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Author Li, J.; Xu, Y.; Cui, W.; Ji, M.; Su, B.; Wu, Y.; Wang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Investigation of Nighttime Light Pollution in Nanjing, China by Mapping Illuminance from Field Observations and Luojia 1-01 Imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 681  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In recent years, the number of artificial light sources has tremendously increased with the development of lighting technology and the economy. Nighttime light pollution has been an increasing environmental problem, resulting in negative impacts on human health and the ecological environment. Detailed knowledge of light pollution is important for the planning and management of urban lighting. In this study, light pollution in Nanjing, China was monitored and analyzed using field observations and a 130-m resolution Luojia 1-01 nighttime light imagery. Combined with in situ observations and satellite imagery, a variety of empirical models were established for estimating ambient illuminance at night. Cross-validation was employed to assess the performance of these models, indicating that the third-degree polynomials model had the best performance (MAE = 5.06 lx, R2 = 0.81). The developed third-degree polynomial model was then applied to the Luojia 1-01 image to map the nighttime illuminance in Nanjing. The nighttime illuminance depicted the spatial pattern of the light environment over Nanjing and also indicated some heavily light-polluted areas. Some lit areas were residential areas, whose high brightness had negative effects on residents and need particular attention. This study provides a quantitative and objective reference for the light pollution management in Nanjing, and also a reference for light pollution survey in other regions.  
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  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2823  
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Author Schulte-Römer, N.; Meier, J.; Dannemann, E.; Söding, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting Professionals versus Light Pollution Experts? Investigating Views on an Emerging Environmental Concern Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 11 Issue 6 Pages 1696  
  Keywords Lighting; Society  
  Abstract Concerns about the potential negative effects of artificial light at night on humans, flora and fauna, were originally raised by astronomers and environmentalists. Yet, we observe a growing interest in what is called light pollution among the general public and in the lighting field. Although lighting professionals are often critical of calling light ‘pollution’, they increasingly acknowledge the problem and are beginning to act accordingly. Are those who illuminate joining forces with those who take a critical stance towards artificial light at night? We explore this question in more detail based on the results of a non-representative worldwide expert survey. In our analysis, we distinguish between “lighting professionals” with occupational backgrounds linked to lighting design and the lighting industry, and “light pollution experts” with mostly astronomy- and environment-related professional backgrounds, and explore their opposing and shared views vis-à-vis issues of light pollution. Our analysis reveals that despite seemingly conflicting interests, lighting professionals and light pollution experts largely agree on the problem definition and problem-solving approaches. However, we see diverging views regarding potential obstacles to light pollution mitigation and associated governance challenges.  
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  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2278  
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Author Grubisic, M.; Haim, A.; Bhusal, P.; Dominoni, D.M.; Gabriel, K.M.A.; Jechow, A.; Kupprat, F.; Lerner, A.; Marchant, P.; Riley, W.; Stebelova, K.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Zeman, M.; Zubidat, A.E.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Pollution, Circadian Photoreception, and Melatonin in Vertebrates Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 11 Issue 22 Pages 6400  
  Keywords Animals; Review  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is increasing exponentially worldwide, accelerated by the transition to new efficient lighting technologies. However, ALAN and resulting light pollution can cause unintended physiological consequences. In vertebrates, production of melatonin—the “hormone of darkness” and a key player in circadian regulation—can be suppressed by ALAN. In this paper, we provide an overview of research on melatonin and ALAN in vertebrates. We discuss how ALAN disrupts natural photic environments, its effect on melatonin and circadian rhythms, and different photoreceptor systems across vertebrate taxa. We then present the results of a systematic review in which we identified studies on melatonin under typical light-polluted conditions in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, including humans. Melatonin is suppressed by extremely low light intensities in many vertebrates, ranging from 0.01–0.03 lx for fishes and rodents to 6 lx for sensitive humans. Even lower, wavelength-dependent intensities are implied by some studies and require rigorous testing in ecological contexts. In many studies, melatonin suppression occurs at the minimum light levels tested, and, in better-studied groups, melatonin suppression is reported to occur at lower light levels. We identify major research gaps and conclude that, for most groups, crucial information is lacking. No studies were identified for amphibians and reptiles and long-term impacts of low-level ALAN exposure are unknown. Given the high sensitivity of vertebrate melatonin production to ALAN and the paucity of available information, it is crucial to research impacts of ALAN further in order to inform effective mitigation strategies for human health and the wellbeing and fitness of vertebrates in natural ecosystems.  
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  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2733  
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Author Schulte-Römer, N.; Meier, J.; Söding, M.; Dannemann, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The LED Paradox: How Light Pollution Challenges Experts to Reconsider Sustainable Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 11 Issue 21 Pages 6160  
  Keywords Energy; Lighting; Society  
  Abstract In the 21st century, the notion of “sustainable lighting” is closely associated with LED technology. In the past ten years, municipalities and private light users worldwide have installed light-emitting diodes in urban spaces and public streets to save energy. Yet an increasing body of interdisciplinary research suggests that supposedly sustainable LED installations are in fact unsustainable, because they increase light pollution. Paradoxically, blue-rich cool-white LED lighting, which is the most energy-efficient, also appears to be the most ecologically unfriendly. Biologists, physicians and ecologists warn that blue-rich LED light disturbs the circadian day-and-night rhythm of living organisms, including humans, with potential negative health effects on individual species and whole ecosystems. Can the paradox be solved? This paper explores this question based on our transdisciplinary research project Light Pollution—A Global Discussion. It reveals how light pollution experts and lighting professionals see the challenges and potential of LED lighting from their different viewpoints. This expert feedback shows that “sustainable LED lighting” goes far beyond energy efficiency as it raises complex design issues that imply stakeholder negotiation. It also suggests that the LED paradox may be solved in context, but hardly in principle.  
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  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2824  
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Author Guanglei, W.; Ngarambe, J.; Kim, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Comparative Study on Current Outdoor Lighting Policies in China and Korea: A Step toward a Sustainable Nighttime Environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 11 Issue 14 Pages 3989  
  Keywords Lighting; Policy  
  Abstract Light pollution is a serious environmental issue with many adverse effects on human health and the ecosystem as a whole. Accordingly, many countries have issued laws and regulations to limit the effects of artificial lighting at night (ALAN). The Republic of Korea and China are among the few countries that have drafted laws to curb light pollution. In the present study, we gathered data related to light pollution regulations and ordinances in both China and Korea. We then carried out a comparative analysis of the light pollution laws of both countries. We found that, although the two countries share a similar socio-economic background, they have different approaches to the issue of light pollution. The information provided in this study serves as a guideline to countries that wish to develop their own light pollution policies. In addition, the conclusions provided in our study offer potential improvements to local and national light pollution policies in both the Republic of Korea and China.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2602  
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