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Author Yeh, C.; Perez, A.; Driscoll, A.; Azzari, G.; Tang, Z.; Lobell, D.; Ermon, S.; Burke, M.
Title (down) Using publicly available satellite imagery and deep learning to understand economic well-being in Africa Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Nature Communications Abbreviated Journal Nat Commun
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 2583
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Accurate and comprehensive measurements of economic well-being are fundamental inputs into both research and policy, but such measures are unavailable at a local level in many parts of the world. Here we train deep learning models to predict survey-based estimates of asset wealth across ~ 20,000 African villages from publicly-available multispectral satellite imagery. Models can explain 70% of the variation in ground-measured village wealth in countries where the model was not trained, outperforming previous benchmarks from high-resolution imagery, and comparison with independent wealth measurements from censuses suggests that errors in satellite estimates are comparable to errors in existing ground data. Satellite-based estimates can also explain up to 50% of the variation in district-aggregated changes in wealth over time, with daytime imagery particularly useful in this task. We demonstrate the utility of satellite-based estimates for research and policy, and demonstrate their scalability by creating a wealth map for Africa's most populous country.
Address National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA, 02138-5398, USA. mburke@stanford.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32444658 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2939
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Author Troy, J.R.; Holmes, N.D.; Veech, J.A.; Green, M.C.
Title (down) Using observed seabird fallout records to infer patterns of attraction to artificial light Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Endangered Species Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 225-234
Keywords Animals; Anthropogenic light; GIS-based modeling; Hawaii; Kauai; Light attraction; Procellariiformes; Newell’s shearwater; Seabird conservation
Abstract Attraction of fledgling shearwaters, petrels, and storm-petrels to artificial light has been documented for decades on islands around the world and is considered a significant threat to many species. Although large numbers of downed birds have been observed after being disoriented by light, several important elements of this ‘fallout’ phenomenon are unknown, including the locations along the path from nest to ocean at which attraction and/or disorientation occurs and whether fledglings can be attracted back to land after reaching the ocean in numbers large enough to contribute significantly to fallout. To investigate these questions, we compared observed Newell’s shearwater Puffinus newelli fallout records (from 1998 to 2009) on Kauai, USA, with expected numbers generated from several hypothetical models containing basic assumptions related to fledgling movement and attraction to light. Based on our results, the spatial pattern of observed fallout is consistent with the amount of light that fledglings may view along their first flights to and beyond the coastline. This suggests that even fledglings from dark regions of the island may not be safe because they may view light after reaching the ocean and still be susceptible to attraction. These findings support recent modeling efforts predicting that most birds fledging from Kauai are likely exposed to at least some anthropogenic light. As nocturnal use of light by humans is unlikely to be eliminated, research on the types of artificial light that are both useful to humans and safe for seabirds may be crucial for the conservation of these important marine animals.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 383
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Author Newman, R.C.; Ellis, T.; Davison, P.I.; Ives, M.J.; Thomas, R.J.; Griffiths, S.W.; Riley, W.D.
Title (down) Using novel methodologies to examine the impact of artificial light at night on the cortisol stress response in dispersing Atlantic salmon (Salmo salarL.) fry Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Physiol
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages cov051
Keywords Animals; salmon; Salmo salar; Artificial light at night; Atlantic salmon; cortisol
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is gaining recognition as having an important anthropogenic impact on the environment, yet the behavioural and physiological impacts of this stressor are largely unknown. This dearth of information is particularly true for freshwater ecosystems, which are already heavily impacted by anthropogenic pressures. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) is a species of conservation and economic importance whose ecology and behaviour is well studied, making it an ideal model species. Recent investigations have demonstrated that salmon show disrupted behaviour in response to artificial light; however, it is not yet clear which physiological processes are behind the observed behavioural modifications. Here, two novel non-invasive sampling methods were used to examine the cortisol stress response of dispersing salmon fry under different artificial lighting intensities. Fish egg and embryos were reared under differing ALAN intensities and individual measures of stress were subsequently taken from dispersing fry using static sampling, whereas population-level measures were achieved using deployed passive samplers. Dispersing fry exposed to experimental confinement showed elevated cortisol levels, indicating the capacity to mount a stress response at this early stage in ontogenesis. However, only one of the two methods for sampling cortisol used in this study indicated that ALAN may act as a stressor to dispersing salmon fry. As such, a cortisol-mediated response to light was not strongly supported. Furthermore, the efficacy of the two non-invasive methodologies used in this study is, subject to further validation, indicative of them proving useful in future ecological studies.
Address School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 2920 875 729; newmanrc(at)cardiff.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2051-1434 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1397
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Author Ghosh, T.; Anderson, S.; Elvidge, C.; Sutton, P.
Title (down) Using Nighttime Satellite Imagery as a Proxy Measure of Human Well-Being Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 5 Issue 12 Pages 4988-5019
Keywords Remote Sensing
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ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 941
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Author Imhoff, M.
Title (down) Using nighttime DMSP/OLS images of city lights to estimate the impact of urban land use on soil resources in the United States Type Journal Article
Year 1997 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 105-117
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Nightime “city light” footprints derived from DMSP/OLS satellite images were merged with census data and a digital soils map in a continental-scale test of a remote sensing and geographic information system methodology for approximating the extent of built-up land and its potential impact on soil resources in the United States. Using image processing techniques and census data, we generated maps where the “city lights” class represented mean population densities of 947 persons km−2 and 392 housing units km−2, areas clearly not available to agriculture. By our analysis, such “city lights” representing urban areas accounted for 2.7% of the surface area in the United States, an area approximately equal to the State of Minnesota or one half the size of California. Using the UN/FAO Fertility Capability Classification System to rank soils, results for the United States show that development appears to be following soil resources, with the better agricultural soils being the most urbanized. Some unique soil types appear to be on the verge of being entirely coopted by “urban sprawl.” Urban area figures derived from the DMSP/OLS imagery compare well to those derived from statistical sources. Further testing and refinement of the methodology remain but the technique shows promise for possible extension to global evaluations of urbanization, population and even global productivity.
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ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 496
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