toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Cajochen, C.; Jud, C.; Munch, M.; Kobialka, S.; Wirz-Justice, A.; Albrecht, U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evening exposure to blue light stimulates the expression of the clock gene PER2 in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages (down) 1082-1086  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Color; Darkness; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Female; Gene Expression/*radiation effects; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Mucous Membrane/metabolism/radiation effects; Nuclear Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Period Circadian Proteins; Transcription Factors/genetics/*metabolism  
  Abstract We developed a non-invasive method to measure and quantify human circadian PER2 gene expression in oral mucosa samples and show that this gene oscillates in a circadian (= about a day) fashion. We also have the first evidence that induction of human PER2 expression is stimulated by exposing subjects to 2 h of light in the evening. This increase in PER2 expression was statistically significant in comparison to a non-light control condition only after light at 460 nm (blue) but not after light exposure at 550 nm (green). Our results indicate that the non-image-forming visual system is involved in human circadian gene expression. The demonstration of a functional circadian machinery in human buccal samples and its response to light opens the door for investigation of human circadian rhythms at the gene level and their associated disorders.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric University Clinics, University of Basel, CH-4025 Basel, Switzerland. christian.cajochen@unibas.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16519674 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 727  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Amaral, S.; Monteiro, A.M.V.; Camara, G.; Quintanilha, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title DMSP/OLS night-time light imagery for urban population estimates in the Brazilian Amazon Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume 27 Issue 5 Pages (down) 855-870  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 701  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Muheim, R.; Phillips, J.B.; Akesson, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Polarized light cues underlie compass calibration in migratory songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 313 Issue 5788 Pages (down) 837-839  
  Keywords Alaska; *Animal Migration; Animals; Calibration; Cues; *Flight, Animal; Geography; *Light; Magnetics; *Orientation; Seasons; Sparrows/*physiology; Sunlight  
  Abstract Migratory songbirds use the geomagnetic field, stars, the Sun, and polarized light patterns to determine their migratory direction. To prevent navigational errors, it is necessary to calibrate all of these compass systems to a common reference. We show that migratory Savannah sparrows use polarized light cues from the region of sky near the horizon to recalibrate the magnetic compass at both sunrise and sunset. We suggest that skylight polarization patterns are used to derive an absolute (i.e., geographic) directional system that provides the primary calibration reference for all of the compasses of migratory songbirds.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden. rmuheim@vt.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16902138 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 243  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Johnsen, S.; Kelber, A.; Warrant, E.; Sweeney, A.M.; Widder, E.A.; Lee, R.L.J.; Hernandez-Andres, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Crepuscular and nocturnal illumination and its effects on color perception by the nocturnal hawkmoth Deilephila elpenor Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication The Journal of Experimental Biology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Biol  
  Volume 209 Issue Pt 5 Pages (down) 789-800  
  Keywords Animals; Color Perception/*physiology; Ecosystem; *Light; Moths/*physiology  
  Abstract Recent studies have shown that certain nocturnal insect and vertebrate species have true color vision under nocturnal illumination. Thus, their vision is potentially affected by changes in the spectral quality of twilight and nocturnal illumination, due to the presence or absence of the moon, artificial light pollution and other factors. We investigated this in the following manner. First we measured the spectral irradiance (from 300 to 700 nm) during the day, sunset, twilight, full moon, new moon, and in the presence of high levels of light pollution. The spectra were then converted to both human-based chromaticities and to relative quantum catches for the nocturnal hawkmoth Deilephila elpenor, which has color vision. The reflectance spectra of various flowers and leaves and the red hindwings of D. elpenor were also converted to chromaticities and relative quantum catches. Finally, the achromatic and chromatic contrasts (with and without von Kries color constancy) of the flowers and hindwings against a leaf background were determined under the various lighting environments. The twilight and nocturnal illuminants were substantially different from each other, resulting in significantly different contrasts. The addition of von Kries color constancy significantly reduced the effect of changing illuminants on chromatic contrast, suggesting that, even in this light-limited environment, the ability of color vision to provide reliable signals under changing illuminants may offset the concurrent threefold decrease in sensitivity and spatial resolution. Given this, color vision may be more common in crepuscular and nocturnal species than previously considered.  
  Address Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA. sjohnsen@duke.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16481568 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 604  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Raven, J.A.; Cockell, C.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence on photosynthesis of starlight, moonlight, planetlight, and light pollution (reflections on photosynthetically active radiation in the universe) Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Astrobiology Abbreviated Journal Astrobiology  
  Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages (down) 668-675  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Photosynthesis on Earth can occur in a diversity of organisms in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) range of 10 nmol of photons m(-2) s(-1) to 8 mmol of photons m(-2) s(-1). Similar considerations would probably apply to photosynthetic organisms on Earth-like planets (ELPs) in the continuously habitable zone of other stars. On Earth, starlight PAR is inadequate for photosynthetically supported growth. An increase in starlight even to reach the minimum theoretical levels to allow for photosynthesis would require a universe that was approximately ten million times older, or with a ten million times greater density of stars, than is the case for the present universe. Photosynthesis on an ELP using PAR reflected from a natural satellite with the same size as our Moon, but at the Roche limit, could support a low rate of photosynthesis at full Moon. Photosynthesis on an ELP-like satellite of a Jupiter-sized planet using light reflected from the planet could be almost 1% of the rate in full sunlight on Earth when the planet was full. These potential contributions to photosynthesis require that the contribution is compared with the rate of photosynthesis driven by direct radiation from the star. Light pollution on Earth only energizes photosynthesis by organisms that are very close to the light source. However, effects of light pollution on photosynthesis can be more widespread if the photosynthetic canopy is retained for more of the year, caused by effects on photoperiodism, with implications for the influence of civilizations on photosynthesis.  
  Address Plant Research Unit, University of Dundee at SCRI, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1557-8070 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16916290 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1198  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: