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Author Hölker, F.; Wurzbacher, C.; Weißenborn, C.; Monaghan, M.T.; Holzhauer, S.I.J.; Premke, K.
Title Microbial diversity and community respiration in freshwater sediments influenced by artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume (down) 370 Issue Pages 20140130
Keywords Animals; DNA metabarcoding; next-generation sequencing; light pollution; photoautotrophs; diatoms; Cyanobacteria; primary production; carbon turnover; freshwater
Abstract An increasing proportion of the Earth's surface is illuminated at night. In aquatic ecosystems, artificial light at night (ALAN) may influence microbial communities living in the sediments. These communities are highly diverse and play an important role in the global carbon cycle. We combined field and laboratory experiments using sediments from an agricultural drainage system to examine how ALAN affects communities and alters carbon mineralization. Two identical light infrastructures were installed parallel to a drainage ditch before the start of the experiment. DNA metabarcoding indicated that both sediment communities were similar. After one was lit for five months (July–December 2012) we observed an increase in abundance (diatoms, Cyanobacteria) in ALAN-exposed sediments. In laboratory incubations mimicking summer and winter (six weeks each), communities in sediments that were exposed to ALAN for 1 year (July 2012–June 2013) showed less overall seasonal change compared with ALAN-naive sediments. Nocturnal community respiration was reduced in ALAN-exposed sediments. In long-term exposed summer-sediments, we observed a shift from negative to positive net ecosystem production. Our results indicate ALAN may alter sediment microbial communities over time, with implications for ecosystem-level functions. It may thus have the potential to transform inland waters to nocturnal carbon sinks.
Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Mu¨ggelseedamm 301/310, Berlin 12587, Germany; hoelker@igb-berlin.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1127
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Author Landgren, E.; Fritsches, K.; Brill, R.; Warrant, E.
Title The visual ecology of a deep-sea fish, the escolar Lepidocybium flavobrunneum (Smith, 1843) Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume (down) 369 Issue 1636 Pages 20130039
Keywords Vision; Animals
Abstract Escolar (Lepidocybium flavobrunneum, family Gempylidae) are large and darkly coloured deep-sea predatory fish found in the cold depths (more than 200 m) during the day and in warm surface waters at night. They have large eyes and an overall low density of retinal ganglion cells that endow them with a very high optical sensitivity. Escolar have banked retinae comprising six to eight layers of rods to increase the optical path length for maximal absorption of the incoming light. Their retinae possess two main areae of higher ganglion cell density, one in the ventral retina viewing the dorsal world above (with a moderate acuity of 4.6 cycles deg(-1)), and the second in the temporal retina viewing the frontal world ahead. Electrophysiological recordings of the flicker fusion frequency (FFF) in isolated retinas indicate that escolar have slow vision, with maximal FFF at the highest light levels and temperatures (around 9 Hz at 23 degrees C) which fall to 1-2 Hz in dim light or cooler temperatures. Our results suggest that escolar are slowly moving sit-and-wait predators. In dim, warm surface waters at night, their slow vision, moderate dorsal resolution and highly sensitive eyes may allow them to surprise prey from below that are silhouetted in the downwelling light.
Address Lund Vision Group, Department of Biology, University of Lund, , Solvegatan 35, 22362 Lund, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8436 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24395966; PMCID:PMC3886327 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1092
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Author Dacke, M.; Byrne, M.J.; Baird, E.; Scholtz, C.H.; Warrant, E.J.
Title How dim is dim? Precision of the celestial compass in moonlight and sunlight Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume (down) 366 Issue 1565 Pages 697-702
Keywords Animals; Beetles/*physiology; Behavior, Animal; *Moon; *Sunlight; Video Recording
Abstract Prominent in the sky, but not visible to humans, is a pattern of polarized skylight formed around both the Sun and the Moon. Dung beetles are, at present, the only animal group known to use the much dimmer polarization pattern formed around the Moon as a compass cue for maintaining travel direction. However, the Moon is not visible every night and the intensity of the celestial polarization pattern gradually declines as the Moon wanes. Therefore, for nocturnal orientation on all moonlit nights, the absolute sensitivity of the dung beetle's polarization detector may limit the precision of this behaviour. To test this, we studied the straight-line foraging behaviour of the nocturnal ball-rolling dung beetle Scarabaeus satyrus to establish when the Moon is too dim--and the polarization pattern too weak--to provide a reliable cue for orientation. Our results show that celestial orientation is as accurate during crescent Moon as it is during full Moon. Moreover, this orientation accuracy is equal to that measured for diurnal species that orient under the 100 million times brighter polarization pattern formed around the Sun. This indicates that, in nocturnal species, the sensitivity of the optical polarization compass can be greatly increased without any loss of precision.
Address Department of Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 223 62 Lund, Sweden. marie.dacke@cob.lu.se
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8436 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21282173; PMCID:PMC3049003 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 34
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Author Xavier Kerola, D.
Title Modelling artificial night-sky brightness with a polarized multiple scattering radiative transfer computer code: Modelling artificial night-sky brightness Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 365 Issue 4 Pages 1295-1299
Keywords Skyglow; modeling; radiative transfer; Gauss-Seidel; light pollution; Garstang model
Abstract As part of an ongoing investigation of radiative effects produced by hazy atmospheres, computational procedures have been developed for use in determining the brightening of the night sky as a result of urban illumination. The downwardly and upwardly directed radiances of multiply scattered light from an offending metropolitan source are computed by a straightforward Gauss-Seidel (G-S) iterative technique applied directly to the integrated form of Chandrasekhar's vectorized radiative transfer equation. Initial benchmark night-sky brightness tests of the present G-S model using fully consistent optical emission and extinction input parameters yield very encouraging results when compared with the double scattering treatment of Garstang, the only full-fledged previously available model.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 278
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Author Datta, S.; Samanta, D.; Tiwary, B.; Chaudhuri, A.G.; Chakrabarti, N.
Title Sex and estrous cycle dependent changes in locomotor activity, anxiety and memory performance in aged mice after exposure of light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res
Volume (down) 365 Issue Pages 198-209
Keywords Animals; mouse models; locomotor activities
Abstract Light-at-night (LAN) can affect mammalian behaviour. But, the effects of LAN on aged rodents remain undefined yet. In the present investigation, aged Swiss Albino mice, habituated in regular light-dark cycle, were exposed to bright-light-pulse (1-hr) at night on the day of study followed by experimentations for assessment of locomotor activities in the open field, anxiety in the elevated plus maze and short-term memory for novel object recognition (NOR) in the habituated field. Under without-bright-light exposure, (a) aged proestrous females showed greater locomotor activities and less anxiety than in aged diestrous females, (b) aged males showed locomotor activities and anxiety level similar to aged diestrous females and aged proestrous females respectively and (c) all animals failed to retain in object discrimination memory. LAN exposure exhibited the continual failure of such retention of memory while animals showed free and spontaneous exploration with thigmotactic behaviour having no object bias and/or phobia, but time stay in objects by animals altered variably among sexes and stages of estrous cycle. Overall, the LAN caused (a) diminution in locomotor activities, rise in anxiety and failure of memory for recognition of both familiar and novel objects in aged proestrous females, (b) hyperlocomotor activities and reduction in anxiety in both males and diestrous females with the failure of memory for recognition of novel objects only in aged males while diestrous females showed enhanced exploration time to both objects during NOR. Thus, nocturnal behaviour of aged mice varies with sex and estrous cycle and light acts differentially on them.
Address University of Calcutta, Department of Physiology, 92, APC Road, Kolkata, 700009, West Bengal, India. Electronic address: ncphysiolcu@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30853396 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2259
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