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Author Merckx, T.; Van Dyck, H.; Isaac, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urbanization‐driven homogenization is more pronounced and happens at wider spatial scales in nocturnal and mobile flying insects Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Abbreviated Journal Global Ecol Biogeogr  
  Volume 28 Issue 10 Pages 1440-1455  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals  
  Abstract Aim

We test whether urbanization drives biotic homogenization. We hypothesize that declines in abundance and species diversity of aerial insects are exacerbated by the urbanization‐driven loss of species with low habitat generalism, mobility and warm‐adaptedness. We predict this homogenization to be more pronounced for nocturnal taxa, and at wider scales for mobile taxa.

Location

Belgium.

Time period

Summers 2014–2015.

Major taxa studied

Lepidoptera.

Methods

We compare communities along urbanization gradients using a shared, replicated and nested sampling design, in which butterflies were counted within 81 grassland and macro‐moths light‐trapped in 12 woodland sites. We quantify taxonomic and functional community composition, the latter via community‐weighted means and variation of species‐specific traits related to specialization, mobility and thermophily. Using linear regression models, variables are analysed in relation to site‐specific urbanization values quantified at seven scales (50–3,200 m radii). At best‐fitting scales, we test for taxonomic homogenization.

Results

With increasing urbanization, abundance, species richness and Shannon diversity severely declined, with butterfly and macro‐moth declines due to local‐ versus landscape‐scale urbanization (200 vs. 800–3,200 m radii, respectively). While taxonomic homogenization was absent for butterflies, urban macro‐moth communities displayed higher nestedness than non‐urban communities. Overall, communities showed mean shifts towards generalist, mobile and thermophilous species, displaying trait convergence too. These functional trait models consistently fit best with urbanization quantified at local scales (100–200 m radii) for butterfly communities, and at local to wider landscape scales (200–800 m radii) for macro‐moth communities.

Main conclusions

Urban communities display functional homogenization that follows urbanization at scales linked to taxon‐specific mobility. Light pollution may explain why homogenization was more pronounced for the nocturnal taxon. We discuss that urbanization is likely to impact flying insect communities across the globe, but also that impacts on their ecosystem functions and services could be mitigated via multi‐scale implementation of urban green infrastructure.
 
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  ISSN 1466-822X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2588  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tan, M.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Why do nocturnal grasshoppers and katydids “salute” to flash photography? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Entomological Science Abbreviated Journal Entomological Science  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 216-219  
  Keywords Animals; Insects; grasshoppers; katydids; orthoptera  
  Abstract Nocturnal animals can be sensitive to powerful light from the environment. Anthropogenically induced perturbation to natural light regimes, including ecological light pollution and flash photography, can have wide‐reaching implications on the ecology and behavior. Ecological ramifications of strong lights were traditionally focused on vertebrates although there is now more focus on invertebrates. Nonetheless, there are still unanswered questions on visual ecology and evolution, particularly on individual‐level effects and of tropical species. Specifically, how invertebrate individuals react to strong light is generally undocumented. Based on opportunistic surveys around Southeast Asia, orthopterans, spotted using concentrated torchlight and exposed to sudden strong light intensity during flash macrophotography, were observed to screen themselves by positioning their foreleg over the dorsum of the compound eye. This resembled the orthopteran “saluting” to the camera. These observations provided empirical evidence of how high intensity light can unsettle orthopterans and other insects and further ecological and evolutionary hypotheses and questions can be raised to understand the effect of light pollution.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1343-8786 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2324  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Desouhant, E.; Gomes, E.; Mondy, N.; Amat, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mechanistic, ecological, and evolutionary consequences of artificial light at night for insects: review and prospective Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata Abbreviated Journal Entomol Exp Appl  
  Volume 167 Issue 1 Pages 37-58  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The alternation of light and dark periods on a daily or seasonal time scale is of utmost importance for the synchronization of physiological and behavioral processes in the environment. For the last 2 decades, artificial light at night (ALAN) has strongly increased worldwide, disrupting the photoperiod and its related physiological processes, and impacting the survival and reproduction of wild animals. ALAN is now considered as a major concern for biodiversity and human health. Here, we present why insects are relevant biological models to investigate the impact of ALAN. First the phenotypic responses to ALAN and their underpinning mechanisms are reviewed. The consequences for population dynamics, and the community composition and functioning are described in the second part. Because ALAN provides new and widespread selective pressure, we inventory evolutionary changes in response to this anthropogenic change. Finally, we identify promising future avenues, focusing on the necessity of understanding evolutionary processes that could help stakeholders consider darkness as a resource to preserve biodiversity as well as numerous ecosystem services in which insects are involved.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-8703 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2195  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hüppop, O.; Ciach, M.; Diehl, R.; Reynolds, D.R.; Stepanian, P.M.; Menz, M.H.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Perspectives and challenges for the use of radar in biological conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ecography Abbreviated Journal Ecography  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Review  
  Abstract Radar is at the forefront for the study of broad‐scale aerial movements of birds, bats and insects and related issues in biological conservation. Radar techniques are especially useful for investigating species which fly at high altitudes, in darkness, or which are too small for applying electronic tags. Here, we present an overview of radar applications in biological conservation and highlight its future possibilities. Depending on the type of radar, information can be gathered on local‐ to continental‐scale movements of airborne organisms and their behaviour. Such data can quantify flyway usage, biomass and nutrient transport (bioflow), population sizes, dynamics and distributions, times and dimensions of movements, areas and times of mass emergence and swarming, habitat use and activity ranges. Radar also captures behavioural responses to anthropogenic disturbances, artificial light and man‐made structures. Weather surveillance and other long‐range radar networks allow spatially broad overviews of important stopover areas, songbird mass roosts and emergences from bat caves. Mobile radars, including repurposed marine radars and commercially dedicated ‘bird radars’, offer the ability to track and monitor the local movements of individuals or groups of flying animals. Harmonic radar techniques have been used for tracking short‐range movements of insects and other small animals of conservation interest. However, a major challenge in aeroecology is determining the taxonomic identity of the targets, which often requires ancillary data obtained from other methods. Radar data have become a global source of information on ecosystem structure, composition, services and function and will play an increasing role in the monitoring and conservation of flying animals and threatened habitats worldwide.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2204  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Edensor, T.; Andrews, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Walking the creek: reconnecting place through light projection Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Geographical Research Abbreviated Journal Geographical Research  
  Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 263-274  
  Keywords Society; Psychology; Australia; public amenity; placemaking; light projection  
  Abstract In this paper, we explore how a light projection sought to convey a range of qualities: conviviality, a sense of place, playfulness, defamiliarisation, and the affective and sensory capacities that were experienced through walking in the distinctive, liminal realm of Bendigo Creek in Victoria, Australia. The projection aspired to solicit a sensory and affective empathy that chimed with the experiences of an earlier event in which dozens of pedestrians were filmed walking in the creek. The projection contributed to a local campaign to reappraise the much‐maligned creek as a local public amenity. We discuss the productive potential of solitary and collective walking and, subsequently, the attributes of the projection in its static and mobile manifestation. In so doing, we suggest that publicly engaged, inclusive, creative practice can offer potent place‐making possibilities.  
  Address School of Geography, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria, Australia; t.edensor(at)mmu.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1745-5863 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2435  
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