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Author Nurbandi, W.; Yusuf, F.R.; Prasetya, R.; Afrizal, M.D.
Title (down) Using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Imagery to identify and analyze light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.
Volume 47 Issue Pages 012040
Keywords Remote Sensing; Indonesia; VIIRS; VIIRS-DNB; ground validation; Yogyakarta
Abstract Light pollution is any adverse effect of artificial lighting including sky glow, glare, light trespass, light clutter, decreased visibility at night, and energy waste. Remote sensing is the acquisition of information about an object or phenomenon without making physical contact with the object. Remote sensing can be used for identification of light pollution. The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze the light pollution by using remote sensing imagery. This study uses VIIRS DNB Free Cloud Composites imagery to identify light pollution in Yogyakarta province and surrounding areas. VIIRS imagery which obtained is processed to get information of light pollution by classifying the information into several classes presented in a map. Selected few sample points as test sites to determine the actual condition. Field work conducted at theree location, they are Yogyakarta City, Depok Beach, and Gajah Mungkur reservoir. Night sky condition analysis conducted field tests as well as night time shooting the night sky conditions. Analysis of the night sky conditions are calculated qualitatively using Bortle Dark-Sky Scale with a value range of 1-9. Field test results show that Yogyakarta City has a value of 8, Depok has a value of 3, and Gajah Mungkur Reservoir has a value of 4. The conclusion of study is VIIRS imagery can be used for identification light pollution and calculation analysis of light pollution can use Bortle Dark-Sky Scale.
Address Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; wahyunurbandi.ipa130 (at) gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1755-1307 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1652
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Author Mann, M.; Melaas, E.; Malik, A.
Title (down) Using VIIRS Day/Night Band to Measure Electricity Supply Reliability: Preliminary Results from Maharashtra, India Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 8 Issue 9 Pages 711
Keywords Remote Sensing; NPP-VIIRS; VIIRS-DNB; India; South Asia
Abstract Unreliable electricity supplies are common in developing countries and impose large socio-economic costs, yet precise information on electricity reliability is typically unavailable. This paper presents preliminary results from a machine-learning approach for using satellite imagery of nighttime lights to develop estimates of electricity reliability for western India at a finer spatial scale. We use data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) satellite together with newly-available data from networked household voltage meters. Our results point to the possibilities of this approach as well as areas for refinement. With currently available training data, we find a limited ability to detect individual outages identified by household-level measurements of electricity voltage. This is likely due to the relatively small number of individual outages observed in our preliminary data. However, we find that the approach can estimate electricity reliability rates for individual locations fairly well, with the predicted versus actual regression yielding an R2 > 0.5. We also find that, despite the after midnight overpass time of the SNPP satellite, the reliability estimates derived are representative of daytime reliability.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1515
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Author Aubé, M.; Kocifaj, M.
Title (down) Using two light-pollution models to investigate artificial sky radiances at Canary Islands observatories: Light-pollution models and artificial sky radiances Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 422 Issue 1 Pages 819-830
Keywords Keywords: radiative transfer; atmospheric effects; light pollution; methods: observational; site testing
Abstract Astronomical observations are increasingly limited by light pollution, which is a product of the over-illumination of the night sky. To predict both the angular distribution of scattered light and the ground-reaching radiative fluxes, a set of models has been introduced in recent decades. Two distinct numerical tools, MSNsRAu and ILLUMINA, are compared in this paper, with the aim of identifying their strengths and weaknesses. The numerical experiment comprises the simulation of spectral radiances in the region of the Canary Islands. In particular, the light fields near the Roque de los Muchachos and Teide observatories are computed under various turbidity conditions. It is shown that ILLUMINA has enhanced accuracy at low elevation angles. However, ILLUMINA is time-consuming because of the two scattering orders incorporated into the calculation scheme. Under low-turbidity conditions and for zenith angles smaller than 70° the two models agree well, and thus can be successfully applied to typical cloudless situations at the majority of observatories. MSNsRAu is well optimized for large-scale simulations. In particular, the grid size is adapted dynamically depending on the distance between a light source and a hypothetical observer. This enables rapid numerical modelling for large territories. MSNsRAu is also well suited for the mass modelling of night-sky radiances after ground-based light sources are hypothetically changed. This enables an optimum design of public lighting systems and a time-efficient evaluation of the optical effects related to different lamp spectra or different lamp distributions. ILLUMINA provides two diagnostic geographical maps to help local authorities concerned about light-pollution control. The first map allows the identification of the relative contribution of each ground element to the observed sky radiance at a given viewing angle, while the second map gives the sensitivity, basically saying how each ground element contributes per lumen installed.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 256
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Author Troy, J.R.; Holmes, N.D.; Veech, J.A.; Green, M.C.
