism; demography; demographics; population dynamics
Abstract Artificial lighting, especially but not exclusively through street lights, has transformed the nighttime environment in much of the world. Impacts have been identified across multiple levels of biological organization and process. The influences, however, on population dynamics, particularly through the combined effects on the key demographic rates (immigration, births, deaths, emigration) that determine where individual species occur and in what numbers, have not previously been well characterized. The majority of attention explicitly on demographic parameters to date has been placed on the attraction of organisms to lights, and thus effectively local immigration, the large numbers of individuals that can be involved, and then to some extent the mortality that can often result. Some of the most important influences of nighttime lighting, however, are likely more subtle and less immediately apparent to the human observer. Particularly significant are effects of nighttime lighting on demography that act through (i) circadian clocks and photoperiodism and thence on birth rates; (ii) time partitioning and thence on death rates; and (iii) immigration/emigration through constraining the movements of individuals amongst habitat networks, especially as a consequence of continuously lit linear features such as roads and footpaths. Good model organisms are required to enable the relative consequences of such effects to be effectively determined, and a wider consideration of the effects of artificial light at night is needed in demographic studies across a range of species.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Canadian Science Publishing Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1181-8700 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 317
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Author Bará, S.; Nievas, M.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Zamorano, J.
Title Zernike analysis of all-sky night brightness maps Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Applied Optics Abbreviated Journal Appl Opt
Volume 53 Issue 12 Pages 2677-2686
Keywords modeling; light at night; light pollution; all-sky; Zernike polynomials; image decomposition; sky brightness
Abstract All-sky night brightness maps (calibrated images of the night sky with hemispherical field-of-view (FOV) taken at standard photometric bands) provide useful data to assess the light pollution levels at any ground site. We show that these maps can be efficiently described and analyzed using Zernike circle polynomials. The relevant image information can be compressed into a low-dimensional coefficients vector, giving an analytical expression for the sky brightness and alleviating the effects of noise. Moreover, the Zernike expansions allow us to quantify in a straightforward way the average and zenithal sky brightness and its variation across the FOV, providing a convenient framework to study the time course of these magnitudes. We apply this framework to analyze the results of a one-year campaign of night sky brightness measurements made at the UCM observatory in Madrid.
Address Área de Óptica, Dept. de Física Aplicada, Fac. de Física, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Optical Society of America Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-6935 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24787595 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 318
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Author De Almeida, A.; Santos, B.; Paolo, B.; Quicheron, M.
Title Solid state lighting review – Potential and challenges in Europe Type Book Chapter
Year 2014 Publication Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews Abbreviated Journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
Volume 34 Issue Pages 30-48
Keywords Lighting; solid-state lighting; LED; lighting technology; review; Europe
Abstract According to IEA estimates, about 19% of the electricity used in the world is for lighting loads with a slightly smaller fraction used in the European Union (14%). Lighting was the first service offered by electric utilities and still continues to be one of the largest electrical end-uses. Most current lighting technologies can be vastly improved, and therefore lighting loads present a huge potential for electricity savings.

Solid State Lighting (SSL) is amongst the most energy-efficient and environmentally friendly lighting technology. SSL has already reached a high efficiency level (over 276 lm/W) at ever-decreasing costs. Additionally the lifetime of LED lamps is several times longer than discharge lamps. This paper presents an overview of the state of the art SSL technology trends.

SSL technology is evolving fast, which can bring many advantages to the lighting marketplace. However, there are still some market barriers that are hindering the high cost-effective potential of energy-efficient lighting from being achieved. This paper presents several strategies and recommendations in order to overcome existing barriers and promote a faster penetration of SSL. The estimated savings potential through the application of SSL lighting systems in the European Union (EU) is around 209 TWh, which translates into 77 million tonnes of CO2. The economic benefits translate into the equivalent annual electrical output of about 26 large power plants (1000 MW electric). Similar impacts, in terms of percentage savings, can be expected in other parts of the World.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1364-0321 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 319
Permanent link to this record