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Author Gresson, R.A.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) XXV.—The Effect of Increased Daily Illumination and of Reversed Day and Night on the Œstrus Cycle of the Mouse (Mus musculus) Type Journal Article
  Year 1940 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. Edinb.  
  Volume 60 Issue 03 Pages 333-343  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0370-1646 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2398  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Tong, K.P.; Bennie, J.; Birriel, I.; Birriel, J.J.; Cool, A.; Danielsen, A.; Davies, T.W.; Outer, P.N. den; Edwards, W.; Ehlert, R.; Falchi, F.; Fischer, J.; Giacomelli, A.; Giubbilini, F.; Haaima, M.; Hesse, C.; Heygster, G.; Hölker, F.; Inger, R.; Jensen, L.J.; Kuechly, H.U.; Kuehn, J.; Langill, P.; Lolkema, D.E.; Nagy, M.; Nievas, M.; Ochi, N.; Popow, E.; Posch, T.; Puschnig, J.; Ruhtz, T.; Schmidt, W.; Schwarz, R.; Schwope, A.; Spoelstra, H.; Tekatch, A.; Trueblood, M.; Walker, C.E.; Weber, M.; Welch, D.L.; Zamorano, J.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Worldwide variations in artificial skyglow Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci. Rep.  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 8409  
  Keywords Skyglow; light pollution; measurements; remote sensing; sky brightness; calibration  
  Abstract Despite constituting a widespread and significant environmental change, understanding of artificial nighttime skyglow is extremely limited. Until now, published monitoring studies have been local or regional in scope, and typically of short duration. In this first major international compilation of monitoring data we answer several key questions about skyglow properties. Skyglow is observed to vary over four orders of magnitude, a range hundreds of times larger than was the case before artificial light. Nearly all of the study sites were polluted by artificial light. A non-linear relationship is observed between the sky brightness on clear and overcast nights, with a change in behavior near the rural to urban landuse transition. Overcast skies ranged from a third darker to almost 18 times brighter than clear. Clear sky radiances estimated by the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness were found to be overestimated by ~25%; our dataset will play an important role in the calibration and ground truthing of future skyglow models. Most of the brightly lit sites darkened as the night progressed, typically by ~5% per hour. The great variation in skyglow radiance observed from site-to-site and with changing meteorological conditions underlines the need for a long-term international monitoring program.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute for Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1103  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Guetté, A.; Godet, L.; Juigner, M.; Robin, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Worldwide increase in Artificial Light At Night around protected areas and within biodiversity hotspots Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 223 Issue Pages 97-103  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Ecology; Conservation  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) has several adverse impacts on biodiversity, and it has been recently used as a proxy to monitor human encroachment on landscapes at large spatial scales. The extent to which ALAN affects protected areas (PAs) and biodiversity hotspots (BHs) remains however untested at large spatial scales. We used this proxy to assess the spatial and temporal trends in the anthropization at a global scale within and around PAs and BHs. We found that ALAN is low and stable over time within PAs, but is the highest in a first outer belt (<25 km) around PAs, and tends to increase in a second outer belt (25–75 km). In the meantime, ALAN is higher within BHs than outside, and is even the highest and increasing over time in an inner belt, close to their periphery. Our results suggest that although PAs are creating safety zones in terms of ALAN, they tend to be more and more isolated from each other by a concentric human encroachment. In contrast, BHs are submitted to an increasing human pressure, especially in their inner periphery. Overall, we suggest integrating ALAN in large-scale conservation policies.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1890  
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Author Peden, M.; Scurfield, R.; Sleet, D.; Mohan, D.; Hyder, A. A.; Jarawan, E.; Mathers, C. url  openurl
  Title (down) World report on road traffic injury prevention. Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 645  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Levin, N.; Ali, S.; Crandall, D.; Kark, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) World Heritage in danger: Big data and remote sensing can help protect sites in conflict zones Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Global Environmental Change Abbreviated Journal Global Environmental Change  
  Volume 55 Issue Pages 97-104  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract World Heritage sites provide a key mechanism for protecting areas of universal importance. However, fifty-four UNESCO sites are currently listed as “In Danger”, with 40% of these located in the Middle East. Since 2010 alone, thirty new sites were identified as under risk globally. We combined big-data and remote sensing to examine whether they can effectively be used to identify danger to World Heritage in near real-time. We found that armed-conflicts substantially threaten both natural- and cultural-heritage listed sites. Other major risks include poor management and development (globally), poaching (Africa mostly) and deforestation (tropics), yet conflict is the most prominent threat. We show that news-mining of big-data on conflicts and remote sensing of nights-lights enabled us to identify conflict afflicted areas in near real-time. These findings provide a crucial avenue for developing a global transparent early-warning system before irreversible damage to world heritage takes place.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0959-3780 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2279  
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