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Author Pena-Garcia, A.; Nguyen, T.P.L.
Title (up) A Global Perspective for Sustainable Highway Tunnel Lighting Regulations: Greater Road Safety with a Lower Environmental Impact Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health
Volume 15 Issue 12 Pages
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Tunnel lighting installations function 24 h a day, 365 days a year. These infrastructures have increased exponentially and now connect quite distant locations, even on different continents. This has led European administrations and international regulatory bodies to establish regulations for tunnel safety with the lowest environmental impact. However, until now, these regulations have almost exclusively focused on traffic safety, and relegated sustainability to the background. Even though they recognize the need to reduce energy consumption, they do not propose any tools for doing so. Given the impact of these installations and the lack of a specific regulatory framework, Asian countries will soon be forced either to update previous standards for tunnel lighting or elaborate new ones. A better understanding of the weaknesses of European regulations combined with a willingness to embrace innovation could position Asia as a world leader in the regulation of more sustainable road tunnels. The objective of this research was to improve the sustainability of tunnel lighting installations through new regulations or amendments to existing ones, without impairing the mental well-being of users, who could potentially be affected by energy-saving measures. Accordingly, this paper presents and analyzes a broad proposal for formulating tunnel lighting regulations. The originality of this proposal lies in the fact that it integrates road safety, lower environmental impact, and user well-being. Furthermore, it is expected to broaden the perspective of regulatory bodies and public administrations with regard to tunnel installations, which would ultimately enhance their sustainability.
Address Department of Development and Sustainability, School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, 12120 Pathumthani, Thailand. phuoclai@ait.asia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30486333 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2119
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Author Elvidge, C.D.; Sutton, P.C.; Ghosh, T.; Tuttle, B.T.; Baugh, K.E.; Bhaduri, B.; Bright, E.
Title (up) A global poverty map derived from satellite data Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Computers & Geosciences Abbreviated Journal Computers & Geosciences
Volume 35 Issue 8 Pages 1652-1660
Keywords Poverty; DMSP; Nighttime lights; World development indicators; light pollution
Abstract A global poverty map has been produced at 30 arcsec resolution using a poverty index calculated by dividing population count (LandScan 2004) by the brightness of satellite observed lighting (DMSP nighttime lights). Inputs to the LandScan product include satellite-derived land cover and topography, plus human settlement outlines derived from high-resolution imagery. The poverty estimates have been calibrated using national level poverty data from the World Development Indicators (WDI) 2006 edition. The total estimate of the numbers of individuals living in poverty is 2.2 billion, slightly under the WDI estimate of 2.6 billion. We have demonstrated a new class of poverty map that should improve over time through the inclusion of new reference data for calibration of poverty estimates and as improvements are made in the satellite observation of human activities related to economic activity and technology access.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0098-3004 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 123
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Author Walch, O.J.; Cochran, A.; Forger, D.B.
Title (up) A global quantification of “normal” sleep schedules using smartphone data Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Science Advances
Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages e1501705-e1501705
Keywords Human Health; Sleep; *Circadian Rhythm; smartphone; society
Abstract The influence of the circadian clock on sleep scheduling has been studied extensively in the laboratory; however, the effects of society on sleep remain largely unquantified. We show how a smartphone app that we have developed, ENTRAIN, accurately collects data on sleep habits around the world. Through mathematical modeling and statistics, we find that social pressures weaken and/or conceal biological drives in the evening, leading individuals to delay their bedtime and shorten their sleep. A country’s average bedtime, but not average wake time, predicts sleep duration. We further show that mathematical models based on controlled laboratory experiments predict qualitative trends in sunrise, sunset, and light level; however, these effects are attenuated in the real world around bedtime. Additionally, we find that women schedule more sleep than men and that users reporting that they are typically exposed to outdoor light go to sleep earlier and sleep more than those reporting indoor light. Finally, we find that age is the primary determinant of sleep timing, and that age plays an important role in the variability of population-level sleep habits. This work better defines and personalizes “normal” sleep, produces hypotheses for future testing in the laboratory, and suggests important ways to counteract the global sleep crisis.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1440
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Author Zhou, Y.; Li, X.; Asrar, G.R.; Smith, S.J.; Imhoff, M.
