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Author Hauptfleisch, M.; Dalton, C.
Title (up) Arthropod phototaxis and its possible effect on bird strike risk at two Namibian airports Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Applied Ecology and Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Appl. Ecol. & Environ. Res.
Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 957-965
Keywords Animals; airport; arthropods; birds; bird strike; phototaxis; Lepidoptera; Namibia
Abstract Aircraft wildlife collisions are a global safety and financial problem for the aviation industry, with birds being the main concern. In Namibia, 97% of collisions at Namibia’s two main airports are reported to be with insectivorous birds. Phototaxis was identified as a major attractant to insectivorous

birds, which feed on the arthropods attracted to airport apron and terminal lights. This study considered the effect of light as an attraction at the rurally situated Hosea Kutako International and urban Eros airports. It further investigated the attractiveness of light colour (or wavelength) on arthropod abundance, biomass and diversity. The study found that phototaxis was a significant factor at Hosea Kutako only, and that white light was the main attractant for arthropods, specifically for large moths (Order Lepidoptera),

while yellow and orange light attracted significantly less arthropods. The study indicates a high likelihood that the Hosea Kutako apron lights (white) are an important attractant for arthropods, and therefore indirectly insectivorous birds, which can be reduced by replacing them with orange or yellow filters.
Address Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources Sciences, Polytechnic of Namibia, Private Bag 13388, Windhoek, Namibia; mhauptfleisch@polytechnic.edu.na
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Publisher Aloki Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1160
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Author Russo, D.; Cosentino, F.; Festa, F.; De Benedetta, F.; Pejic, B.; Cerretti, P.; Ancillotto, L.
Title (up) Artificial illumination near rivers may alter bat-insect trophic interactions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 252 Issue Pt B Pages 1671-1677
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial illumination at night represents an increasingly concerning threat to ecosystems worldwide, altering persistence, behaviour, physiology and fitness of many organisms and their mutual interactions, in the long-term affecting ecosystem functioning. Bats are very sensitive to artificial light at night because they are obligate nocturnal and feed on insects which are often also responsive to lights. Here we tested the effects of LED lighting on prey-predator interactions at riverine ecosystems, using bats and their insect prey as models, and compared bat and insect reactions in terms of bat activity and prey insect abundance and diversity, respectively, on artificially lit vs. unlit nights. Artificial light influenced both insect and bat assemblages in taxon-specific directions: insect abundances increased at lit sites, particularly due to an increase in small dipterans near the light source. Composition of insect assemblages also differed significantly between lit and unlit sites. Total bat activity declined at lit sites, but this change was mainly due to the response of the most abundant species, Myotis daubentonii, while opportunistic species showed no reaction or even an opposite pattern (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We show that artificial lighting along rivers may affect trophic interactions between bats and insects, resulting in a profound alteration of community structure and dynamics.
Address Wildlife Research Unit, Dipartimento di Agraria, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Universita, 100, 80055, Portici, Italy
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31284209 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2572
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Author Bengsen, Andrew J; Leung, Luke K P; Lapidge, Steven J; Gordon, Iain J
Title (up) Artificial illumination reduces bait-take by small rainforest mammals Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 127 Issue 1-2 Pages 66-72
Keywords animals; field experiment; predation risk
Abstract Small mammals often moderate their foraging behaviour in response to cues indicating a high local predation risk. We assessed the ability of cues associated with a high predation risk to reduce the consumption of bait by non-target small mammal species in a tropical rainforest, without inhibiting bait-take by feral pigs (Sus scrofa). The illumination of feeding stations with a low power light source caused small mammals to reduce their foraging intensity on sunflower seeds mixed through sand by 25% (P< 0.001) and on unprocessed corn-based feral pig bait by 80% (P< 0.001). Illumination also reduced the intensity with which small mammals fed on commercially manufactured baits (odds ratio. = 6.17, P= 0.009). Illumination did not cause pigs to reduce their intake of corn bait (P= 0.43). Neither pig nor dingo (Canis lupus dingo) vocalisations had any detectable effect on the foraging intensity of small mammals (P> 0.05 for all treatments). We conclude that site illumination was an effective method of selectively deterring small mammals from consuming feral pig baits in our study region, but had no effect on consumption of those baits by pigs.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1577
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Author Davies, T.W.; Bennie, J.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.
Title (up) Artificial light alters natural regimes of night-time sky brightness Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci. Rep.
Volume 3 Issue Pages
Keywords Artificial light; light at nightl skyglow; measurements
Abstract Artificial light is globally one of the most widely distributed forms of anthropogenic pollution. However, while both the nature and ecological effects of direct artificial lighting are increasingly well documented, those of artificial sky glow have received little attention. We investigated how city lights alter natural regimes of lunar sky brightness using a novel ten month time series of measurements recorded across a gradient of increasing light pollution. In the city, artificial lights increased sky brightness to levels six times above those recorded in rural locations, nine and twenty kilometers away. Artificial lighting masked natural monthly and seasonal regimes of lunar sky brightness in the city, and increased the number and annual regime of full moon equivalent hours available to organisms during the night. The changes have potentially profound ecological consequences.
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 255
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Author Ford, S.; Kidd, P.; Nashand, K.; Rietveld, A.
Title (up) ARTIFICIAL LIGHT AND MOTH BIODIVERSITY: A COMPARISON OF MOTH DIVERSITY ACROSS DIFFERENT HABITATS ON LUNDY TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECT OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHT Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Lundy Field Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue Pages 53-68
Keywords Animals; Lundy; Moths
Abstract Moths perform important roles within ecosystems. Behavioural responses to artificial light disrupt adaptive behaviours, causing population declines. Island populations can assess moth population attracted to artificial light, distinct from urbanisation. Here we present results from day counts of moth larvae and nocturnal Skinner light-traps from Lundy. Findings reveal a significant difference between moth population dynamics and species at differing locations.Overall, numbers of individuals and species caught with the UV-light trap were significantly greater than LED sources.These findings can be applied to potential artificial light changes on Lundy, as well as further changes throughout the United Kingdom
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3132
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