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Author Manoli, G.; Fatichi, S.; Schlapfer, M.; Yu, K.; Crowther, T.W.; Meili, N.; Burlando, P.; Katul, G.G.; Bou-Zeid, E.
Title Magnitude of urban heat islands largely explained by climate and population Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume (down) 573 Issue 7772 Pages 55-60
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Urban heat islands (UHIs) exacerbate the risk of heat-related mortality associated with global climate change. The intensity of UHIs varies with population size and mean annual precipitation, but a unifying explanation for this variation is lacking, and there are no geographically targeted guidelines for heat mitigation. Here we analyse summertime differences between urban and rural surface temperatures (DeltaTs) worldwide and find a nonlinear increase in DeltaTs with precipitation that is controlled by water or energy limitations on evapotranspiration and that modulates the scaling of DeltaTs with city size. We introduce a coarse-grained model that links population, background climate, and UHI intensity, and show that urban-rural differences in evapotranspiration and convection efficiency are the main determinants of warming. The direct implication of these nonlinearities is that mitigation strategies aimed at increasing green cover and albedo are more efficient in dry regions, whereas the challenge of cooling tropical cities will require innovative solutions.
Address Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31485056 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2669
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Author Portnov, B.A.; Stevens, R.G.; Samociuk, H.; Wakefield, D.; Gregorio, D.I.
Title Light at night and breast cancer incidence in Connecticut: An ecological study of age group effects Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume (down) 572 Issue Pages 1020-1024
Keywords Human Health
Abstract The aim of this study was to test the prediction that within the state of Connecticut, USA, communities with high nighttime outdoor light level would have higher breast cancer incidence rates. Breast cancer cases were identified from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, the oldest within the United States, for years 2005 and 2009 and geocoded to the 829 census tracts in the state. Nighttime light level (LAN) was obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), 1996/97 satellite image, providing a 10-year lag. Regression models were used incorporating the LAN levels and census level data on potential confounders for the whole female population of the state, and for separate age groups. Light level emerged as a significant predictor of breast cancer incidence. After taking account of several potential confounders, the excess risk in the highest LAN level census tracts compared to the lowest was about 63% (RR=1.63; 95% CI=1.41, 1.89). The association of LAN with breast cancer incidence weakened with age; the association was strongest among premenopausal women.
Address Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT 06030, United States. Electronic address: gregorio@uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27531467 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1529
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Author Pattison, P.M.; Tsao, J.Y.; Brainard, G.C.; Bugbee, B.
Title LEDs for photons, physiology and food Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume (down) 563 Issue 7732 Pages 493-500
Keywords Review; Lighting; Human Health; Plants
Abstract Lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) not only is more energy efficient than traditional lighting, but also enables improved performance and control. The colour, intensity and distribution of light can now be controlled with unprecedented precision, enabling light to be used both as a signal for specific physiological responses in humans and plants, and as an efficient fuel for fresh food production. Here we show how a broad and improved understanding of the physiological responses to light will facilitate greater energy savings and provide health and productivity benefits that have not previously been associated with lighting.
Address Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30464269 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2110
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Author Jones, A.; Noll, S.; Kausch, W.; Szyszka, C.; Kimeswenger, S.
Title An advanced scattered moonlight model for Cerro Paranal Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Astronomy & Astrophysics Abbreviated Journal A&A
Volume (down) 560 Issue Pages A91
Keywords Moonlight
Abstract The largest natural source of light at night is the Moon, and it is the major contributor to the astronomical sky background. Being able to accurately predict the sky background, including scattered moonlight is important for scheduling astronomical observations. We have developed an improved scattered moonlight model, in which the components are computed with a better physical understanding as opposed to the simple empirical fit in the frequently used photometric model of Krisciunas & Schaefer (1991, PASP, 103, 1033). Our spectroscopic model can better trace the spectral trends of scattered moonlight for any position of the Moon and target observation. This is the first scattered moonlight model that we know of which is this physical and versatile. We have incorporated an observed solar spectrum, accurate lunar albedo fit, and elaborate scattering and absorption calculations that include scattering off of molecules and aerosols. It was designed for Cerro Paranal, but can be modified for any location with known atmospheric properties. Throughout the optical range, the uncertainty is less than 20%. This advanced scattered moonlight model can predict the amount of scattered moonlight for any given geometry of the Moon and target, and lunar phase for the entire optical spectrum.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-6361 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1461
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Author Commission International de L’Eclairage..
Title Colorimetry Type Report
Year 2004 Publication CIE Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 552 Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 630
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