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Author (up) Baker, J.
Title Toad aggregations under street lamps Type Journal Article
Year 1990 Publication British Herpetological Society Bulletin Abbreviated Journal
Volume 31 Issue Pages 26–27
Keywords Animals
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 990
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Author (up) Craig, C. L.; Bernard, G. D.
Title Insect Attraction to Ultraviolet-Reflecting Spider Webs and Web Decorations Type Journal Article
Year 1990 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 71 Issue 2 Pages 616–623
Keywords Animals
Abstract The foraging performance of any predator is dependent on its ability to locate prey. All spiders produce silks and many locate insects by producing silk traps. We measured the reflective properties of silk produced by primitive, non-web-weaving spiders and derived aerial web spinners. We found that primitive spiders produce silks that reflect ultraviolet (UV) light and primitive aerial web weavers spin UV-reflecting catching silks that attract Drosophila. Derived, web-spinning spiders in the genus Argiope, however, produce catching silks that exhibit low reflectivity in the UV and, in fact, reflect little light at all. Nevertheless, Argiope decorate their webs with bright, UV-reflecting bars and crosses that attract prey. We found that more insects were intercepted per hour by decorated webs with spiders than by undercorated webs from which the spider had been removed. In addition, within-web analyses showed that when only half of a web was decorated, more insects were intercepted by the decorated halves than the undecorated web halves. We propose that UV-reflecting decorative silks, together with the UV-reflecting body surfaces of A. argentata, act as a visual display that attracts prey.
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Publisher Ecological Society of America Place of Publication Editor
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 666
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Author (up) Deveson, Sharon L; Arendt, Josephine; Forsyth, Isabel A
Title Sensitivity of Goats to a Light Pulse During the Night as Assessed by Suppression of Melatonin Concentrations in the Plasma Type Journal Article
Year 1990 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 169-177
Keywords animals; goat; Circadian Rhythm; Light intensity
Abstract This study investigates the ability of a 1 h light pulse of different intensities at night to suppress plasma melatonin in goats. Six female Saanen dairy goats, about 2 yr old, were housed in a light-tight shed. The goats were habituated for 1 wk to an 8L: 16D photoperiod (40.70 ± 4.16 &#956;W/cm2; 137 ± 14 lux), lights on 0800 h. A 1 h light pulse, of different intensity on each occasion, was given from 1900 to 2000 h. Light intensity was measured by using a lux meter (mean of 36 measurements at goat's eye level). Five different light intensities were given during December in the order 4.22 ± 0.62 &#956;W/cm2 (14.2 ± 2.1 lux), 0.68 ± 0.09 &#956;W/cm2 (2.3 ± 0.3 lux), 0.26 ± 0.004 &#956;W/cm2 (O.87 ± 0.14 lux), darkness, 40.70 ± 4.16 &#956;W/cm2 (137 ± 14 lux), with 1–3 d between treatments. The goats were bled hourly from 1500 to 1900 h and every 15 min from 1900 to 2100 h, and a last bleed occurred at 2200 h. Dark-phase samples were taken in dim red light (<0.03 &#956;W/cm2; 0.1 lux). Plasma was assayed for melatonin by radioimmunoassay. Suppression of melatonin concentrations increased as light intensity increased as follows: Darkness, 0%; 0.26 ± 0.004 &#956;W/cm2; 0%; 0.68 ± 0.09 &#956;W/cm2; 43.1%; 4.22 ± 0.62 &#956;W/cm2, 71.1%; 40.70 ± 4.16 &#956;W/cm2, 81.2%. Suppression was significant (P<0.05) at light intensities >0.68 &#956;W/cm2, 2.3 lux. A hyperbolic relationship existed between percent suppression and light intensities.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1585
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Author (up) Kerenyi, N.A.; Pandula, E.; Feuer, G.
Title Why the incidence of cancer is increasing: the role of 'light pollution' Type Journal Article
Year 1990 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Medical Hypotheses
Volume 33 Issue 2 Pages 75-78
Keywords Human Health
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ISSN 0306-9877 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 769
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Author (up) Lin, M.C.; Kripke, D.F.; Perry, B.L.; Berga, S.L.
Title Night light alters menstrual cycles Type Journal Article
Year 1990 Publication Psychiatry Research Abbreviated Journal Psychiatry Research
Volume 33 Issue 2 Pages 135-138
Keywords Human Health; Light; menstruation; phototherapy
Abstract Dewan asserted 20 years ago that a bedside light could shorten and regularize the menstrual cycle among women with long and irregular menstrual patterns. To replicate this, seven volunteers slept with a 100-watt bulb by the bedside from days 13–17 of their menstrual cycles, while nine controls similarly used a dim red placebo (photographic safe light). Indeed, the 100-watt bulbs shortened menstrual cycles from a mean of 45.7 days to 33.1 days and reduced variability, but the placebo had no effect. These results suggest that light may have promise for treatment of infertility, for contraception, and for other endocrine interventions.
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ISSN 0165-1781 ISBN Medium
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 532
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