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Author Hanifin, J.P.; Dauchy, R.T.; Blask, D.E.; Hill, S.M.; Brainard, G.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Relevance of Electrical Light on Circadian, Neuroendocrine, and Neurobehavioral Regulation in Laboratory Animal Facilities Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication ILAR Journal Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Review; Animals  
  Abstract Light is a key extrinsic factor to be considered in operations and design of animal room facilities. Over the past four decades, many studies on typical laboratory animal populations have demonstrated impacts on neuroendocrine, neurobehavioral, and circadian physiology. These effects are regulated independently from the defined physiology for the visual system. The range of physiological responses that oscillate with the 24 hour rhythm of the day include sleep and wakefulness, body temperature, hormonal secretion, and a wide range of other physiological parameters. Melatonin has been the chief neuroendocrine hormone studied, but acute light-induced effects on corticosterone as well as other hormones have also been observed. Within the last two decades, a new photosensory system in the mammalian eye has been discovered. A small set of retinal ganglion cells, previously thought to function as a visual output neuron, have been shown to be directly photosensitive and act differently from the classic photoreceptors of the visual system. Understanding the effects of light on mammalian physiology and behavior must take into account how the classical visual photoreceptors and the newly discovered ipRGC photoreceptor systems interact. Scientists and facility managers need to appreciate lighting impacts on circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral regulation in order to improve lighting of laboratory facilities to foster optimum health and well-being of animals.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1084-2020 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3024  
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Author Larsen, D.A.; Martin, A.; Pollard, D.; Nielsen, C.F.; Hamainza, B.; Burns, M.; Stevenson, J.; Winters, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Leveraging risk maps of malaria vector abundance to guide control efforts reduces malaria incidence in Eastern Province, Zambia Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 10307  
  Keywords Remote sensing  
  Abstract Although transmission of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases is geographically heterogeneous, in sub-Saharan Africa risk maps are rarely used to determine which communities receive vector control interventions. We compared outcomes in areas receiving different indoor residual spray (IRS) strategies in Eastern Province, Zambia: (1) concentrating IRS interventions within a geographical area, (2) prioritizing communities to receive IRS based on predicted probabilities of Anopheles funestus, and (3) prioritizing communities to receive IRS based on observed malaria incidence at nearby health centers. Here we show that the use of predicted probabilities of An. funestus to guide IRS implementation saw the largest decrease in malaria incidence at health centers, a 13% reduction (95% confidence interval = 5-21%) compared to concentrating IRS geographically and a 37% reduction (95% confidence interval = 30-44%) compared to targeting IRS based on health facility incidence. These results suggest that vector control programs could produce better outcomes by prioritizing IRS according to malaria-vector risk maps.  
  Address University of Montana, Missoula, MT, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32587283; PMCID:PMC7316765 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3025  
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Author Bolliger, J.; Hennet, T.; Wermelinger, B.; Bösch, R.; Pazur, R.; Blum, S.; Haller, J.; Obrist, M.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of traffic-regulated street lighting on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract New technological developments modulate the light levels of LED street luminaires according to traffic volumes: light levels are increased given traffic and reduced in its absence. Such dimming of street lights reduces the level of artificial light at night (ALAN) and may thus contribute to mitigate light pollution. To quantify the impact of traffic-driven dimming of street lights on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity in comparison to full light (i.e., dimming functions of luminaires switched off), we mounted 20 insect flight-interception traps and ten batloggers on street light poles along two dimmable street light sections. Insect abundance and bat activity were measured alternately with one week of full street lighting followed by a week with light levels modulated by traffic volumes. In total, 16 dimmed and 16 full-light days were investigated. Overall, traffic-driven dimming reduced light levels by 35%. Weather conditions (warm, dry nights) were the main drivers of insect abundance and bat activity, but traffic-driven dimming resulted in lower numbers of insects caught and reduced bat activity. Among insect groups, Heteroptera benefited most from dimming. For bats, urban exploiters (Pipistrellus spp.) benefited from increased availability of prey at brightly lit street lights, while less frequent species (Myotis spp.) did not benefit from street lighting. We conclude that street light dimming technology may contribute to mitigate negative effects of ALAN on nocturnal organisms, although the measure may not be efficient enough to support light-sensitive and threatened species.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3027  
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Author Feng, D.; Yang, C.; Fu, M.; Wang, J.; Zhang, M.; Sun, Y.; Bao, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do anthropogenic factors affect the improvement of vegetation cover in resource-based region? Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 122705  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Vegetation plays a vital role in ecological systems and, therefore, changes in vegetation reflect the state of the ecological environment. Anthropogenic factors significantly impact vegetation cover. This study investigated variations in vegetation cover and the contribution of anthropogenic factors to these variations using the resourced-based region Shanxi Province as a case study. Theil-Sen median slope analysis and Mann-Kendall tests were used to analyze the vegetation cover change. A series of quantitative and qualitative techniques including spatial econometric modeling and residual analysis modeling were used to assess the effects of anthropogenic factors including ecological policies, urbanization, and coal mining. The results showed that overall, vegetation cover increased in the study area, but parts of the region experienced degradation. Ecological policies have been implemented in Shanxi Province to benefit vegetation cover and have resulted in large-scale human-induced greening. Urbanization had a more significant influence on vegetation cover than did natural factors. The extent of mining areas was not a decisive factor compared to natural factors; however, coal mining did create government revenue and drive economic development. In this manner, government policies could guide anthropogenic factors to create “win-win” scenarios for the environment and economic development. The results of this study promote a deeper understanding of the impact of anthropogenic factors on the ecological environment in resource-based regions.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3028  
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Author Zhang, D.; Jones, R.R.; Powell-Wiley, T.M.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Xiao, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A large prospective investigation of outdoor light at night and obesity in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Environmental Health : a Global Access Science Source Abbreviated Journal Environ Health  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 74  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Circadian rhythms; Light at night; Light pollution; Obesity  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Research has suggested that artificial light at night (LAN) may disrupt circadian rhythms, sleep, and contribute to the development of obesity. However, almost all previous studies are cross-sectional, thus, there is a need for prospective investigations of the association between LAN and obesity risk. The goal of our current study was to examine the association between baseline LAN and the development of obesity over follow-up in a large cohort of American adults. METHODS: The study included a sample of 239,781 men and women (aged 50-71) from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study who were not obese at baseline (1995-1996). We used multiple logistic regression to examine whether LAN at baseline was associated with the odds of developing obesity at follow-up (2004-2006). Outdoor LAN exposure was estimated from satellite imagery and obesity was measured based on self-reported weight and height. RESULTS: We found that higher outdoor LAN at baseline was associated with higher odds of developing obesity over 10 years. Compared with the lowest quintile of LAN, the highest quintile was associated with 12% and 19% higher odds of developing obesity at follow-up in men (OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.00, 1.250)) and women (1.19 (1.04, 1.36)), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that high LAN exposure could predict a higher risk of developing obesity in middle-to-older aged American adults.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, Houston, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1476-069X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32611430; PMCID:PMC7329409 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3029  
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