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Author Moore, C. url  openurl
  Title (down) Visual Estimations of Night Sky Brightness Type Conference Article
  Year 2001 Publication The George Wright Forum Abbreviated Journal The George Wright Forum  
  Volume 18 Issue 4 Pages 46-55  
  Keywords Skyglow; sky brightness; visual observations  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher George Wright Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1655  
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Author Mace, B.L.; McDaniel, J. url  openurl
  Title (down) Visitor Evaluation of Night Sky Interpretation in Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Interpretation Research Abbreviated Journal J. of Interp. Res.  
  Volume 18 Issue 2 Pages 39-57  
  Keywords parks; interpretation; social studies; Bryce Canyon National Park; Cedar Breaks National Monument; dark skies  
  Abstract Natural lightscapes are an important resource for parks and protected areas, including Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument. Both locations offer night sky interpretive programs, attracting over 27,000 visitors annually, equaling all other interpretive programs combined. Parks need to understand what drives visitor interest and park managers need to assess if night sky interpretation is meeting expectations. A total of 1,179 night and day visitors to Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument served as participants and completed a 36-item survey measuring knowledge, attitudes, benefits, and behaviors related to the night sky. Results show those who attended a night sky interpretive program gained a significant amount of knowledge about night sky issues. Both day and night visitors have strongly held attitudes about light pollution and the protection of the night sky in national parks.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT 84720 USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 374  
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Author Zele, A.J.; Cao, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Vision under mesopic and scotopic illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Psychology Abbreviated Journal Front Psychol  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 1594  
  Keywords vision; color; cones; mesopic; photopic; rods; scotopic; temporal  
  Abstract Evidence has accumulated that rod activation under mesopic and scotopic light levels alters visual perception and performance. Here we review the most recent developments in the measurement of rod and cone contributions to mesopic color perception and temporal processing, with a focus on data measured using a four-primary photostimulator method that independently controls rod and cone excitations. We discuss the findings in the context of rod inputs to the three primary retinogeniculate pathways to understand rod contributions to mesopic vision. Additionally, we present evidence that hue perception is possible under scotopic, pure rod-mediated conditions that involves cortical mechanisms.  
  Address Visual Perception Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago Chicago, IL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-1078 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25657632; PMCID:PMC4302711 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1180  
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Author Warrant, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Vision in the dimmest habitats on earth Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol  
  Volume 190 Issue 10 Pages 765-789  
  Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; *Darkness; Eye/anatomy & histology; Fishes/physiology; Invertebrates; Oceans and Seas; Ocular Physiological Phenomena; Orientation/physiology; Space Perception/physiology; Vision, Ocular/*physiology  
  Abstract A very large proportion of the world's animal species are active in dim light, either under the cover of night or in the depths of the sea. The worlds they see can be dim and extended, with light reaching the eyes from all directions at once, or they can be composed of bright point sources, like the multitudes of stars seen in a clear night sky or the rare sparks of bioluminescence that are visible in the deep sea. The eye designs of nocturnal and deep-sea animals have evolved in response to these two very different types of habitats, being optimised for maximum sensitivity to extended scenes, or to point sources, or to both. After describing the many visual adaptations that have evolved across the animal kingdom for maximising sensitivity to extended and point-source scenes, I then use case studies from the recent literature to show how these adaptations have endowed nocturnal animals with excellent vision. Nocturnal animals can see colour and negotiate dimly illuminated obstacles during flight. They can also navigate using learned terrestrial landmarks, the constellations of stars or the dim pattern of polarised light formed around the moon. The conclusion from these studies is clear: nocturnal habitats are just as rich in visual details as diurnal habitats are, and nocturnal animals have evolved visual systems capable of exploiting them. The same is certainly true of deep-sea animals, as future research will no doubt reveal.  
  Address Vision Group, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden. Eric.Warrant@cob.lu.se  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-7594 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:15375626 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 33  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Orbach, D.N.; Fenton, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Vision impairs the abilities of bats to avoid colliding with stationary obstacles Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 5 Issue 11 Pages e13912  
  Keywords Analysis of Variance; Animals; Chiroptera/*physiology; Cyclonic Storms; Echolocation/*physiology; Female; Flight, Animal/*physiology; Light; Male; Space Perception/physiology/radiation effects; Vision, Ocular/*physiology/radiation effects; Vocalization, Animal/physiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Free-flying insectivorous bats occasionally collide with stationary objects they should easily detect by echolocation and avoid. Collisions often occur with lighted objects, suggesting ambient light may deleteriously affect obstacle avoidance capabilities. We tested the hypothesis that free-flying bats may orient by vision when they collide with some obstacles. We additionally tested whether acoustic distractions, such as “distress calls” of other bats, contributed to probabilities of collision. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the role of visual cues in the collisions of free-flying little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with stationary objects, we set up obstacles in an area of high bat traffic during swarming. We used combinations of light intensities and visually dissimilar obstacles to verify that bats orient by vision. In early August, bats collided more often in the light than the dark, and probabilities of collision varied with the visibility of obstacles. However, the probabilities of collisions altered in mid to late August, coincident with the start of behavioural, hormonal, and physiological changes occurring during swarming and mating. Distress calls did not distract bats and increase the incidence of collisions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that visual cues are more important for free-flying bats than previously recognized, suggesting integration of multi-sensory modalities during orientation. Furthermore, our study highlights differences between responses of captive and wild bats, indicating a need for more field experiments.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. dnorbach@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21085481; PMCID:PMC2976695 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 96  
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