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Author Perkin, E.K.; Hölker, F.; Heller, S.; Berghahn, R.
Title (up) Artificial light and nocturnal activity in gammarids Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal PeerJ
Volume 2 Issue Pages e279
Keywords Acclimation; Gammarus; Invertebrate drift; Light pollution; Multispecies freshwater biomonitor
Abstract Artificial light is gaining attention as a potential stressor to aquatic ecosystems. Artificial lights located near streams increase light levels experienced by stream invertebrates and we hypothesized light would depress night drift rates. We also hypothesized that the effect of light on drift rates would decrease over time as the invertebrates acclimated to the new light level over the course of one month's exposure. These hypotheses were tested by placing Gammarus spp. in eight, 75 m x 1 m artificial flumes. One flume was exposed to strong (416 lx) artificial light at night. This strong light created a gradient between 4.19 and 0.04 lx over the neighboring six artificial flumes, while a control flume was completely covered with black plastic at night. Night-time light measurements taken in the Berlin area confirm that half the flumes were at light levels experienced by urban aquatic invertebrates. Surprisingly, no light treatment affected gammarid drift rates. In contrast, physical activity measurements of in situ individually caged G. roeseli showed they increased short-term activity levels in nights of complete darkness and decreased activity levels in brightly lit flumes. Both nocturnal and diurnal drift increased, and day drift rates were unexpectadly higher than nocturnal drift.
Address Umweltbundesamt , Berlin , Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24688857; PMCID:PMC3961812 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 322
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Author Perkin, E.K.; Hölker, F.; Tockner, K.; Richardson, J.S.
Title (up) Artificial light as a disturbance to light-naïve streams Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal Freshw Biol
Volume 59 Issue 11 Pages 2235–2244
Keywords cutthroat trout; drift; invertebrates; light pollution; urbanization; *Fishes; Oncorhynchus clarkii; British Columbia
Abstract Summary

Artificial light at night is prevalent in human-dominated landscapes, and streams in these landscapes can be expected to be affected by artificial lights. We hypothesised that artificial light at night would reduce the activity of aquatic insects, resulting in reduced drift rates, lower fish growth rates and lower leaf litter decomposition rates.

We tested these hypotheses by installing street lights to reaches in four forested, natural streams of coastal British Columbia each paired with a control reach. Cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) are the top predators in these streams and feed mostly on terrestrial and drifting aquatic invertebrates.

We found that the night-time drift of aquatic invertebrates in lit reaches was ˜50% of the drift in dark reaches. However, the density of emerging aquatic insects, the density of insects falling into reaches, leaf litter decomposition rate and the number and growth rate of trout caught were not significantly different between the dark and experimentally lit reaches.

