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Author Skibba, R. A.; Bamford, S. P.; Nichol, R. C.; Lintott, C. J.; Andreescu, D.; Edmondson, E. M.; et al. openurl 
  Title Skibba, R. A., Bamford, S. P., Nichol, R. C., Lintott, C. J., Andreescu, D., Edmondson, E. M., … others. (2009). Galaxy Zoo: disentangling the environmental dependence of morphology and colour. Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 399 Issue 2 Pages 966–982  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 971  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quinn, G.E.; Shin, C.H.; Maguire, M.G.; Stone, R.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Myopia and ambient lighting at night Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume (down) 399 Issue 6732 Pages 113-114  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Myopia, or short-sightedness, occurs when the image of distant objects, focused by the cornea and lens, falls in front of the retina. It commonly arises from excessive postnatal eye growth, particularly in the vitreous cavity. Its prevalence is increasing and now reaches 70-90% in some Asian populations1,2. As well as requiring optical correction, myopia is a leading risk factor for acquired blindness in adults because it predisposes individuals to retinal detachment, retinal degeneration and glaucoma. It typically develops in the early school years but can manifest into early adulthood2. Its aetiology is poorly understood but may involve genetic and environmental factors1,2, such as viewing close objects, although how this stimulates eye growth is not known3. We have looked at the effects of light exposure on vision, and find a strong association between myopia and night-time ambient light exposure during sleep in children before they reach two years of age.  
  Address  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:10335839 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2550  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, X.; Liu, G.; Coscieme, L.; Giannetti, B.F.; Hao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, M.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Study on the emergy-based thermodynamic geography of the Jing-Jin-Ji region: Combined multivariate statistical data with DMSP-OLS nighttime lights data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecological Modelling Abbreviated Journal Ecological Modelling  
  Volume (down) 397 Issue Pages 1-15  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Emergy analysis is one of the ecological thermodynamics methods. With a specific set of indicators, it is proved to be highly informative for sustainability assessment of national/regional economies. However, a large amount of data needed for its calculation are from official statistical data by administrative divisions. The spatialization of emergy in early researches were limited to the administrative boundaries. The emergy inside an administrative boundary renders a single value, which hides plenty of information for more precise regional planning.

This study develops a new methodology for mapping the spatial distribution of emergy density of a region. The renewable resource distribution can be mapped based on latest geospatial datasets and GIS technology, instead of solely relying on statistics and yearbooks data. Besides, a new spatialization method of non-renewable emergy based on DMSP-OLS nighttime lights data is proposed. Combined with the radiation calibration data, the problem of light saturation of DMSP-OLS nighttime lights data was solved to improve the emergy spatial detail of city centers. With a case study of Jing-Jin-Ji region, results showed that this method could generate a high-resolution map of emergy use, and depict human disturbance to the environment in a more precise manner. This may provide supportive information for more precise land use planning, strategic layout and policy regulation, and is helpful for regional sustainable development.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2192  
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Author Bamford, S.P.; Nichol, R.C.; Baldry, I.K.; Land, K.; Lintott, C.J.; Schawinski, K.; Slosar, A.; Szalay, A.S.; Thomas, D.; Torki, M.; Andreescu, D.; Edmondson, E.M.; Miller, C.J.; Murray, P.; Raddick, M.J.; Vandenberg, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of morphology and colour on environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 393 Issue 4 Pages 1324-1352  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 902  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boivin, D.B.; Duffy, J.F.; Kronauer, R.E.; Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dose-response relationships for resetting of human circadian clock by light Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume (down) 379 Issue 6565 Pages 540-542  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Body Temperature; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Humans; *Light; Male; NASA Discipline Number 18-10; NASA Discipline Regulatory Physiology; NASA Program Space Physiology and Countermeasures; Non-NASA Center  
  Abstract Since the first report in unicells, studies across diverse species have demonstrated that light is a powerful synchronizer which resets, in an intensity-dependent manner, endogenous circadian pacemakers. Although it is recognized that bright light (approximately 7,000 to 13,000 lux) is an effective circadian synchronizer in humans, it is widely believed that the human circadian pacemaker is insensitive to ordinary indoor illumination (approximately 50-300 lux). It has been proposed that the relationship between the resetting effect of light and its intensity follows a compressive nonlinear function, such that exposure to lower illuminances still exerts a robust effect. We therefore undertook a series of experiments which support this hypothesis and report here that light of even relatively low intensity (approximately 180 lux) significantly phase-shifts the human circadian pacemaker. Our results clearly demonstrate that humans are much more sensitive to light than initially suspected and support the conclusion that they are not qualitatively different from other mammals in their mechanism of circadian entrainment.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:8596632 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 722  
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