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Author Spur, M.; Houel, N.; Tourre, V.
Title Visualizing Multilayered Geospatial Data In Virtual Reality To Assess Public Lighting Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication ISPRS – International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci.
Volume Xliii-B4-2020 Issue Pages 623-630
Keywords Lighting; Instrumentation; Vision
Abstract With the improvement and proliferation of virtual reality devices, their use for research and professional activity is broadening,fostering the advent of the field of immersive analytics, as is their acceptance among consumers. Other than the heightened sense of immersion into visualized data they provide, they also make displays of much larger apparent size and different positioning practical than what would be possible otherwise. Drawing on these benefits, we implemented a development of Multiple and Coordinated Displays (MCVs) for geovisualization that stacks different layers of data above each other, tilted for legibility. In a formal experiment, we evaluated it and two other, comparable MCV methods implemented in VR for their usefulness in analyzing public perception and soliciting public feedback regarding urban street lighting. In that field, the direction has recently been shifting from purely systemic development to a participatory approach, thus our investigation was into how a system like this could facilitate participation that can yield actionable results. Previous analysis of interaction data and usability questionnaires reveals preferences for certain systems depending on user characteristics, with the stack system showing a slight advantage over a grid of layers and especially over temporal multiplexing. We show that regardless of MCV variation, participants were able to analyze and provide feedback on public lighting situations that can directly contribute to urbanist work. The MCV approach further aided in understanding their choices, as eye-tracking allowed us to analyze attention to individual data layers.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2194-9034 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3105
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Author Arellano, B.; Roca, J.
Title The Extraction Of Urbanized Areas Through Images Of High Resolution Nighttime Lights Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication ISPRS – International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci.
Volume Xliii-B3-2020 Issue Pages 649-655
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Satellite nocturnal images of the earth are a useful way to identify urbanisation. Nighttime lights have been used in a variety of scientific contributions, including studies on the identification of metropolitan areas as well as landscapes impacted by urbanization. However, the study of urban systems by nighttime light imagery has had a fundamental limitation to date: the low spatial resolution of satellite sensors. Although the DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS) has been gathering global low-light imaging data for over 40 years, its 2.7 km/pixel footprint has limited its use for in-depth studies of urban development. The 2011 launch by NASA and the NOAA of the Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) satellite, with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on board, has led to a significant improvement. This instrument has better spatial resolution (742 m/pixel), on-board calibration, a greater radiometric range, and fewer saturation and blooming problems than DMSP-OLS data. However, it still has considerable limitations for the in-depth study of the area and internal structure of urban systems.

The launch of Luojia 1-01 in June 2018 has increased expectations. LJ1-01 is a nano satellite that can obtain high-resolution nocturnal images (130 metres/pixel). The aim of this paper is to analyse, and compare with previous satellites, the new instrument’s capacity to delimit the urbanised area and its efficiency in identifying types of urban landscape (compact, dispersed and rurban). The study cases are Barcelona Metropolitan Region (Spain) and Shenzhen City (China).
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2194-9034 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3106
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Author Kehoe, R.; Sanders, D.; Cruse, D.; Silk, M.; Gaston, K.J.; Bridle, J.R.; van Veen, F.
Title Longer photoperiods through range shifts and artificial light lead to a destabilising increase in host-parasitoid interaction strength Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Ecology; Aphid; climate change; interaction; light pollution; parasitoid; photoperiod; range expansion; stability
Abstract Many organisms are experiencing changing daily light regimes due to latitudinal range shifts driven by climate change and increased artificial light at night (ALAN). Activity patterns are often driven by light cycles, which will have important consequences for species interactions. We tested whether longer photoperiods lead to higher parasitism rates by a day-active parasitoid on its host using a laboratory experiment in which we independently varied day length and the presence of ALAN. We then tested whether reduced nighttime temperature tempers the effect of ALAN. We found that parasitism rate increased with day length, with ALAN intensifying this effect only when the temperature was not reduced at night. The impact of ALAN was more pronounced under short day length. Increased parasitoid activity was not compensated for by reduced lifespan, indicating that increased day length leads to an increase in total parasitism effects on fitness. To test the significance of increased parasitism rate for population dynamics, we developed a host-parasitoid model. The results of the model predicted an increase in time-to-equilibrium with increased day length and, crucially, a threshold day length above which interactions are unstable, leading to local extinctions. Here we demonstrate that ALAN impact interacts with day length and temperature by changing the interaction strength between a common day-active consumer species and its host in a predictable way. Our results further suggest that range expansion or ALAN induced changes in light regimes experienced by insects and their natural enemies will result in unstable dynamics beyond key tipping points in day length.
Address College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32858779 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3107
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Author Senior, K.L.; Ramsauer, J.; McCarthy, M.A.; Kelly, L.T.
Title The influence of weather and moon phase on small mammal activity Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Australian Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal Aust. Mammalogy
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals; moonlight
Abstract Small mammals are commonly surveyed using live trapping but the influence of weather conditions on trap success is largely unknown. This information is required to design and implement more effective field surveys and monitoring. We tested the influence of weather and moon phase on capture rates of small mammals in the Murray Mallee region of semi-arid Australia. We used extensive pitfall trapping data collected at 267 sites, totalling 54 492 trap-nights. We built regression models to explore the relationship between the capture rates of five species and daily meteorological conditions, and across families of mammals, including dasyurids, burramyids and rodents. A relationship common to several taxa was the positive influence of high winds (>20 km h−1) on capture rates. We also identified differences between taxa, with warmer overnight temperatures increasing capture rates of mallee ningaui but decreasing those of Bolam’s mouse. This makes it difficult to determine a single set of ‘optimal’ meteorological conditions for surveying the entire community but points to conditions favourable to individual species and groups. We recommend that surveys undertaken in warmer months encompass a variety of meteorological conditions to increase capture rates and provide a representative sample of the small mammal community present in a landscape.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0310-0049 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3108
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Author Linley, G.D.; Pauligk, Y.; Marneweck, C.; Ritchie, E.G.
Title Moon phase and nocturnal activity of native Australian mammals Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Australian Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal Aust. Mammalogy
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords animals; moonlight
Abstract Moon phase and variation in ambient light conditions can influence predator and prey behaviour. Nocturnal predators locate prey visually, and prey may adjust their activity to minimise their predation risk. Understanding how native mammals in Australia respond to varying phases of the moon and cloud cover (light) enhances knowledge of factors affecting species’ survival and inference regarding ecological and population survey data. Over a two-year period within a fenced conservation reserve, in south-eastern Australia, with reintroduced native marsupial predator and prey species (eastern barred bandicoot, southern brown bandicoot, long-nosed potoroo, rufous bettong, Tasmanian pademelon, brush-tailed rock-wallaby, red-necked wallaby, eastern quoll, spotted-tailed quoll, and naturally occurring swamp wallaby, common brushtail possum, common ringtail possum), we conducted monthly spotlight surveys during different moon phases (full, half and new moon). We found an interaction between cloud cover and moon phase, and an interaction of the two depending on the mammal size and class. Increased activity of prey species corresponded with periods of increasing cloud cover. Predators and medium-sized herbivores were more active during times of low illumination. Our findings suggest that moon phase affects the nocturnal activity of mammal species and that, for prey species, there might be trade-offs between predation risk and foraging. Our findings have implications for: ecological survey design and interpretation of results for mammal populations across moon phases, understanding predator and prey behaviour and interactions in natural and modified (artificial lighting) ecosystems, and potential nocturnal niche partitioning of species.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0310-0049 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3109
Permanent link to this record