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Author Pike, R.
Title A Simple Computer Model for the Growth of Light Pollution. Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1976 Publication Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Abbreviated Journal
Volume 70 Issue Pages 116-126
Keywords Skyglow
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 563
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Author Snyder, J.F.; Ashman, J.P.; Brandli, H.W.
Title Meteorological Satellite Coverage of Florida Everglades Fires Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1976 Publication Monthly Weather Review Abbreviated Journal Mon. Wea. Rev.
Volume 104 Issue 10 Pages 1330-1332
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Several bog fires in the Florida. Everglades in the spring of 1974 created a great deal of acrid smoke which was advected northward and reduced visibilities at many locations, including Patrick AFB. A subsidence inversion and low-level southwesterly flow combined on 1 May to send a plume of smoke into central Florida which reduced visibilities to 2 mi or less in areas south of Cape Canaveral. The 1430 GMT NOAA 3 satellite photo revealed the existence of the plume to the Cape Canaveral Forecast Facility (CCFF) forecasters. Later, satellite imagery taken between 1340 and 2110 GMT was received which showed movement of the plume offshore. These photographs gave evidence that timely use of meteorological satellite data can greatly aid in the forecasting of reduced visibilities due to smoke. In addition, high-resolution infrared and visual imagery from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program and NOAA satellites gave strong evidence that these data can be used to pinpoint and monitor brush and forest fires as well as provide local meteorological data vital to the fire fighting effort.
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ISSN 0027-0644 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2388
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Author Walker, M.F.
Title The effects of urban lighting on the brightness of the night sky Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1977 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal
Volume 89 Issue 529 Pages
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract A new study of urban lighting and its effect on the brightness of the night sky indicates: (1) The total light output of cities of similar economic development is at least approximately proportional to their populations. (2) The artificial illumination of the night sky at 45 ° altitude in the direction of the illuminating city varies as I∝ D¯²⁵ .(3) The distance at which cities of a given population produce a brightening of the sky of 0.2 magnitude at 45° altitude toward the city varies as P∝ D2.5 .
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 561
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Author Baker, R.R.; Sadovy, Y.
Title The distance and nature of the light-trap response of moths Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1978 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 276 Issue 5690 Pages 818-821
Keywords Animals
Abstract LIGHT TRAPS of various forms have been used to collect and study moths for well over 100 yr, but surprisingly little is known about how they attract moths. There has been some evaluation of the factors influencing the size of light trap catches1–5 and of the mechanics of the terminal phase of the moth's approach to a light6, but virtually nothing is understood about the light-trap response itself. Such an understanding is perhaps unnecessary when light traps are used solely to collect specimens, but becomes crucial as soon as they are used for quantitative sampling or survey work7. Of particular importance to the interpretation of such work is a knowledge of the distance from which moths orientate with respect to a light source; it seems intuitively that this distance should be fairly large. We present here the results of three experiments designed to determine the distance of response of free-flying moths to an artificial light source. Our results support Sotthibandhu's claim4 that the effective range of a 125 W mercury vapour (MV) lamp is about 3 m. They also lead to speculation concerning the behavioural meaning of the light trap response in moths.
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ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 590
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Author Dewan, E.M.; Menkin, M.F.; Rock, J.
Title Effect Of Photic Stimulation On The Human Menstrual Cycle Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1978 Publication Photochemistry and Photobiology Abbreviated Journal Photochem Photobiol
Volume 27 Issue 5 Pages 581-585
Keywords Human Health
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ISSN 0031-8655 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1193
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