Title (up) A global record of annual urban dynamics (1992–2013) from nighttime lights Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 219 Issue Pages 206-220
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The nighttime light (NTL) observations from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescane System (DMSP/OLS) offer great potentials to study urban dynamics from regional to global scales, for more than two decades. In this paper, we presented a new approach to develop spatially and temporally consistent global urban maps from 1992 to 2013, using the DMSP/OLS NTL observations. First, potential urban clusters were delineated using the NTL data and a segmentation method. Then, a quantile-based approach was used to remove rural and suburban areas sequentially in the potential urban clusters. Finally, the derived series of urban extents in the entire study period (1992–2013) were improved for temporal consistency. We found the percentage of global urban areas relative to the world's land surface area increased from 0.23% in 1992 to 0.53% in 2013. Asia is the continent with the most significant urban growth, worldwide. The time series of global urban maps were evaluated for the spatial agreement and temporal consistency using a variety of widely used independent land-cover products. This evaluation indicates that the proposed approach is robust and performs well in deriving global urban dynamics across different spatial scales, i.e., cluster, province (or state), country, and region. Moreover, this quantile-based approach is advantageous, compared with other methods used in previous studies, because it does not require additional data for enhancement or calibration. The new time series of urban maps from this study offer a new dataset for studying global urbanization during the past decades and unique information to explore potential future trajectories of urban development, which appears to be distinct for different nations/regions, globally. Such information is pre-requisite for achieving the sustainable development goals, and associated targets, during ensuing decades.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2048
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Author Rodriguez, A.; Holmes, N.D.; Ryan, P.G.; Wilson, K.-J.; Faulquier, L.; Murillo, Y.; Raine, A.F.; Penniman, J.; Neves, V.; Rodriguez, B.; Negro, J.J.; Chiaradia, A.; Dann, P.; Anderson, T.; Metzger, B.; Shirai, M.; Deppe, L.; Wheeler, J.; Hodum, P.; Gouveia, C.; Carmo, V.; Carreira, G.P.; Delgado-Alburqueque, L.; Guerra-Correa, C.; Couzi, F.-X.; Travers, M.; Le Corre, M.
Title (up) A global review of seabird mortality caused by land-based artificial lights Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol
Volume 31 Issue 5 Pages 986-1001
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Artificial lights at night cause high mortality of seabirds, one of the most endangered groups of birds globally. Fledglings of burrow-nesting seabirds, and to a lesser extent adults, are grounded by lights when they fly at night. We review the current state of knowledge of light attraction, identify information gaps and propose measures to address the problem. Although other avian families such as Alcidae and Anatidae can be involved, the most affected seabirds are petrels and shearwaters: at least 56 species, more than one-third of them (24) threatened, are grounded by lights. Grounded seabirds have been found worldwide, mainly on oceanic islands but also at some continental locations. Petrel breeding grounds confined to formerly uninhabited islands are particularly at risk from ever-growing levels of light pollution due to tourism and urban sprawl. Where it is impractical to ban external lights, rescue programs of grounded birds offer the most immediate and extended mitigation measures to reduce light-induced mortality, saving thousands of birds every year. These programs also provide useful information for seabird management. However, the data typically are fragmentary and often strongly biased so the phenomenon is poorly understood, leading to inaccurate impact estimates. We identified as the most urgent priority actions: 1) estimation of mortality and impact on populations; 2) assessment of threshold light levels and safe distances from light sources; 3) documenting the fate of rescued birds; 4) improvement of rescue campaigns, particularly in terms of increasing recovery rates and level of care; and 5) research on seabird-friendly lights to reduce attraction. More research is necessary to improve our understanding of this human-wildlife conflict and to design effective management and mitigation measures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address UMR ENTROPIE, Universite de la Reunion 15, avenue Rene Cassin – CS 92003 97744 Saint Denis Cedex 9, La Reunion, France
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28151557 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1632
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