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Author Brüning, A.; Hölker, F.; Franke, S.; Preuer, T.; Kloas, W.
Title Spotlight on fish: Light pollution affects circadian rhythms of European perch but does not cause stress Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 511 Issue Pages 516-522
Keywords animals; fish; Circadian Rhythm; melatonin; cortisol
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1580
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Author Tollefson, J.
Title Energy: Islands of Light Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 507 Issue 7491 Pages 154-156
Keywords Ecology
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 825
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Author Hou, Z.-S.; Wen, H.-S.; Li, J.-F.; He, F.; Li, Y.; Qi, X.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, K.-Q.; Tao, Y.-X.
Title Effects of photoperiod and light Spectrum on growth performance, digestive enzymes, hepatic biochemistry and peripheral hormones in spotted sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume (down) 507 Issue Pages 419-427
Keywords Animals; fishes; spotted sea bass; Lateolabrax maculatus; Photoperiod
Abstract Growth performance, digestive and metabolic activities, and contents of peripheral hormones of spotted sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus) juveniles were evaluated under natural light and three different light spectrums (white, blue and red) in combination with three photoperiods (light: dark cycle, 12: 12-h, 18: 6-h and 24: 0-h). Bass in 18-h blue light environment displayed the best growth performance and digestive enzyme activities, while red light environment significantly impeded growth and digestive enzyme activities. Altered contents of melatonin, cortisol, thyroid hormones (T3 and T4), and testosterone (T) were observed in bass reared in red light, suggesting that red light could disturb endocrine homeostasis associated with biological rhythm (melatonin), stress coping (melatonin and cortisol), growth and development (T3 and T4), and aggressive behavior or hyperactivity (T3, T4 and T). Impaired growth performance might be due to energy used to cope with stress. We concluded that the red spectrum environment was stressful to spotted bass and the selection of appropriate light conditions (such as 18-h blue light) might lead to a beneficial outcome for spotted sea bass culture.
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ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2329
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Author Cruz, L.M.; Shillinger, G.L.; Robinson, N.J.; Tomillo, P.S.; Paladino, F.V.
Title Effect of light intensity and wavelength on the in-water orientation of olive ridley turtle hatchlings Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume (down) 505 Issue Pages 52-56
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution, associated with coastal development, poses a growing threat to sea turtles. Hatchlings are particularly affected during their crawl to the ocean since they exhibit phototaxis and may move towards or be disoriented by artificial lights. Although much is known about how hatchlings respond to artificial light while crawling to the ocean, far less is known about their response after reaching the water. Here, we investigate how hatchling olive ridley turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) held in artificial pools responded to light of different wavelengths (red, 720 nm; yellow, 660 nm and green, 520 nm) and intensities (0.1–3.3 lx, mean 0.87 lx, SD = 0.85, 10.3–45.9 lx, mean 15.75 lx,SD = 7.12; 47.5–84.2 lx; mean 52.02 lx, SD = 9.11; 91.3–140.8 lx, mean 105 lx, SD = 13.24; 150.1–623 lx, mean 172.18 lx, SD = 73.42). When no light or red light below 39 lx was present, hatchlings oriented at a mean angle of 180° from true north and did not orient towards any discernable feature. However, hatchlings swam towards the light at intensities of red light above 39 lx, yellow light above 10 lx and green light above 5 lx. Our findings indicate that sea turtles will swim towards artificial lights even after reaching the water. Thus, we recommend light mitigation efforts should extend beyond nesting beaches and into the associated oceanic habitats.
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ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1894
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Author Masana, E.; Carrasco, J.M.; Bará, S.; Ribas, S.J.
Title A multiband map of the natural night sky brightness including Gaia and Hipparcos integrated starlight Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 501 Issue 4 Pages 5443-5456
Keywords Instrumentation; night sky brightness; radiative transfer; scattering; atmospheric effects; photometers; light pollution; site testing
Abstract The natural night sky brightness is a relevant input for monitoring the light pollution evolution at observatory sites, by subtracting it from the overall sky brightness determined by direct measurements. It is also instrumental for assessing the expected darkness of the pristine night skies. The natural brightness of the night sky is determined by the sum of the spectral radiances coming from astrophysical sources, including zodiacal light, and the atmospheric airglow. The resulting radiance is modified by absorption and scattering before it reaches the observer. Therefore, the natural night sky brightness is a function of the location, time, and atmospheric conditions. We present in this work the GAia Map of the Brightness Of the Natural Sky (GAMBONS), a model to map the natural night brightness of the sky in cloudless and moonless nights. Unlike previous maps, GAMBONS is based on the extra-atmospheric star radiance obtained from the Gaia catalogue. The Gaia-Data Release 2 (DR2) archive compiles astrometric and photometric information for more than 1.6 billion stars up to G = 21 mag. For the brightest stars, not included in Gaia-DR2, we have used the Hipparcos catalogue instead. After adding up to the star radiance the contributions of the diffuse galactic and extragalactic light, zodiacal light and airglow, and taking into account the effects of atmospheric attenuation and scattering, the radiance detected by ground-based observers can be estimated. This methodology can be applied to any photometric band, if appropriate transformations from the Gaia bands are available. In particular, we present the expected sky brightness for V (Johnson), and visual photopic and scotopic passbands.
Address Departament Física Quàntica i Astrofìsica, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC-UB-IEEC), C Martí Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain; emasana ( at ) fqa.ub.edu
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Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3299
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