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Author Murphy, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian and circannual regulation in the horse: Internal timing in an elite athlete Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal Journal of Equine Veterinary Science  
  Volume 76 Issue Pages 14-24  
  Keywords Animals; Mammals; horses  
  Abstract Biological rhythms evolved to provide temporal coordination across all tissues and organs and allow synchronisation of physiology with predictable environmental cycles. Most important of these are circadian and circannual rhythms, primarily regulated via photoperiod signals from the retina. Understanding the nature of physiological rhythms in horses is crucially important for equine management. Predominantly, we have removed them from exposure to their natural environmental stimuli; the seasonally changing photoperiod, continuous foraging and feeding activity, social herd interactions and the continuous low intensity exercise of a grassland dweller. These have been replaced in many cases with confined indoor housing, regimental feeding and exercise times, social isolation and exposure to lighting that is often erratic and does not come close to mimicking the spectral composition of sunlight. We have further altered seasonal timing cues through the use of artificial lighting programs that impact reproductive behaviour, breeding efficiency and the development of youngstock. Understanding how these new environmental cues (some stronger, some weaker) impact the internal physiology of the horse in the context of the natural endogenous rhythms that evolved over millennia, is key to helping to improve equine health, welfare and performance, now and into the future. This review provides an overview of the field, highlights the recent discoveries related to biological timing in horses and discusses the implications that these findings may have for the production and management of the elite equine athlete.  
  Address Barbara A. Murphy, School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland; Barbara.murphy(at)ucd.ie  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elseverier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2257  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kocifaj, M.; Wallner, S.; Solano-Lamphar, H.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An asymptotic formula for skyglow modelling over a large territory Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 485 Issue 2 Pages 2214-2224  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract An analytical framework to predict skyglow due to distant sources is presented, which can be applied to model sky brightness from the zenith toward the horizon along a vertical plane crossing the hemisphere in the azimuthal position of a light source. Although various powerful algorithms have been developed over the last few decades, the time needed for calculation grows exponentially with increasing size of the modelling domain. This is one of the key issues in skyglow computations, because the numerical accuracy improves only slowly as the modelling domain extends. We treat the problem theoretically, by introducing an analytical formula that is well-suited for light sources located at intermediate and long distances from an observation point and allows tremendous time savings in numerical analyses, while keeping the error at a low level. Field experiments carried out in Eastern Austria provided a unique opportunity to validate the model using real-sky luminance data. The fact that the theoretical model allows the prediction of sky luminance within an acceptable error tolerance is not only in line with the experimental data, but also provides new means of remote characterization of light emissions from artificial sources. The method is particularly attractive for rapid and simple retrieval of the amount of light escaping upwards from the dominant light sources surrounding the observation point. We expect that the method can advance the numerical modelling of skyglow substantially, because it allows real-time computations for very large territories.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2258  
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Author Datta, S.; Samanta, D.; Tiwary, B.; Chaudhuri, A.G.; Chakrabarti, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sex and estrous cycle dependent changes in locomotor activity, anxiety and memory performance in aged mice after exposure of light at night Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 365 Issue Pages 198-209  
  Keywords Animals; mouse models; locomotor activities  
  Abstract Light-at-night (LAN) can affect mammalian behaviour. But, the effects of LAN on aged rodents remain undefined yet. In the present investigation, aged Swiss Albino mice, habituated in regular light-dark cycle, were exposed to bright-light-pulse (1-hr) at night on the day of study followed by experimentations for assessment of locomotor activities in the open field, anxiety in the elevated plus maze and short-term memory for novel object recognition (NOR) in the habituated field. Under without-bright-light exposure, (a) aged proestrous females showed greater locomotor activities and less anxiety than in aged diestrous females, (b) aged males showed locomotor activities and anxiety level similar to aged diestrous females and aged proestrous females respectively and (c) all animals failed to retain in object discrimination memory. LAN exposure exhibited the continual failure of such retention of memory while animals showed free and spontaneous exploration with thigmotactic behaviour having no object bias and/or phobia, but time stay in objects by animals altered variably among sexes and stages of estrous cycle. Overall, the LAN caused (a) diminution in locomotor activities, rise in anxiety and failure of memory for recognition of both familiar and novel objects in aged proestrous females, (b) hyperlocomotor activities and reduction in anxiety in both males and diestrous females with the failure of memory for recognition of novel objects only in aged males while diestrous females showed enhanced exploration time to both objects during NOR. Thus, nocturnal behaviour of aged mice varies with sex and estrous cycle and light acts differentially on them.  
  Address University of Calcutta, Department of Physiology, 92, APC Road, Kolkata, 700009, West Bengal, India. Electronic address: ncphysiolcu@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30853396 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2259  
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Author Coulthard, E.; Norrey, J.; Shortall, C.; Harris, W.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ecological traits predict population changes in moths Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 233 Issue Pages 213-219  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Understanding the ecological traits which predispose species to local or global extinction allows for more effective pre-emptive conservation management interventions. Insect population declines are a major facet of the global biodiversity crisis, yet even in Europe they remain poorly understood. Here we identify traits linked to population trends in ‘common and widespread’ UK moths. Population trend data from the Rothamsted Research Insect Survey spanning 40 years was subject to classification and regression models to identify common traits among species experiencing a significant change in occurrence. Our final model had an accuracy of 76% and managed to predict declining species on 90% of occasions, but was less successful with increasing species. By far the most powerful predictor associated for declines was moth wingspan with large species declining more frequently. Preference for woody or herbaceous larval food sources, nocturnal photoperiod activity, and richness of habitats occupied also proved to be significantly associated with decline. Our results suggest that ecological traits can be reliably used to predict declines in moths, and that this model could be used for Data Deficient species, of which there are many.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2260  
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Author Leung, L.; Grundy, A.; Siemiatycki, J.; Arseneau, J.; Gilbert, L.; Gotlieb, W.H.; Provencher, D.M.; Aronson, K.J.; Koushik, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shift Work Patterns, Chronotype, and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 1055-9965.EPI-18-1112  
  Keywords Human Health; chronotype; Cancer; epithelial ovarian cancer; Ovarian cancer  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Shift work causing circadian disruption is classified as a 'probable carcinogen' and may contribute to the pathogenesis of hormone-sensitive cancers. This study investigated shift work exposure in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study with 496 EOC cases and 906 controls, lifetime occupational histories were collected and used to calculate cumulative years of shift work exposure, average number of night shifts per month, and average number of consecutive night shifts per month. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations with EOC risk were estimated using logistic regression. Associations were also examined according to chronotype and menopausal status. RESULTS: Over half of the cases (53.4%) and controls (51.7%) worked evening and/or night shifts. There was no clear pattern of increasing EOC risk with increasing years of shift work; the adjusted OR (95%CI) of EOC comparing the highest shift work category vs. never working shift work was 1.20 (0.89-1.63). This association was more pronounced among those self-identified as having a “morning” chronotype (OR=1.64, 95%CI: 1.01-2.65). Associations did not greatly differ by menopausal status. CONCLUSION: These results do not strongly demonstrate a relationship between shift work and EOC risk. IMPACT: This study collected detailed shift work information and examined shift work patterns according to shift times and schedules. The findings highlight that chronotype should be considered in studies of shift work as an exposure.  
  Address Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Universite de Montreal; Department of Social and Preventive Medicine  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30842128 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2261  
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