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Author Christie, S.; Vincent, A.D.; Li, H.; Frisby, C.L.; Kentish, S.J.; O'Rielly, R.; Wittert, G.A.; Page, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A rotating light cycle promotes weight gain and hepatic lipid storage in mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Processes involved in regulation of energy balance and intermediary metabolism are aligned to the light-dark cycle. Shift-work and high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity disrupt circadian rhythmicity and are associated with increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study aimed to determine the effect of simulating shift work on hepatic lipid accumulation in lean and HFD-mice. C57BL/6 mice fed a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or HFD for 4wks were further allocated to a normal light (NL)-cycle (lights on:0600-1800hr) or rotating light (RL)-cycle (3-days NL and 4-days reversed (lights on:1800-0600hr) repeated) for 8wks. Tissue was collected every 3hrs beginning at 0600hr. HFD-mice gained more weight than SLD-mice, and RL-mice gained more weight than NL-mice. SLD-NL and HFD-NL mice, but not RL-mice, were more active, had higher respiratory quotients and consumed/expended more energy during the dark phase compared to the light phase. Blood glucose and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were elevated in HFD and SLD-RL compared to SLD-NL mice. Hepatic glycogen was elevated in HFD compared to SLD-mice. Hepatic triglycerides were elevated in SLD-RL and HFD-mice compared to SLD-NL. Circadian rhythmicity of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA) mRNA was phase shifted in SLD-RL and HFD-NL and lost in HFD-RL mice. Hepatic ACACA protein was reduced in SLD-RL and HFD-mice compared to SLD-NL mice. Hepatic adipose triglyceride lipase was elevated in HFD-NL compared to SLD-NL but lower in RL-mice compared to NL-mice irrespective of diet. -Conclusion: A RL-cycle model of shift-work promotes weight gain and hepatic lipid storage even in lean conditions.  
  Address Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0193-1857 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30188750 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2123  
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Author Letu, H.; Hara, M.; Tana, G.; Nishio, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A Saturated Light Correction Method for DMSP/OLS Nighttime Satellite Imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sensing  
  Volume 50 Issue 2 Pages 389-396  
  Keywords DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; light at night; radiometry; calibration  
  Abstract Several studies have clarified that electric power consumption can be estimated from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) stable light imagery. As digital numbers (DNs) of stable light images are often saturated in the center of city areas, we developed a saturated light correction method for the DMSP/OLS stable light image using the nighttime radiance calibration image of the DMSP/OLS. The comparison between the nonsaturated part of the stable light image for 1999 and the radiance calibration image for 1996-1997 in major areas of Japan showed a strong linear correlation (R2 = 92.73) between the DNs of both images. Saturated DNs of the stable light image could therefore be corrected based on the correlation equation between the two images. To evaluate the new saturated light correction method, a regression analysis is performed between statistic data of electric power consumption from lighting and the cumulative DNs of the stable light image before and after correcting for the saturation effects by the new method, in comparison to the conventional method, which is, the cubic regression equation method. The results show a stronger improvement in the determination coefficient with the new saturated light correction method (R2 = 0.91, P = 1.7 ·10-6 <; 0.05) than with the conventional method (R2 = 0.81, P = 2.6 ·10-6 <; 0.05) from the initial correlation with the uncorrected data (R2 = 0.70, P = 4.5 · 10-6 <; 0.05). The new method proves therefore to be very efficient for saturated light correction.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0196-2892 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 204  
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Author Sutton, P.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A scale-adjusted measure of “Urban sprawl” using nighttime satellite imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 86 Issue 3 Pages 353-369  
  Keywords Urban sprawl; Sprawl Line; Nighttime satellite imagery; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; satellite; llight at night  
  Abstract “Urban Sprawl” is a growing concern of citizens, environmental organizations, and governments. Negative impacts often attributed to urban sprawl are traffic congestion, loss of open space, and increased pollutant runoff into natural waterways. Definitions of “Urban Sprawl” range from local patterns of land use and development to aggregate measures of per capita land consumption for given contiguous urban areas (UA). This research creates a measure of per capita land use consumption as an aggregate index for the spatially contiguous urban areas of the conterminous United States with population of 50,000 or greater. Nighttime satellite imagery obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP OLS) is used as a proxy measure of urban extent. The corresponding population of these urban areas is derived from a grid of the block group level data from the 1990 U.S. Census. These numbers are used to develop a regression equation between Ln(Urban Area) and Ln(Urban Population). The ‘scale-adjustment’ mentioned in the title characterizes the “Urban Sprawl” of each of the urban areas by how far above or below they are on the “Sprawl Line” determined by this regression. This “Sprawl Line” allows for a more fair comparison of “Urban Sprawl” between larger and smaller metropolitan areas because a simple measure of per capita land consumption or population density does not account for the natural increase in aggregate population density that occurs as cities grow in population. Cities that have more “Urban Sprawl” by this measure tended to be inland and Midwestern cities such as Minneapolis–St. Paul, Atlanta, Dallas–Ft. Worth, St. Louis, and Kansas City. Surprisingly, west coast cities including Los Angeles had some of the lowest levels of “Urban Sprawl” by this measure. There were many low light levels seen in the nighttime imagery around these major urban areas that were not included in either of the two definitions of urban extent used in this study. These areas may represent a growing commuter-shed of urban workers who do not live in the urban core but nonetheless contribute to many of the impacts typically attributed to “Urban Sprawl”. “Urban Sprawl” is difficult to define precisely partly because public perception of sprawl is likely derived from local land use planning decisions, spatio-demographic change in growing urban areas, and changing values and social mores resulting from differential rates of international migration to the urban areas of the United States. Nonetheless, the aggregate measures derived here are somewhat different than similar previously used measures in that they are ‘scale-adjusted’; also, the spatial patterns of “Urban Sprawl” shown here shed some insight and raise interesting questions about how the dynamics of “Urban Sprawl” are changing.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 233  
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Author Nordhaus, W.; Chen, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A sharper image? Estimates of the precision of nighttime lights as a proxy for economic statistics Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Economic Geography Abbreviated Journal J of Econ Geog  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 217-246  
  Keywords Nighttime lights; luminosity; output measurement; national accounts; proxy measures; social science; economics; remote sensing  
  Abstract Much aggregate social-science analysis relies upon the standard national income and product accounts as a source of economic data. These are recognized to be defective in many poor countries, and are missing at the regional level for large parts of the world. Using updated luminosity (or nighttime lights) data, the present study examines whether such data contain useful information for estimating national and regional incomes and output. The bootstrap method is used for estimating the statistical precision of the estimates of the contribution of the lights proxy. We conclude that there may be substantial cross-sectional information in lights data for countries with low-quality statistical systems. However, lights data provide very little additional information for countries with high-quality data wherever standard data are available. The largest statistical concerns arise from uncertainties about the precision of standard national accounts data.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford University Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 363  
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Author Cottam, C. openurl 
  Title (up) A shower of grebes Type Journal Article
  Year 1929 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 80-81  
  Keywords Animals; Birds  
  Abstract  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2424  
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