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Author Wang, X.; Cheng, H.
Title Study on the Temporal and Spatial Pattern Differences of Chinese Light Curl Based on DMSP/OLS Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.
Volume (down) 310 Issue Pages 032072
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Nighttime light data can detect surface gleams that can intuitively reflect human socioeconomic activity.This paper uses the DMSP/OLS nighttime lighting data from 2001 to 2007 to analyze the coupling relationship between regional economic development and nighttime light intensity in China using regression model.The results show that the brightest areas of nighttime light are mainly concentrated in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, the Yangtze River Delta region, and the Pearl River Delta region. With the change of theyear, the brightness of the three regions is brighter year by year, indicating that the economy is more and more developed.The linear regression model of total brightness and GDP of regional light: Y=792.218+0.024X, linear slope is 0.024, indicating a positive correlation trend.The provinces and cities with the highest total brightness of the provinces and cities are Guangdong Province, Shandong Province, and Jiangsu Province, and the lowest provinces and cities are Qinghai Province and Tibet Autonomous Region.The total brightness of regional lights in China's provinces and cities is well coupled with GDP. The total brightness of regional lights in all provinces and cities is weakened from east to west. The brightness of the 11 provinces in the eastern region is the strongest, including Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, Liaoning, Shanghai, and Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian, Shandong, Guangdong, Hainan Province.The second most powerful lighting is the eight provinces in the central region including Shanxi, Jilin, Heilongjiang, Anhui, Jiangxi, Henan, Hubei, and Hunan.The weakest lighting is in the western regions of Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Yunnan, Tibet, Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia, Xinjiang, Guangxi, Inner Mongolia and other provinces (cities).In the east of the Hu Huanyong line, the nighttime lighting is higher than the west of the Hu Huanyong line.The eastern part of China's seven geographical divisions (Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Anhui, Jiangxi, Shandong, Fujian, and Taiwan) has the brightest night lights.The northwestern region (Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region) has a weak night light.The brightness information of nighttime remote sensing data selected in this study can reflect the level of regional economic development.
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ISSN 1755-1315 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2670
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Author Seymoure, B. M., Linares, C., & White, J.
Title Connecting spectral radiometry of anthropogenic light sources to the visual ecology of organisms Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 308 Issue 2 Pages 93-110
Keywords Animals; Ecology; color space; ecological consequences; just noticeable difference; light pollution; photoreceptors; radiance; visual models; visual systems
Abstract Humans have drastically altered nocturnal environments with electric lighting. Animals depend on natural night light conditions and are now being inundated with artificial lighting. There are numerous artificial light sources that differ in spectral composition that should affect the perception of these light sources and due to differences in animal visual systems, the differences in color perception of these anthropogenic light sources should vary significantly. The ecological and evolutionary ramifications of these perceptual differences of light sources remain understudied. Here, we quantify the radiance of nine different street lights comprised of four different light sources: Metal Halide, Mercury Vapor, Light Emitting Diodes, and High‐Pressure Sodium and model how five animal visual systems will be stimulated by these light sources. We calculated the number of photons that photoreceptors in different visual systems would detect. We selected five visual systems: avian UV/VIS, avian V/VIS, human, wolf and hawk moth. We included non‐visual photoreceptors of vertebrates known for controlling circadian rhythms and other physiological traits. The nine light types stimulated visual systems and the photoreceptors within the visual systems differently. Furthermore, we modelled the chromatic contrast (Just Noticeable Differences [JNDs]) and color space overlap for each light type comparison for each visual system to see if organisms would perceive the lights as different colors. The JNDs of most light type comparisons were very high, indicating most visual systems would detect all light types as different colors, however mammalian visual systems would perceive many lights as the same color. We discuss the importance of understanding not only the brightness of artificial light types, but also the spectral composition of light types, as most organisms have different visual systems from humans. Thus, for researchers to understand how artificial light sources affect the visual environment of specific organisms and thus mitigate the effects, spectral information is crucial.
Address Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA; brett.seymoure(at)gmail.com
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Publisher ZSL Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2306
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Author Fukuda, H.; Torisawa, S.; Sawada, Y.; Takagi, T.
