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Author Marchant, P.R.
Title (down) What is the contribution of street lighting to keeping us safe? An investigation into a policy. Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Radical Statistics Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 102 Pages 32-42
Keywords Public Safety
Abstract Lighting of roads is said to be of benefit beyond giving the ability to be

able to see in the dark. It is claimed for example that lighting reduces

crime and traffic accidents by a considerable amount and it is

therefore necessary to have it for these reasons. My view remains that

this claim lacks evidence of a sufficiently high standard to warrant

using public safety as an argument. On the other hand there are

reasons why having a lot of light at night might be a bad thing. This

work continues a previous talk and article for Radical Statistics

(Marchant 2006)

My initial interest in this area was sparked through my interest in

astronomy because light pollution makes it hard to appreciate the

wonders of the night sky. It seemed to me that the belief that lighting

reduces crime was questionable…. I then embarked on investigating

the crime reduction claim and found it suspect, as detailed in the

2006 Radical Statistics article. (See also Marchant 2004, 2005, 2007,

2009)
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 450
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Author Blood, W.H.
Title (down) What is street lighting? Type Journal Article
Year 1907 Publication Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue Pages 633-644
Keywords Lighting; History
Abstract
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2742
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Author Sliney, D.H.
Title (down) What is light? The visible spectrum and beyond Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; human vision; spectrum; electromagnetic spectrum; visible; *Ultraviolet Rays; light
Abstract In this International Year of Light, it is particularly appropriate to review the historical concept of what is light and the controversies surrounding the extent of the visible spectrum. Today we recognize that light possesses both a wave and particle nature. It is also clear that the limits of visibility really extend from about 310 nm in the ultraviolet (in youth) to about 1100 nm in the near-infrared, but depend very much on the radiance, that is, 'brightness' of the light source. The spectral content of artificial lighting are undergoing very significant changes in our lifetime, and the full biological implications of the spectral content of newer lighting technologies remain to be fully explored.
Address Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26768917 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1337
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Author Schulte-Römer, N.
Title (down) What is French about the “French fear of darkness”? The co-production of imagined communities of light and energy Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Energy History Revue d'Histoire de l'Energie Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue Pages
Keywords History; Society; Energy; Lighting; France
Abstract This essay takes expert assumptions about light preferences as a starting point for a historical inquiry into what I call imagined sociotechnical communities of light and energy. My argument is that historical energy supply systems produced these imaginaries and vice versa, shifting the scales at which public lighting was envisioned and darkness was acceptable. While in the 17th C. dark streets were the norm and even the illumination of single streets was publically contested, innovators of the 18th C. imagined gas light and energy on an urban scale. In the 20th C., electric lighting promoted electrification and the electricity supply systems in countries like France allowed experts to think and standardize lighting at a national level. In the 21st C. the expert imaginary of a light-loving French people is challenged by public environmental concern.
Address Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Germany
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2709
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Author Mayoral, O.; Solbes, J.; Cantó, J.; Pina, T.
Title (down) What Has Been Thought and Taught on the Lunar Influence on Plants in Agriculture? Perspective from Physics and Biology Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Agronomy Abbreviated Journal Agronomy
Volume 10 Issue 7 Pages 955
Keywords Moonlight; Plants
Abstract This paper reviews the beliefs which drive some agricultural sectors to consider the lunar influence as either a stress or a beneficial factor when it comes to organizing their tasks. To address the link between lunar phases and agriculture from a scientific perspective, we conducted a review of textbooks and monographs used to teach agronomy, botany, horticulture and plant physiology; we also consider the physics that address the effects of the Moon on our planet. Finally, we review the scientific literature on plant development, specifically searching for any direct or indirect reference to the influence of the Moon on plant physiology. We found that there is no reliable, science-based evidence for any relationship between lunar phases and plant physiology in any plant–science related textbooks or peer-reviewed journal articles justifying agricultural practices conditioned by the Moon. Nor does evidence from the field of physics support a causal relationship between lunar forces and plant responses. Therefore, popular agricultural practices that are tied to lunar phases have no scientific backing. We strongly encourage teachers involved in plant sciences education to objectively address pseudo-scientific ideas and promote critical thinking.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4395 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3036
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