We conclude that, while short-term exposure to artificial light during the summer changes invertebrate behaviour, it does not significantly alter other trophic levels in forested headwater streams. Our results suggest that low levels of artificial light do not strongly influence stream ecosystems, but future research should determine whether this is true for all seasons and longer-term exposure to light.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 361
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Author Levy, O.; Fernandes de Barros Marangoni, L.; Cohen, J.I.; Rottier, C.; Béraud, E.; Grover, R.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.
Title (up) Artificial light at night (ALAN) alters the physiology and biochemistry of symbiotic reef building corals Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 266 Issue Pages 114987
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Artificial Light at Night (ALAN), which is the alteration of natural light levels as the result of anthropogenic light sources, has been acknowledged as an important factor that alters the functioning of marine ecosystems. Using LEDs light to mimic ALAN, we studied the effect on the physiology (symbiont and chlorophyll contents, photosynthesis, respiration, pigment profile, skeletal growth, and oxidative stress responses) of two scleractinian coral species originating from the Red Sea. ALAN induced the photoinhibition of symbiont photosynthesis, as well as an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and an increase in oxidative damage to lipids in both coral species. The extent of the deleterious effects of ALAN on the symbiotic association and coral physiology was aligned with the severity of the oxidative stress condition experienced by the corals. The coral species Sylophora pistillata, which experienced a more severe oxidative stress condition than the other species tested, Turbinaria reniformis, also showed a more pronounced bleaching (loss of symbionts and chlorophyll content), enhanced photoinhibition and decreased photosynthetic rates. Findings of the present study further our knowledge on the biochemical mechanisms underpinning the deleterious impacts of ALAN on scleractinian corals, ultimately shedding light on the emerging threat of ALAN on coral reef ecology. Further, considering that global warming and light pollution will increase in the next few decades, future studies should be taken to elucidate the potential synergetic effects of ALAN and global climate change stressors.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2982
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Author Rybnikova, N.; Haim, A.; Portnov, B.A.
Title (up) Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) and breast cancer incidence worldwide: A revisit of earlier findings with analysis of current trends Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 32 Issue 6 Pages 757-773
Keywords Human Health
Abstract In a study published in Cancer Causes & Control in 2010, Kloog with co-authors tested, apparently for the first time, the association between population-level ambient exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) and incidence of several cancers in women from 164 countries worldwide. The study was based on 1996-2002 data and concluded that breast cancer (BC) incidence was significantly and positively associated with ALAN, while no such association was revealed for other cancer types. An open question, however, remains whether the trends revealed by Kloog and co-authors were time specific or also hold true for more recent data. Using information obtained from the GLOBOCAN, US-DMSP and World Bank's 2002 and 2012 databases, we reanalyzed the strength of association between BC incidence rates in 180 countries worldwide and ALAN, controlling for several country-level predictors, including birth rates, percent of urban population, per capita GDP and electricity consumption. We also compared BC age-standardized rates (ASRs) with multi-annual ALAN measurements, considering potentially different latency periods. Compared with the results of Kloog et al.'s analysis of the year-2002 BC-data, the association between BC and ALAN appears to have weakened overall, becoming statistically insignificant in the year 2012 after being controlled for potential confounders (t < 0.3; p > 0.5). However, when the entire sample of countries was disaggregated into geographic clusters of similarly developed countries, a positive BC-ALAN association re-emerged as statistically significant (t > 2.2; p < 0.01), helping to explain, along with other factors covered by the analysis, about 65-85% of BC ASR variability worldwide, depending on the model type. Although the present analysis reconfirms a positive BC-ALAN association, this association appeared to diverge regionally in recent years, with countries in Western Europe showing the highest levels of such association, while countries in Southeast Asia and Gulf States exhibiting relatively low BC rates against the backdrop of relatively high ALAN levels. This regional stratification may be due to additional protective mechanisms, diminishing BC risks and potentially attributed to the local diet and lifestyles.
Address Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Haifa , Haifa , Israel , and
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26102518 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1232
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Author Leveau, L.M.
Title (up) Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) Is the Main Driver of Nocturnal Feral Pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica) Foraging in Urban Areas Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)
Volume 10 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords Animals; Columba livia; Latin America; artificial light at night; circadian rhythm; noise; temporal homogenization
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is one of the most extreme environmental alterations in urban areas, which drives nocturnal activity in diurnal species. Feral Pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica), a common species in urban centers worldwide, has been observed foraging at night in urban areas. However, the role of ALAN in the nocturnal activity of this species is unknown. Moreover, studies addressing the relationship between ALAN and nocturnal activity of diurnal birds are scarce in the Southern Hemisphere. The objective of this study is to assess the environmental factors associated with nocturnal activity of the Feral Pigeon in Argentinian cities. Environmental conditions were compared between sites where pigeons were seen foraging and randomly selected sites where pigeons were not recorded foraging. Nocturnal foraging by the Feral Pigeon was recorded in three of four surveyed cities. ALAN was positively related to nocturnal foraging activity in Salta and Buenos Aires. The results obtained suggest that urbanization would promote nocturnal activity in Feral Pigeons. Moreover, nocturnal activity was mainly driven by ALAN, which probably alters the circadian rhythm of pigeons.
Address Departamento de Ecologia, Genetica y Evolucion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires – IEGEBA (CONICET – UBA), Ciudad Universitaria, Pab 2, Piso 4, Buenos Aires 1426, Argentina
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32224903 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2876
Permanent link to this record