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Author Kolkert, H.; Smith, R.; Rader, R.; Reid, N.
Title Insectivorous bats foraging in cotton crop interiors is driven by moon illumination and insect abundance, but diversity benefits from woody vegetation cover Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment Abbreviated Journal Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Volume (down) 302 Issue Pages 107068
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract Landscape and biophysical determinants of insectivorous bat activity and community composition in space and time are central to understanding how growers can maximise bat-mediated pest control services in crops. We measured community composition, abundance, richness and foraging attempts of insectivorous bats in the centre of dryland cotton crops using acoustic sampling. We examined how bat activity was related to woody vegetation in the surrounding landscape, prey insect abundance, distance to crop edge, size of field, proximity to waterbodies and moon illumination to better understand insectivorous bat diversity and foraging in crop interiors. We collected a total of 9467 acoustic files including 1198 foraging attempts (feeding buzzes) of at least 21 insectivorous bat species. The bat assemblage in cotton crop interiors (richness and diversity) was positively related to woody vegetation foliage cover within 5–10 km of the crop, as well as Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera abundance, but was negatively related to distance from the field edge into the crop and moon illumination. Increased feeding attempts were linked to increased Lepidoptera and Hemiptera on nights of high moon illumination (> 75 %). Bat activity and foraging was also higher during nights of increased insect abundance, particularly Lepidoptera, indicating that bats track food resources. Our results highlight the importance of managing bat roosting habitat at different landscape scales to enhance bat diversity and foraging in crop interiors and thus insect consumption. Given the high bat feeding activity on nights of high moon illumination and increased Hemiptera abundance, the timing of insecticide sprays to target pests, such as Hemipteran sucking bugs, could be scheduled on nights of low moon illumination. Such information is useful in identifying conservation priorities for the management of bats in intensively farmed agroecosystems and should facilitate habitat management by growers to maximise crop pest protection services in crop interiors.
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ISSN 0167-8809 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3045
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Author Froy, O.; Gotter, A.L.; Casselman, A.L.; Reppert, S.M.
Title Illuminating the circadian clock in monarch butterfly migration Type Journal Article
Year 2003 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume (down) 300 Issue 5623 Pages 1303-1305
Keywords Animals; *Animal Migration; Biological Clocks/*physiology; Butterflies/genetics/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cloning, Molecular; Darkness; Flight, Animal; Light; Nuclear Proteins/genetics/physiology; Period Circadian Proteins; Solar System; Ultraviolet Rays; butterflies; monarch
Abstract Migratory monarch butterflies use a time-compensated Sun compass to navigate to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. Here, we report that constant light, which disrupts circadian clock function at both the behavioral and molecular levels in monarchs, also disrupts the time-compensated component of flight navigation. We further show that ultraviolet light is important for flight navigation but is not required for photic entrainment of circadian rhythms. Tracing these distinct light-input pathways into the brain should aid our understanding of the clock-compass mechanisms necessary for successful migration.
Address Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, LRB-728, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:12764200 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1072
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Author Burne, B.H.
Title Pollution By Light Type Journal Article
Year 1972 Publication The Lancet Abbreviated Journal The Lancet
Volume (down) 299 Issue 7751 Pages 642
Keywords Commentary, Human Health
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ISSN 0140-6736 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1191
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Author Traill, L.W.; Martin, J.; Owen-Smith, N.
Title Lion proximity, not moon phase, affects the nocturnal movement behaviour of zebra and wildebeest Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal J Zool
Volume (down) 299 Issue 3 Pages 221-227
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract Moon phase affects nocturnal activity patterns in mammals. Among ungulates, a number of studies have found animals to be more active over full moon nights. This may be because increased luminosity provides increased opportunity to forage and/or increased ability to detect predators; known as the visual acuity hypothesis. Here, we use GPS-derived movement data to test for the influence of moon phase on plains zebra Equus quagga and blue wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus activity in Kruger National Park, South Africa. We compare animal movement (rate and displacement) over full and new moon nights, and consider the effect of lion proximity. We found that lion proximity largely determined the nocturnal movements of zebra and wildebeest, not moon phase. When lions were >1 km away, there was no difference in the nocturnal movement activity of prey animals over full and new moon conditions, contradicting previous findings. When lions were within 1 km of these animals, however, the movement of zebra and wildebeest greatly increased over the new moon, the relatively dark period when lion were most likely hunting. Although we could not explicitly test for predator detection here, our findings suggest that the visual acuity hypothesis does not hold for zebra and wildebeest in Kruger National Park (KNP) given that there is no evidence for increased foraging activity over the full moon. The influence of moon phase on the nocturnal activity of African ungulates may be more complicated than anticipated, and we suggest that this cannot be estimated unless predator proximity is accounted for.
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ISSN 0952-8369 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1558
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Author Jafarey, N.A.; Khan, M.Y.; Jafarey, S.N.
Title Role Of Artificial Lighting In Decreasing The Age Of Menarche Type Journal Article
Year 1970 Publication The Lancet Abbreviated Journal The Lancet
Volume (down) 296 Issue 7670 Pages 471
Keywords commentary; human health
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0140-6736 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1192
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