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Author Fulbright, J.P.; Xiong, X.
Title Suomi-NPP VIIRS day/night band calibration with stars Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Proc. SPIE 9607, Earth Observing Systems XX, 2015 Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages 96071S
Keywords Remote Sensing; Suomi NPP; VIIRS DNB; calibration
Abstract Observations of stars can be used to calibrate the radiometric performance of the Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Suomi-NPP instrument VIIRS. Bright stars are normally visible in the Space View window. In this paper, we describe several potential applications of stellar observations with preliminary results for several. These applications include routine trending of the gain of the highand mid-gain stages of the DNB and trending the gain ratio between those stages. Many of the stars observed by the VIIRS DNB have absolute flux curves available, allowing for an absolute calibration. Additionally, stars are visible during scheduled lunar roll observations. The electronic sector rotations applied during the scheduled lunar observations greatly increases the sky area recorded for a brief period, increasing the observing opportunities. Additionally, the DNB recorded data during the spacecraft pitch maneuver. This means the deep sky was viewed through the full Earth View. In this situation, thousands of stars (and the planet Mars) are recorded over a very short time period and over all aggregation zones. A possible application would be to create a gain curve by comparing the instrument response to the known apparent stellar brightness for a large number of stars of similar spectral shape. Finally, the DNB is especially affected the mirror degradation afflicting VIIRS. The degradation has shifted peak of the relative spectral response (RSR) of the DNB the blue and the effective band pass has been slightly reduced. The change in response for hot stars (effective temperatures of over 30,000 K) due to this degradation will differ by about 10 percent from the response change of cool stars (below 3500 K).
Address Science Systems and Applications, Inc., USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1260
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Author Cao, C.; Zong, Y.; Bai, Y.; Shao, X.
Title Preliminary study for improving the VIIRS DNB low light calibration accuracy with ground based active light source Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Proc. SPIE 9607, Earth Observing Systems XX, 2015 Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages 96070D
Keywords Remote sensing; Suomi NPP; VIIRS DNB; calibration
Abstract There is a growing interest in the science and user community in the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) low light detection capabilities at night for quantitative applications such as airglow, geophysical retrievals under lunar illumination, light power estimation, search and rescue, energy use, urban expansion and other human activities. Given the growing interest in the use of the DNB data, a pressing need arises for improving the calibration stability and absolute accuracy of the DNB at low radiances. Currently the low light calibration accuracy was estimated at a moderate 15%-100% while the long-term stability has yet to be characterized. This study investigates selected existing night light point sources from Suomi NPP DNB observations and evaluates the feasibility of SI traceable nightlight source at radiance levels near 3 nW·cm−2·sr−1, that potentially can be installed at selected sites for VIIRS DNB calibration/validation. The illumination geometry, surrounding environment, as well as atmospheric effects are also discussed. The uncertainties of the ground based light source are estimated. This study will contribute to the understanding of how the Earth’s atmosphere and surface variability contribute to the stability of the DNB measured radiances, and how to separate them from instrument calibration stability. It presents the need for SI traceable active light sources to monitor the calibration stability, radiometric and geolocation accuracy, and point spread functions of the DNB. Finally, it is also hoped to address whether or not active light sources can be used for detecting environmental changes, such as aerosols.
Address NESDIS/STAR, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1261
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Author Lee, S.; Wang, W.; Cao, C.
Title JPSS-1 VIIRS DNB nonlinearity and its impact on SDR calibration Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Proc. SPIE 9607, Earth Observing Systems XX, 2015 Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages 960717
Keywords Remote sensing; Suomi NPP; VIIRS DNB; JPSS-1; calibration
Abstract During JPSS-1 VIIRS testing at Raytheon El Segundo, a larger than expected radiometric response nonlinearity was discovered in Day-Nigh Band (DNB). In addition, the DNB nonlinearity is aggregation mode dependent, where the most severe non-linear behavior are the aggregation modes used at high scan angles (<~50 degree). The DNB aggregation strategy was subsequently modified to remove modes with the most significant non-linearity. We characterized the DNB radiometric response using pre-launch tests with the modified aggregation strategy. The test data show the DNB non-linearity varies at each gain stages, detectors and aggregation modes. The non-linearity is most significant in the Low Gain Stage (LGS) and could vary from sample-to-sample. The non-linearity is also more significant in EV than in calibration view samples. The HGS nonlinearity is difficult to quantify due to the higher uncertainty in determining source radiance. Since the radiometric response non-linearity is most significant at low dn ranges, it presents challenge in DNB cross-stage calibration, an critical path to calibration DNB’s High Gain Stage (HGS) for nighttime imagery. Based on the radiometric characterization, we estimated the DNB on-orbit calibration accuracy and compared the expected DNB calibration accuracy using operational calibration approaches. The analysis showed the non-linearity will result in cross-stage gain ratio bias, and have the most significant impact on HGS. The HGS calibration accuracy can be improved when either SD data or only the more linearly behaved EV pixels are used in cross-stage calibration. Due to constrain in test data, we were not able to achieve a satisfactory accuracy and uniformity for the JPSS-1 DNB nighttime imagery quality. The JPSS-1 DNB nonlinearity is a challenging calibration issue which will likely require special attention after JPSS-1 launch.
