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Author Ouyang, J.Q.; de Jong, M.; van Grunsven, R.H.; Matson, K.D.; Haussmann, M.F.; Meerlo, P.; Visser, M.; Spoelstra, K.
Title (down) What type of rigorous experiments are needed to investigate the impact of artificial light at night on individuals and populations? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages e9-e10
Keywords Animals
Abstract In our recent paper on how artificial light at night (ALAN) affects within-individual changes in physiology, we used a unique experimental setup of colored LED lights to show effects on nighttime activity levels and physiology in free-living great tits, Parus major (Ouyang et al., 2017). Raap et al's response, entitled: “Rigorous field experiments are essential to understand the genuine severity of light pollution and to identify possible solutions” lists issues with our analyses (Raap et al., 2017). Rather than go into a detailed response, we use this forum to address the major critiques by answering the bigger question of what types of rigorous field experiments are needed to evaluate ALAN's impact. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address P.O. box 50, 6700 AB, Wageningen, Gelderland Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28886232 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1721
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Author Marchant, P.R.
Title (down) What is the contribution of street lighting to keeping us safe? An investigation into a policy. Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Radical Statistics Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 102 Pages 32-42
Keywords Public Safety
Abstract Lighting of roads is said to be of benefit beyond giving the ability to be

able to see in the dark. It is claimed for example that lighting reduces

crime and traffic accidents by a considerable amount and it is

therefore necessary to have it for these reasons. My view remains that

this claim lacks evidence of a sufficiently high standard to warrant

using public safety as an argument. On the other hand there are

reasons why having a lot of light at night might be a bad thing. This

work continues a previous talk and article for Radical Statistics

(Marchant 2006)

My initial interest in this area was sparked through my interest in

astronomy because light pollution makes it hard to appreciate the

wonders of the night sky. It seemed to me that the belief that lighting

reduces crime was questionable…. I then embarked on investigating

the crime reduction claim and found it suspect, as detailed in the

2006 Radical Statistics article. (See also Marchant 2004, 2005, 2007,

2009)
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 450
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Author Blood, W.H.
Title (down) What is street lighting? Type Journal Article
Year 1907 Publication Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue Pages 633-644
Keywords Lighting; History
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2742
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Author Sliney, D.H.
Title (down) What is light? The visible spectrum and beyond Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; human vision; spectrum; electromagnetic spectrum; visible; *Ultraviolet Rays; light
Abstract In this International Year of Light, it is particularly appropriate to review the historical concept of what is light and the controversies surrounding the extent of the visible spectrum. Today we recognize that light possesses both a wave and particle nature. It is also clear that the limits of visibility really extend from about 310 nm in the ultraviolet (in youth) to about 1100 nm in the near-infrared, but depend very much on the radiance, that is, 'brightness' of the light source. The spectral content of artificial lighting are undergoing very significant changes in our lifetime, and the full biological implications of the spectral content of newer lighting technologies remain to be fully explored.
Address Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26768917 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1337
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Author Schulte-Römer, N.
Title (down) What is French about the “French fear of darkness”? The co-production of imagined communities of light and energy Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Energy History Revue d'Histoire de l'Energie Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue Pages
Keywords History; Society; Energy; Lighting; France
Abstract This essay takes expert assumptions about light preferences as a starting point for a historical inquiry into what I call imagined sociotechnical communities of light and energy. My argument is that historical energy supply systems produced these imaginaries and vice versa, shifting the scales at which public lighting was envisioned and darkness was acceptable. While in the 17th C. dark streets were the norm and even the illumination of single streets was publically contested, innovators of the 18th C. imagined gas light and energy on an urban scale. In the 20th C., electric lighting promoted electrification and the electricity supply systems in countries like France allowed experts to think and standardize lighting at a national level. In the 21st C. the expert imaginary of a light-loving French people is challenged by public environmental concern.
Address Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Germany
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2709
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