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Author Yao, J.Q.; Zhai, H.R.; Tang, X.M.; Gao, X.M.; Yang, X.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Amazon Fire Monitoring and Analysis Based on Multi-source Remote Sensing Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.  
  Volume 474 Issue Pages 042025  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In August 2019, a large-scale fire broke out in the Amazon rainforest, bringing serious harm to the ecosystem and human beings. In order to accurately monitor the dynamic change of forest fire in Amazon rainforest and analyse the impact of fire spreading and extinction on the environment, firstly, based on NPP VIIRS data covering the Amazon fire area, the sliding window threshold method is adopted to extract the fire point, and the cause of fire change is monitored and analysed according to the time series. Secondly, based on the time series of CALIPSO data, the vertical distribution changes of atmospheric pollutants in the amazon fire area are analysed, and the comprehensive analysis is carried out by combining NPP VIIRS data. The experimental results show that only NPP VIIRS data is used to predict the fire, and the combination of CALIPSO data can better monitor the forest fire and predict the fire development trend. The combination of optical image and laser radar has greater advantages in dynamic fire monitoring and fire impact analysis. The method described in this paper can provide basic data reference for real-time and accurate prediction of forest fires and provide new ideas for dynamic fire monitoring.  
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  ISSN 1755-1315 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2927  
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Author Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Casasole, G.; Dehnhard, N.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Ambient anthropogenic noise but not light is associated with the ecophysiology of free-living songbird nestlings Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2754  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Urbanization is associated with dramatic increases in noise and light pollution, which affect animal behaviour, physiology and fitness. However, few studies have examined these stressors simultaneously. Moreover, effects of urbanization during early-life may be detrimental but are largely unknown. In developing great tits (Parus major), a frequently-used model species, we determined important indicators of immunity and physiological condition: plasma haptoglobin (Hp) and nitric oxide (NOx) concentration. We also determined fledging mass, an indicator for current health and survival. Associations of ambient noise and light exposure with these indicators were studied. Anthropogenic noise, light and their interaction were unrelated to fledging mass. Nestlings exposed to more noise showed higher plasma levels of Hp but not of NOx. Light was unrelated to Hp and NOx and did not interact with the effect of noise on nestlings' physiology. Increasing levels of Hp are potentially energy demanding and trade-offs could occur with life-history traits, such as survival. Effects of light pollution on nestlings of a cavity-nesting species appear to be limited. Nonetheless, our results suggest that the urban environment, through noise exposure, may entail important physiological costs for developing organisms.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28584270; PMCID:PMC5459827 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2451  
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Ambient Light Exposure and Changes in Obesity Parameters: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJO-KYO Cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume Issue Pages jc20154123  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Previous epidemiological studies have suggested an association between nighttime light levels and the prevalence of obesity, although evidence is limited to cross-sectional studies. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the longitudinal association between ambient light exposure and the subsequent changes in obesity parameters. DESIGN AND PARTCIPANTS: Data from 1,110 elderly participants at baseline (mean age, 71.9 years) and data from 766 at follow-up (median, 21 months) were included in this prospective population-based study. MEASURES: Time-dependent ambient light exposure based on objective measurements and changes in the waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. RESULTS: Multivariable mixed-effect linear regression models showed a significant association between light exposure and the %WHtR gain; this was independent of potential confounders (e.g., caloric intake, physical activity, and sleep/wake parameters). Nighttime or evening exposure to higher light intensity was significantly associated with subsequent %WHtR gain. Morning exposure to a longer time >/=500 lux or nighttime exposure to a longer time <3 lux was significantly associated with subsequent %WHtR loss. These association trends were nearly consistent when the BMI was used as an obesity parameter. Increased nighttime light exposure (mean >/=3 vs. <3 lux) was estimated to correspond to a 10.2% WHtR gain and 10.0% increase in BMI over 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: Ambient light exposure, such as increased nighttime or evening light exposure and decreased morning light exposure, was independently associated with subsequent increases in obesity parameters. Further interventional studies are warranted to establish an optimal controlled lighting environment as a preventive option against obesity.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27383113 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1483  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author He, L.; Páez, A.; Jiao, J.; An, P.; Lu, C.; Mao, W.; Long, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Ambient Population and Larceny-Theft: A Spatial Analysis Using Mobile Phone Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi  
  Volume 9 Issue 6 Pages 342  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Public Safety  
  Abstract In the spatial analysis of crime, the residential population has been a conventional measure of the population at risk. Recent studies suggest that the ambient population is a useful alternative measure of the population at risk that can better capture the activity patterns of a population. However, current studies are limited by the availability of high precision demographic characteristics, such as social activities and the origins of residents. In this research, we use spatially referenced mobile phone data to measure the size and activity patterns of various types of ambient population, and further investigate the link between urban larceny-theft and population with multiple demographic and activity characteristics. A series of crime attractors, generators, and detractors are also considered in the analysis to account for the spatial variation of crime opportunities. The major findings based on a negative binomial model are three-fold. (1) The size of the non-local population and people’s social regularity calculated from mobile phone big data significantly correlate with the spatial variation of larceny-theft. (2) Crime attractors, generators, and detractors, measured by five types of Points of Interest (POIs), significantly depict the criminality of places and impact opportunities for crime. (3) Higher levels of nighttime light are associated with increased levels of larceny-theft. The results have practical implications for linking the ambient population to crime, and the insights are informative for several theories of crime and crime prevention efforts.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2997  
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Author Grant, R.; Halliday, T.; Chadwick, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Amphibians' response to the lunar synodic cycle--a review of current knowledge, recommendations, and implications for conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 53-62  
  Keywords amphibians; circular statistics; light; lunar cycle; moon phase; predator avoidance; reproductive synchronization; moonlight  
  Abstract The way in which amphibians respond to the geophysical changes brought about by the lunar synodic cycle is a neglected area of their ecology, but one which has recently generated interest. Knowledge of how amphibians respond to lunar phase is of intrinsic interest and also may be important for conservation and monitoring of populations. We surveyed the literature on amphibians’ responses to the lunar cycle and found 79 examples where moon phase in relation to amphibian behavior and ecology had been studied, across diverse amphibian taxa. Of the examples reviewed, most of them show some type of response to lunar phase, with only a few species being unaffected. We found that there is no significant difference between the numbers of species which increase, and those that decrease activity or reproductive behavior (including calling) during a full moon. The responses to the lunar cycle can not be generalized across taxonomic group, but instead are highly species specific and relate directly to the species’ ecology. The primary reasons for changes in amphibian behavior in response to the lunar cycle appear to be temporal synchronization of breeding and predator avoidance. Responses to changes in prey availability, facilitation of visual signalling and use of lunar cues in navigation and homing are less prevalent but merit further investigation. Comparisons between studies are hampered by differences in field and analytical methods; we therefore make a number of recommendations for future collection and analysis of data related to lunar phase.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 81  
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