Address NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1262
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Author Smolensky, M.H.; Sackett-Lundeen, L.L.; Portaluppi, F.
Title Nocturnal light pollution and underexposure to daytime sunlight: Complementary mechanisms of circadian disruption and related diseases Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume (up) Issue Pages 1-20
Keywords Human Health; Artificial light at night; cancer; circadian time structure; development and disruption; melatonin; sleep/wake cycle disturbance; sunlight; vitamin D; vitamin D deficiency; circadian time structure; circadian rhythm; desynchrony
Abstract Routine exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) in work, home, and community settings is linked with increased risk of breast and prostate cancer (BC, PC) in normally sighted women and men, the hypothesized biological rhythm mechanisms being frequent nocturnal melatonin synthesis suppression, circadian time structure (CTS) desynchronization, and sleep/wake cycle disruption with sleep deprivation. ALAN-induced perturbation of the CTS melatonin synchronizer signal is communicated maternally at the very onset of life and after birth via breast or artificial formula feedings. Nighttime use of personal computers, mobile phones, electronic tablets, televisions, and the like – now epidemic in adolescents and adults and highly prevalent in pre-school and school-aged children – is a new source of ALAN. However, ALAN exposure occurs concomitantly with almost complete absence of daytime sunlight, whose blue-violet (446-484 nm lambda) spectrum synchronizes the CTS and whose UV-B (290-315 nm lambda) spectrum stimulates vitamin D synthesis. Under natural conditions and clear skies, day/night and annual cycles of UV-B irradiation drive corresponding periodicities in vitamin D synthesis and numerous bioprocesses regulated by active metabolites augment and strengthen the biological time structure. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are widespread in children and adults in developed and developing countries as a consequence of inadequate sunlight exposure. Past epidemiologic studies have focused either on exposure to too little daytime UV-B or too much ALAN, respectively, on vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency or melatonin suppression in relation to risk of cancer and other, e.g., psychiatric, hypertensive, cardiac, and vascular, so-called, diseases of civilization. The observed elevated incidence of medical conditions the two are alleged to influence through many complementary bioprocesses of cells, tissues, and organs led us to examine effects of the totality of the artificial light environment in which humans reside today. Never have chronobiologic or epidemiologic investigations comprehensively researched the potentially deleterious consequences of the combination of suppressed vitamin D plus melatonin synthesis due to life in today's man-made artificial light environment, which in our opinion is long overdue.
Address c Hypertension Center, S. Anna University Hospital, University of Ferrara , Ferrara , Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26374931 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1271
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Author Contin, M.A.; Benedetto, M.M.; Quinteros-Quintana, M.L.; Guido, M.E.
Title Light pollution: the possible consequences of excessive illumination on retina Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)
Volume (up) Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; eye; visual system; light pollution; retina; Ophthalmology
Abstract Light is the visible part of the electromagnetic radiation within a range of 380-780 nm; (400-700 on primates retina). In vertebrates, the retina is adapted to capturing light photons and transmitting this information to other structures in the central nervous system. In mammals, light acts directly on the retina to fulfill two important roles: (1) the visual function through rod and cone photoreceptor cells and (2) non-image forming tasks, such as the synchronization of circadian rhythms to a 24 h solar cycle, pineal melatonin suppression and pupil light reflexes. However, the excess of illumination may cause retinal degeneration or accelerate genetic retinal diseases. In the last century human society has increased its exposure to artificial illumination, producing changes in the Light/Dark cycle, as well as in light wavelengths and intensities. Although, the consequences of unnatural illumination or light pollution have been underestimated by modern society in its way of life, light pollution may have a strong impact on people's health. The effects of artificial light sources could have direct consequences on retinal health. Constant exposure to different wavelengths and intensities of light promoted by light pollution may produce retinal degeneration as a consequence of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium cells death. In this review we summarize the different mechanisms of retinal damage related to the light exposure, which generates light pollution.Eye advance online publication, 6 November 2015; doi:10.1038/eye.2015.221.
Address Centro de Investigaciones en Quimica Biologica de Cordoba, (CIQUIBIC, UNC-CONICET), Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba, Argentina
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26541085 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1291
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