Title Developmental changes in behavioral and retinomotor responses of Pacific bluefin tuna on exposure to sudden changes in illumination Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 305 Issue 1-4 Pages 73-78
Keywords animals; fish; animal behavior
Abstract Schooling behavior traits during the process of retinomotor response from scotopic to photopic vision were examined in cultivated juvenile Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT) at 3 different ages. After a sudden change in illumination from darkness to 300 lx, retinal adaptations changed from scotopic to photopic vision. Retinomotor and schooling indices showed strong agreement, with juvenile PBTs forming polarized schools upon complete retinal adaptation to photopic vision. The behavioral and retinal adaptation to sudden illumination took 20, 15, and 10 min after illumination in PBT 25, 40, and 55 days after hatching (dah). At 40 dah, PBT took a longer time to adapt than fish aged 55 dah and showed the highest swimming speed, including momentary bursts of swimming immediately after illumination. This suggested that these fish were swimming at high speed under poor visibility conditions. In contrast, PBT at 55 dah showed a gradual increase in swimming speed that correlated with their retinal adaptation. Therefore, behavioral and retinal adaptation traits changed during growth, suggesting that the high mortality in PBT around 40 dah, due to collisions with the tank and net walls at dawn, may be because these adapt more slowly than fish at 55 dah and were swimming at a relatively high speed under conditions of poor visibility.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1589
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Author Cochran, W.W.; Mouritsen, H.; Wikelski, M.
Title Migrating songbirds recalibrate their magnetic compass daily from twilight cues Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume (down) 304 Issue 5669 Pages 405-408
Keywords *Animal Migration; Animals; Biological Clocks; Calibration; Cues; *Flight, Animal; Geography; *Magnetics; *Orientation; *Solar System; Songbirds/*physiology
Abstract Night migratory songbirds can use stars, sun, geomagnetic field, and polarized light for orientation when tested in captivity. We studied the interaction of magnetic, stellar, and twilight orientation cues in free-flying songbirds. We exposed Catharus thrushes to eastward-turned magnetic fields during the twilight period before takeoff and then followed them for up to 1100 kilometers. Instead of heading north, experimental birds flew westward. On subsequent nights, the same individuals migrated northward again. We suggest that birds orient with a magnetic compass calibrated daily from twilight cues. This could explain how birds cross the magnetic equator and deal with declination.
Address Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL61820, USA. Sparrow@springnet1.com
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ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:15087541 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 57
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Author Kolkert, H.; Smith, R.; Rader, R.; Reid, N.
Title Insectivorous bats foraging in cotton crop interiors is driven by moon illumination and insect abundance, but diversity benefits from woody vegetation cover Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment Abbreviated Journal Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Volume (down) 302 Issue Pages 107068
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract Landscape and biophysical determinants of insectivorous bat activity and community composition in space and time are central to understanding how growers can maximise bat-mediated pest control services in crops. We measured community composition, abundance, richness and foraging attempts of insectivorous bats in the centre of dryland cotton crops using acoustic sampling. We examined how bat activity was related to woody vegetation in the surrounding landscape, prey insect abundance, distance to crop edge, size of field, proximity to waterbodies and moon illumination to better understand insectivorous bat diversity and foraging in crop interiors. We collected a total of 9467 acoustic files including 1198 foraging attempts (feeding buzzes) of at least 21 insectivorous bat species. The bat assemblage in cotton crop interiors (richness and diversity) was positively related to woody vegetation foliage cover within 5–10 km of the crop, as well as Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera abundance, but was negatively related to distance from the field edge into the crop and moon illumination. Increased feeding attempts were linked to increased Lepidoptera and Hemiptera on nights of high moon illumination (> 75 %). Bat activity and foraging was also higher during nights of increased insect abundance, particularly Lepidoptera, indicating that bats track food resources. Our results highlight the importance of managing bat roosting habitat at different landscape scales to enhance bat diversity and foraging in crop interiors and thus insect consumption. Given the high bat feeding activity on nights of high moon illumination and increased Hemiptera abundance, the timing of insecticide sprays to target pests, such as Hemipteran sucking bugs, could be scheduled on nights of low moon illumination. Such information is useful in identifying conservation priorities for the management of bats in intensively farmed agroecosystems and should facilitate habitat management by growers to maximise crop pest protection services in crop interiors.
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ISSN 0167-8809 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3045
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