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Author Riegel, K.W.
Title Light Pollution: Outdoor lighting is a growing threat to astronomy Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1973 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 179 Issue 4080 Pages 1285-1291
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract There have been major qualitative and quantitative changes in outdoor lighting technology in the last decade. The level of skylight caused by outdoor lighting systems is growing at a very high rate, about 20 percent per year nationwide. In addition, the spectral distribution of man-made light pollution may change in the next decade from one containing a few mercury lines to one containing dozens of lines and a significantly increased continuum level. Light pollution is presently damaging to some astronomical programs, and it is likely to become a major factor limiting progress in the next decade. Suitable sites in the United States for new dark sky observing facilities are very difficult to find. Some of the increase in outdoor illumination is due to the character of national growth and development. Some is due to promotional campaigns, in which questionable arguments involving public safety are presented. There are protective measures which might be adopted by the government; these would significantly aid observational astronomy, without compromising the legitimate outdoor lighting needs of society. Observatories should establish programs to routinely monitor sky brightness as a function of position, wavelength, and time. The astronomical community should establish a mechanism by which such programs can be supported and coordinated.
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17835929 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 566
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Author Walker, M.F.
Title Light Pollution in California and Arizona. Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1973 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal
Volume 85 Issue 507 Pages 508-519
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The present and future effect of artificial illumination on ground-based optical astronomical observations in California and Arizona is discussed. It is concluded that the effectiveness of all major observatories in these states is presently or potentially limited by light pollution. Consequently, it is essential that immediate efforts be undertaken to: (1) Control outdoor illumination to lengthen the useful life of existing observatory sites, and (2) Identify and protect the best remaining sites both within and outside the United States. The characteristics and probable locations of the best sites for ground-based optical astronomical observations are discussed.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 567
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Author Vriend, Jerry; Lauber, Jean, K
Title Effects of Light Intensity, Wavelength and Quanta on Gonads and Spleen of the Deer Mouse Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1973 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal
Volume 244 Issue Pages 37-38
Keywords animals; mammals; reprodauction; light spectrum
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1607
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Author Wickham, D.A.
Title Attracting and Controlling Coastal Pelagic Fish with Nightlights Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1973 Publication Transactions of the American Fisheries Society Abbreviated Journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
Volume 102 Issue 4 Pages 816-825
Keywords Animals
Abstract Field experiments were conducted in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate techniques for using sequentially‐operated lamp strings and moving lamps to lead and concentrate light‐attracted coastal pelagic fishes. Fish were successfully led between sequentially‐operated under‐water lamps separated by distances up to 20 meters. Mobile lamps were used to lead fish distances up to approximately 1 kilometer. Fish aggregations which form daily around man‐made structures were held after dark and led clear with moving lamps for capture by purse seine. A combination of nightlighting and man‐made structure fish attraction techniques are proposed for harvesting coastal pelagic fish aggregations which occur around existing petroleton drilling platforms, well heads, and other areas presently inaccessible to conventional fishing gear.
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ISSN 0002-8487 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2452
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Author Croft, T.A.
Title Burning Waste Gas in Oil Fields Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1973 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 245 Issue 5425 Pages 375-376
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract I WAS recently amazed by some night-time spacecraft photographs, exemplified by Fig. 1, that present graphic evidence of waste and pollution. These were obtained by the United States Air Force DAPP system which has sensors in the visible 0.4 to 1.1 µm band and an infrared imaging system in the 8 to 13 µm band (ref. 1 and J. L. McLucas, personal communication). The visible band sensor is Capable of responding to very dim light with a controllable threshold (T. O. Haig, personal communication) and it provided these pictures. The lights of cities are clearly visible, as are the aurora, surface features illuminated by moonlight, and fires such as those caused by burning gas from oil fields and refineries. Much power is evidently being generated to light the cities of the world since at the inhabited areas are clearly outlined. It is also apparent that, in the process of extracting liquid petroleum from beneath the surface of the Earth, abundant gas supply has been discovered but is not used. Being unable to contain the gas or to transport it to a user, it is simply burnt.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2365
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