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Author Esaki, Y.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N.; Kitajima, T.
Title Association between light exposure at night and manic symptoms in bipolar disorder: cross-sectional analysis of the APPLE cohort Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Human Health; Bipolar disorder; circadian rhythm; dark; light at night; manic symptom
Abstract Previous studies have found that keeping the room dark at night was associated with a decrease in manic symptoms for patients with bipolar disorder (BD). However, the association between light at night of real-life conditions and manic symptoms is unclear. We investigated the association between bedroom light exposure at night and manic symptoms in BD patients. One-hundred and eighty-four outpatients with BD participated in this cross-sectional study. The average light intensity at night during sleep was evaluated using a portable photometer for seven consecutive nights. Manic symptoms were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and scores >/=5 were treated as a “hypomanic state.” The median (interquartile range) YMRS score was 2.0 (0-5.0), and 52 (28.2%) participants were in a hypomanic state. The prevalence of a hypomanic state was significantly higher in the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than in those with <3 lux (36.7% versus 21.9%; P = .02). In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for BD type, depressive symptoms, sleep duration, and daytime physical activity, the odds ratio (OR) for a hypomanic state was significantly higher for the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than for those with <3 lux (OR: 2.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-4.22, P = .02). This association remained significant at the cutoff value of YMRS score >/=6 (OR: 2.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.15-5.46; P = .02). The findings of this study indicate bedroom light exposure at night is significantly associated with manic symptoms in BD patients. Although the results of this cross-sectional investigation do not necessarily imply causality, they may serve to inform beneficial nonpharmacological intervention and personalized treatment of BD patients.
Address Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32238002 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2924
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Author Chang, S.; Wang, J.; Zhang, F.; Niu, L.; Wang, Y.
Title A study of the impacts of urban expansion on vegetation primary productivity levels in the Jing-Jin-Ji region, based on nighttime light data Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume 263 Issue Pages 121490
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Rapid urbanization has generated enormous pressure on natural resources. This study illustrates urban expansion in the Jing-Jin-Ji region and its influence on vegetation primary productivity. Tempo-spatial correlations between a vegetation index and nighttime light intensity are discussed to assess the urbanization effect quantitatively. The results show that: (1) From 1998 to 2018, urban areas gradually expanded outward from their original conglomerations. (2) In the past 20 years, Beijing and Tianjin have developed in different ways. The surrounding satellite cities have mostly developed concentrically, although some cities in Hebei province have developed more linearly. (3) The average primary productivity of the study area in 1998, 2003, 2008, 2013, and 2018 was generally lower than that of non-urban regions of the same year. (4) During the period from 1998 to 2018, the primary productivity of vegetation in the urban built-up areas increased, and the condition of the plant improved.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2925
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Author Cox, D.T.C.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Dzurjak, S.A.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title National Scale Spatial Variation in Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 10 Pages 1591
Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing
Abstract The disruption to natural light regimes caused by outdoor artificial nighttime lighting has significant impacts on human health and the natural world. Artificial light at night takes two forms, light emissions and skyglow (caused by the scattering of light by water, dust and gas molecules in the atmosphere). Key to determining where the biological impacts from each form are likely to be experienced is understanding their spatial occurrence, and how this varies with other landscape factors. To examine this, we used data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band and the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, to determine covariation in (a) light emissions, and (b) skyglow, with human population density, landcover, protected areas and roads in Britain. We demonstrate that, although artificial light at night increases with human density, the amount of light per person decreases with increasing urbanization (with per capita median direct emissions three times greater in rural than urban populations, and per capita median skyglow eleven times greater). There was significant variation in artificial light at night within different landcover types, emphasizing that light pollution is not a solely urban issue. Further, half of English National Parks have higher levels of skyglow than light emissions, indicating their failure to buffer biodiversity from pressures that artificial lighting poses. The higher per capita emissions in rural than urban areas provide different challenges and opportunities for mitigating the negative human health and environmental impacts of light pollution.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2926
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Author Yao, J.Q.; Zhai, H.R.; Tang, X.M.; Gao, X.M.; Yang, X.D.
Title Amazon Fire Monitoring and Analysis Based on Multi-source Remote Sensing Data Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.
Volume 474 Issue Pages 042025
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract In August 2019, a large-scale fire broke out in the Amazon rainforest, bringing serious harm to the ecosystem and human beings. In order to accurately monitor the dynamic change of forest fire in Amazon rainforest and analyse the impact of fire spreading and extinction on the environment, firstly, based on NPP VIIRS data covering the Amazon fire area, the sliding window threshold method is adopted to extract the fire point, and the cause of fire change is monitored and analysed according to the time series. Secondly, based on the time series of CALIPSO data, the vertical distribution changes of atmospheric pollutants in the amazon fire area are analysed, and the comprehensive analysis is carried out by combining NPP VIIRS data. The experimental results show that only NPP VIIRS data is used to predict the fire, and the combination of CALIPSO data can better monitor the forest fire and predict the fire development trend. The combination of optical image and laser radar has greater advantages in dynamic fire monitoring and fire impact analysis. The method described in this paper can provide basic data reference for real-time and accurate prediction of forest fires and provide new ideas for dynamic fire monitoring.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1755-1315 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2927
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Author Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.
Title Toward an atlas of the number of visible stars Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume in press Issue Pages 107059
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Modelling techniques for the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere allow the computation of maps of artificial night sky brightness in any direction of the sky, involving a large number of details from satellite data. Cinzano et al. (2001a) introduced a method of mapping naked eye star visibility at the zenith from large areas based on satellite radiance measurements and Garstang models of the propagation of light pollution. It takes into account the altitude of each land area from digital elevation data, natural sky brightness in the chosen sky direction based on the Garstang approach, eye capability after Garstang and Schaefer, and atmospheric extinction in the visual photometric band. Here we discuss how to use these methods to obtain maps of the average number of visible stars when looking at the night sky hemisphere, finally answering, site by site, the question of how many stars are visible in the sky. This is not trivial, as the number of stars visible depends on the limiting magnitude in each direction in the sky, and this depends on sky brightness in that direction, atmospheric extinction at that zenith distance and the observer's visual acuity and experience. We present, as an example, a map of the number of visible stars in Italy to an average observer on clear nights with a resolution of approximately 1 km.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2928
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