toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Kumar, J.; Malik, S.; Bhardwaj, S.K.; Rani, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright light at night alters the perception of daylength in Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume (down) 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 488-496  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The brighter nights have posed new challenges to the wild species by affecting their temporal physiology. The present study on Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) investigated if exposure to bright light at different phases of night affects their clock-mediated daily functions. Birds were placed individually in specially designed activity cages under short days and long nights (8L:16D; L = 100 lux, D < 0.1 lux) for approximately 3 weeks (19 days). Thereafter, they were divided into four groups (n = 6-9), and given approximately 2 lux light either for the entire night (ZT 08-24; zeitgeber time 0 = time of light on; pattern A) or for 4 hr (pattern B), placed in 16 hr night such that its onset coincides with the onset of night (early night group, ZT 08-12), its end with the end of night (late night group, ZT 20-24), or the night was interrupted in the middle (midnight group, ZT 14-18). The results showed that bright light in entire night induced early onset of day activity and fragmented rest at night, however, if given at different phases of night, it made the days longer by delaying end (early night group) or advancing onset of daily activity (late night group). It also suppressed the melatonin levels and increased body temperature. These results suggest that bright light at night alters the perception of daylength and affects the underlying physiology. The findings may be useful in adopting a strategy for use of night light without disturbing species fitness in their environment.  
  Address Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30043408 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1971  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Middleton, B.; Stone, B.M.; Arendt, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human circadian phase in 12:12 h, 200:<8 lux and 1000:<8 lux light-dark cycles, without scheduled sleep or activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience Letters  
  Volume (down) 329 Issue 1 Pages 41-44  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The light levels required to maintain human circadian phase in the absence of other strong time cues are not defined. We investigated circadian phase in two groups of men, living in partial temporal isolation, exposed to 12 h:12 h light:dark cycles of: (A) 200:<8 lux, broad spectrum white light for 14 days; and (B) 1000:<8lux for 14 days. The rhythm variables measured were urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin, rectal temperature, activity and rest (actigraphy and sleep logs). In 200:<8 lux four/six individuals showed phase delays. Exposure to 1000:<8 lux appeared to maintain synchronisation of rest-activity to 24 h, but with a significant overall phase advance of 0.81 h in temperature. These observations suggest that domestic intensity light does not maintain phase without scheduled sleep/activity, possibly due to indirect effects on behaviour influencing light exposure.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3940 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2247  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.; Elvidge, C.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The first World Atlas of the artificial night sky brightness Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume (down) 328 Issue 3 Pages 689-707  
  Keywords scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; site testing; DMSP  
  Abstract We present the first World Atlas of the zenith artificial night sky brightness at sea level. Based on radiance-calibrated high-resolution DMSP satellite data and on accurate modelling of light propagation in the atmosphere, it provides a nearly global picture of how mankind is proceeding to envelop itself in a luminous fog. Comparing the Atlas with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) population density data base, we determined the fraction of population who are living under a sky of given brightness. About two-thirds of the World population and 99 per cent of the population in the United States (excluding Alaska and Hawaii) and European Union live in areas where the night sky is above the threshold set for polluted status. Assuming average eye functionality, about one-fifth of the World population, more than two-thirds of the United States population and more than one half of the European Union population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way. Finally, about one-tenth of the World population, more than 40 per cent of the United States population and one sixth of the European Union population no longer view the heavens with the eye adapted to night vision, because of the sky brightness.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 173  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.; Elvidge, C.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Naked-eye star visibility and limiting magnitude mapped from DMSP-OLS satellite data Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society  
  Volume (down) 323 Issue 1 Pages 34-46  
  Keywords light at night; remote sensing; GTOPO30; DMSP; light pollution; modeling; mapping  
  Abstract We extend the method introduced by Cinzano et al. (2000a) to map the artificial sky brightness in large territories from DMSP satellite data, in order to map the naked eye star visibility and telescopic limiting magnitudes. For these purposes we take into account the altitude of each land area from GTOPO30 world elevation data, the natural sky brightness in the chosen sky direction, based on Garstang modelling, the eye capability with naked eye or a telescope, based on the Schaefer (1990) and Garstang (2000b) approach, and the stellar extinction in the visual photometric band. For near zenith sky directions we also take into account screening by terrain elevation. Maps of naked eye star visibility and telescopic limiting magnitudes are useful to quantify the capability of the population to perceive our Universe, to evaluate the future evolution, to make cross correlations with statistical parameters and to recognize areas where astronomical observations or popularisation can still acceptably be made. We present, as an application, maps of naked eye star visibility and total sky brightness in V band in Europe at the zenith with a resolution of approximately 1 km.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 175  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aubrecht, T.; Weil, Z.; Nelson, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night interferes with the development of the short-day phenotype and impairs cell-mediated immunity in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology Abbreviated Journal J. Exp. Zool.  
  Volume (down) 321 Issue 8 Pages 450-456  
  Keywords animals; seasonal timing; chronobiological effects  
  Abstract Winter is a challenging time to survive and breed outside of the tropics. Animals use day length (photoperiod) to regulate seasonally appropriate adaptations in anticipation of challenging winter conditions. The net result of these photoperiod-mediated adjustments is enhanced immune function and increased survival. Thus, the ability to discriminate day length information is critical for survival and reproduction in small animals. However, during the past century, urban and suburban development has rapidly expanded and filled the night sky with light from various sources, obscuring crucial light-dark signals, which alters physiological interpretation of day lengths. Furthermore, reduced space, increased proximity to people, and the presence of light at night may act as stressors for small animals. Whereas acute stressors typically enhance immune responses, chronic exposure to stressors often impairs immune responses. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of dim light at night and chronic stress interferes with enhanced cell-mediated immunity observed during short days. Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were assigned to short or long days with dark nights (0&#8201;lux) or dim (5&#8201;lux) light at night for 10 weeks. Following 2 weeks of chronic restraint (6&#8201;hr/day), a model of chronic stress, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were assessed. Both dim light at night and restraint reduced the DTH response. Dim light at night during long nights produced an intermediate short day phenotype. These results suggest the constant presence of light at night could negatively affect survival of photoperiodic rodents by disrupting the timing of breeding and immune responses.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1574  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: