|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Li, Q.F.; Yang, G.X.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, H.
Title A survey of the luminance distribution in the nocturnal environment in Shanghai urban areas and the control of luminance of floodlit buildings Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 38 Issue 3 Pages 185-189
Keywords Lighting
Abstract (up) A survey of the luminance distribution of the nocturnal environment in Shanghai urban areas, which included 11 locations and 16 buildings, was made. The 11 locations could be categorized as commercial, administration, leisure or residential. The average environmental luminance of these was recorded. The authors identified the effects of excessive exterior lighting. The luminance was measured and subjective appraisals made of 16 buildings. The writers have developed an empirical formula for arriving at the brightness level rating for floodlit buildings and recommended corresponding working ranges of luminance.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2715
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Filipski, E.; Li, X.M.; Levi, F.
Title Disruption of circadian coordination and malignant growth Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 509-514
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Biological Clocks; Body Temperature; Cell Cycle Proteins; Cell Line, Tumor; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm; Corticosterone/blood; DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism; Jet Lag Syndrome/complications/physiopathology; Lymphocyte Count; Mice; Neoplasm Transplantation; Nuclear Proteins/metabolism; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group D, Member 1; Osteosarcoma/*pathology/physiopathology; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*pathology/physiopathology; Period Circadian Proteins; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/metabolism; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiopathology; Transcription Factors/metabolism
Abstract (up) Altered circadian rhythms predicted for poor survival in patients with metastatic colorectal or breast cancer. An increased incidence of cancers has been reported in flying attendants and in women working predominantly at night. To explore the contribution of circadian structure to tumor growth we ablated the 24-h rest-activity cycle and markedly altered the rhythms in body temperature, serum corticosterone and lymphocyte count in mice by complete stereotaxic destruction of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) or by subjecting the mice to experimental chronic jet-lag. Such disruption of circadian coordination significantly accelerated malignant growth in two transplantable tumor models, Glasgow osteosarcoma and Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The mRNA expression of clock genes per2 and reverb-alpha in controls displayed significant circadian rhythms in the liver (Cosinor, p=0.006 and p=0.003, respectively) and in the tumor (p=0.04 and p<0.001, respectively). Both rhythms were suppressed in the liver and in the tumor of jet lagged mice. This functional disturbance of molecular clock resulted in down regulation of p53 and overexpression of c-Myc, two effects which may favor cancer growth. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that circadian system could play an important role in malignant growth control. This should be taken into consideration in cancer prevention and therapy.
Address INSERM E 354 Cancer Chronotherapeutics, Hopital Paul Brousse, Villejuif, France. filipski@vjf.inserm.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16596304 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 748
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Baker, B.J.; Richardson, J.M.L.
Title The effect of artificial light on male breeding-season behaviour in green frogs,Rana clamitans melanota Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Canadian Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal Can. J. Zool.
Volume 84 Issue 10 Pages 1528-1532
Keywords animals; amphibians; frogs; green frogs; Rana clamitans melanota; Reproduction; reproductive strategies
Abstract (up) Artificial night lighting (or ecological light pollution) is only now gaining attention as a source of long-term effects on the ecology of both diurnal and nocturnal animals. The limited data available clearly indicate that artificial light can affect physiology and behaviour of animals, leading to ecological consequences at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Aquatic ecosystems may be particularly vulnerable to such effects, and nocturnally breeding animals such as frogs may be especially affected. To address this potential, we quantify the effects of artificial light on calling and movement behaviour in a rural population of male green frogs (Rana clamitans melanota (Rafinesque, 1820)) during the breeding season. When exposed to artificial light, frogs produced fewer advertisement calls and moved more frequently than under ambient light conditions. Results clearly demonstrate that male green frog behaviour is affected by the presence of artificial light in a manner that has the potential to reduce recruitment rates and thus affect population dynamics.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-4301 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 71
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xavier Kerola, D.
Title Modelling artificial night-sky brightness with a polarized multiple scattering radiative transfer computer code: Modelling artificial night-sky brightness Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 365 Issue 4 Pages 1295-1299
Keywords Skyglow; modeling; radiative transfer; Gauss-Seidel; light pollution; Garstang model
Abstract (up) As part of an ongoing investigation of radiative effects produced by hazy atmospheres, computational procedures have been developed for use in determining the brightening of the night sky as a result of urban illumination. The downwardly and upwardly directed radiances of multiply scattered light from an offending metropolitan source are computed by a straightforward Gauss-Seidel (G-S) iterative technique applied directly to the integrated form of Chandrasekhar's vectorized radiative transfer equation. Initial benchmark night-sky brightness tests of the present G-S model using fully consistent optical emission and extinction input parameters yield very encouraging results when compared with the double scattering treatment of Garstang, the only full-fledged previously available model.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 278
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Miller, M.W.
Title Apparent Effects of Light Pollution on Singing Behavior of American Robins Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal Condor
Volume 108 Issue 1 Pages 130
Keywords American Robin; birds; light pollution; morning chorus; dawn chorus; song; Turdus migratorius; animals; communication
Abstract (up) Astronomers consider light pollution to be a growing problem, however few studies have addressed potential effects of light pollution on wildlife. Sunlight is believed to initiate song in many bird species. If light initiates song, then light pollution may be influencing avian song behavior at a population level. This hypothesis predicts that birds breeding in areas with large amounts of artificial light will begin singing earlier in the day than birds in areas with little artificial light. Birds in highly illuminated areas might begin singing earlier than did birds in those same areas in previous years when artificial light levels were known to be, or were presumably, lower. Also, birds should begin singing earlier within a site on brightly lit nights. In 2002 and 2003 I documented initiation of morning song by breeding American Robins (Turdus migratorius) in areas with differing intensity of artificial nocturnal light. I compared my observations among sites and against historical studies. Robin populations in areas with large amounts of artificial light frequently began their morning chorus during true night. Chorus initiation time, relative to civil twilight, was positively correlated with amount of artificial light present during true night. Robin choruses in areas with little, or presumably little, artificial light have almost never begun during true night, instead appearing to track the onset of civil twilight. Proliferation of artificial nocturnal light may be strongly affecting singing behavior of American Robins at a population level.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 39
Permanent link to this record