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Author Stathakis, D.; Tselios, V.; Faraslis, I.
Title (down) Urbanization in European regions based on night lights Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment
Volume 2 Issue Pages 26-34
Keywords remote sensing
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2352-9385 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1297
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Author Orlando, L.; Ortega, L.; Defeo, O.
Title (down) Urbanization effects on sandy beach macrofauna along an estuarine gradient Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators
Volume 111 Issue Pages in press
Keywords Ecology
Abstract The rapid urban population growth and coastal infrastructure development worldwide add dimensionality and complexity to the management process in sandy shores, and therefore the development of beach quality indices that take into account the increasing role of urbanization are particularly relevant. This work analyses the potential of human population density (HPD), nighttime lights and vegetation cover as indicators of urban impact on sandy beach biodiversity. Each indicator was tested against a large-scale 2-yr study of macrofaunal richness and physical characteristics along a strong environmental gradient defined by the widest estuary of the world, the Rio de la Plata. A negative linear relationship between HPD and the number of species was found. The amount of light recorded at night peaked at the most urbanized area in the coast, Montevideo city, and showed a negative relationship with macrofaunal richness. Vegetation cover, expressed through a normalized difference vegetation index, showed a weak positive relationship with species richness. Multiple linear regressions, combining urban indicators and physical characteristics as explanatory variables of macrofaunal richness, showed the best results when HPD and salinity range were combined. A regression tree explained 65% of deviance and had a structure coherent with previous results. Salinity was the dominant ecological driver: beaches with salinity ≥27.2 showed higher species richness, while beaches with less salinity and higher nighttime lights showed the lowest species richness. Random Forests selected salinity (mean and range) and HPD as the most informative variables to discriminate groups of beaches according to their macrobenthic richness. These results reflect that the salinity gradient is a macroscale driver that shapes species richness patterns along this coast, whereas the effects of urbanization are confined within the dominant large-scale environmental gradient. The identification of suitable urban indicators provided in this work constitutes the first step onto the development of more rigorous approaches to assess this globally relevant and long-lasting stressor.
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ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2819
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Goymann, W.; Helm, B.; Partecke, J.
Title (down) Urban-like night illumination reduces melatonin release in European blackbirds (Turdus merula): implications of city life for biological time-keeping of songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Frontiers in Zoology Abbreviated Journal Front Zool
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 60
Keywords European blackbirds; birds; Turdus merula; animals; melatonin; *Photoperiod
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light-at-night is known to affect a broad array of behaviours and physiological processes. In urbanized bird species, light-at-night advances important biological rhythms such as daily cycles of activity/rest and timing of reproduction, but our knowledge of the underlying physiological mechanisms is limited. Given its role as chronobiological signal, melatonin is a strong candidate for mediating the effects of light-at-night. RESULTS: We exposed urban and rural European blackbirds (Turdus merula) to two light treatments equal in photoperiod but with different light intensities at night. The control group was exposed to 0.0001 lux (almost darkness), while the experimental group was exposed to 0.3 lux at night, simulating conditions recorded previously on free-living urban blackbirds. We obtained diel profiles of plasma melatonin for all birds in summer (July) and winter (January), while simultaneously recording locomotor activity. Daily patterns of melatonin concentrations were clearly affected by light-at-night in both seasons. In winter, melatonin concentrations of light-at-night birds were lower in the early and late night than in those of birds kept in darkness. In summer, melatonin concentrations of the light-at-night birds were lower through all night compared to birds kept in darkness. Locomotor activity in light-at-night birds was overall higher than in control individuals, both during the day and at night, and it increased sharply before dawn. In winter, the amount of activity before dawn in the light-at-night group correlated with changes in melatonin from midnight to late night: the greater the decrease in melatonin, the greater the amount of pre-dawn activity. Urban and rural birds responded similarly to light-at-night with respect to melatonin, but differed in their behaviour, with rural birds showing more locomotor activity than urban counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: This study points to reduced melatonin release at night as a potential physiological mechanism underlying the advanced onset of morning activity of urbanized birds. Based on the pattern of melatonin secretion, we suggest that birds responded to light-at-night as if they were exposed to a longer day than birds kept under dark nights.
Address Department of Migration and Immuno-ecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Radolfzell, Germany. ddominoni@orn.mpg.de
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1742-9994 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24090446; PMCID:PMC3850952 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 41
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Author Ratnasari, N.; Candra, E.D.; Saputra, D.H.; Perdana, A.P.
Title (down) Urban Spatial Pattern and Interaction based on Analysis of Nighttime Remote Sensing Data and Geo-social Media Information Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.
Volume 47 Issue Pages 012038
Keywords remote sensing; geo-social media; spatial pattern; spatial interaction; urban; Indonesia
Abstract Urban development in Indonesia significantly increasing in line with rapid development of infrastructure, utility, and transportation network. Recently, people live depend on lights at night and social media and these two aspects can depicted urban spatial pattern and interaction. This research used nighttime remote sensing data with the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) day-night band detects lights, gas flares, auroras, and wildfires. Geo-social media information derived from twitter data gave big picture on spatial interaction from the geospatial footprint. Combined both data produced comprehensive urban spatial pattern and interaction in general for Indonesian territory. The result is shown as a preliminary study of integrating nighttime remote sensing data and geospatial footprint from twitter data.
Address Undergraduate Program of Cartography and Remote Sensing, Department of Geographic Information Science, Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia; nila.ratnasari(at)mail.ugm.ac.id
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1755-1307 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1653
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Author Supronowicz, R.; Fryc, I.
Title (down) Urban park lighting as a source of botanical light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Photonics Letters of Poland Abbreviated Journal Photon.Lett.PL
Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 90
Keywords Plants
Abstract That paper describesthe relative impact of anartificial lighting deviceon botanical light pollution, consideringspectral power distribution (SPD in the lighting area. This impact is described by the Relative-to-Moon Photosynthesis Index (RMPI)and Induced Phytochrome Index (IPr). We found that in the case when lighting is realized by using LED luminaires instead of high-pressure sodium (HPS) or metal halide (MH) lamps, the influence of spectral light on plant vegetation process amplifies. Additionally,our research shows that estimating botanical light pollution on the basis of lamps’CCT is not the best method and that using SPD is better for this purpose.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2080-2242 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2691
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