Title (down) Using observed seabird fallout records to infer patterns of attraction to artificial light Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Endangered Species Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 225-234
Keywords Animals; Anthropogenic light; GIS-based modeling; Hawaii; Kauai; Light attraction; Procellariiformes; Newell’s shearwater; Seabird conservation
Abstract Attraction of fledgling shearwaters, petrels, and storm-petrels to artificial light has been documented for decades on islands around the world and is considered a significant threat to many species. Although large numbers of downed birds have been observed after being disoriented by light, several important elements of this ‘fallout’ phenomenon are unknown, including the locations along the path from nest to ocean at which attraction and/or disorientation occurs and whether fledglings can be attracted back to land after reaching the ocean in numbers large enough to contribute significantly to fallout. To investigate these questions, we compared observed Newell’s shearwater Puffinus newelli fallout records (from 1998 to 2009) on Kauai, USA, with expected numbers generated from several hypothetical models containing basic assumptions related to fledgling movement and attraction to light. Based on our results, the spatial pattern of observed fallout is consistent with the amount of light that fledglings may view along their first flights to and beyond the coastline. This suggests that even fledglings from dark regions of the island may not be safe because they may view light after reaching the ocean and still be susceptible to attraction. These findings support recent modeling efforts predicting that most birds fledging from Kauai are likely exposed to at least some anthropogenic light. As nocturnal use of light by humans is unlikely to be eliminated, research on the types of artificial light that are both useful to humans and safe for seabirds may be crucial for the conservation of these important marine animals.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 383
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Author Newman, R.C.; Ellis, T.; Davison, P.I.; Ives, M.J.; Thomas, R.J.; Griffiths, S.W.; Riley, W.D.
Title (down) Using novel methodologies to examine the impact of artificial light at night on the cortisol stress response in dispersing Atlantic salmon (Salmo salarL.) fry Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Physiol
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages cov051
Keywords Animals; salmon; Salmo salar; Artificial light at night; Atlantic salmon; cortisol
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is gaining recognition as having an important anthropogenic impact on the environment, yet the behavioural and physiological impacts of this stressor are largely unknown. This dearth of information is particularly true for freshwater ecosystems, which are already heavily impacted by anthropogenic pressures. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) is a species of conservation and economic importance whose ecology and behaviour is well studied, making it an ideal model species. Recent investigations have demonstrated that salmon show disrupted behaviour in response to artificial light; however, it is not yet clear which physiological processes are behind the observed behavioural modifications. Here, two novel non-invasive sampling methods were used to examine the cortisol stress response of dispersing salmon fry under different artificial lighting intensities. Fish egg and embryos were reared under differing ALAN intensities and individual measures of stress were subsequently taken from dispersing fry using static sampling, whereas population-level measures were achieved using deployed passive samplers. Dispersing fry exposed to experimental confinement showed elevated cortisol levels, indicating the capacity to mount a stress response at this early stage in ontogenesis. However, only one of the two methods for sampling cortisol used in this study indicated that ALAN may act as a stressor to dispersing salmon fry. As such, a cortisol-mediated response to light was not strongly supported. Furthermore, the efficacy of the two non-invasive methodologies used in this study is, subject to further validation, indicative of them proving useful in future ecological studies.
Address School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 2920 875 729; newmanrc(at)cardiff.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2051-1434 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1397
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