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Author Moser, M.; Schaumberger, K.; Schernhammer, E.; Stevens, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cancer and rhythm Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages (down) 483-487  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Breast Neoplasms/etiology/physiopathology/prevention & control; Chronobiology Phenomena; Chronotherapy; *Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Life Style; Melatonin/metabolism; Neoplasms/etiology/*physiopathology/prevention & control/therapy; Risk Factors  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16596301 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 786  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Petrželková, K. J.; Downs, N. C.; Zukal, J.; Racey, P. A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A comparison between emergence and return activity in pipistrelle bats Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Acta Chiropterologica Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages (down) 381-390  
  Keywords animals; fying mammals: animal behaviour  
  Abstract Bats may be vulnerable to predation during evening emergence and morning return to their roosts. Early emergence increases the risk of exposure to raptorial birds, but emerging late confers a risk of missing the dusk peak of aerial insects. Here, both emergence and return activity was studied in detail at the same roosts for the first time. We investigated six maternity colonies of pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus) in NE Scotland and recorded light levels and time of emergence and return of the bats with respect to sunset and sunrise on the same nights. Parameters of return activity generally occurred at lower light intensities than those of emergence. Therefore, the interval between dawn return and sunrise was generally longer than that between sunset and dusk emergence. Emergence and return were equal in duration. Bats clustered more on emergence in comparison with return during pregnancy and lactation, whereas during postlactation this trend was reversed.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher BioOne Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1598  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bullough, J.D.; Rea, M.S.; Figueiro, M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Of mice and women: light as a circadian stimulus in breast cancer research Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages (down) 375-383  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*physiopathology; *Circadian Rhythm; *Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; *Light; Light Signal Transduction; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal/*physiopathology; Melatonin/metabolism; Mice; Muridae/metabolism  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Nocturnal rodents are frequently used as models in human breast cancer research, but these species have very different visual and circadian systems and, therefore, very different responses to optical radiation or, informally, light. Because of the impact of light on the circadian system and because recent evidence suggests that cancer risk might be related to circadian disruption, it is becoming increasingly clear that optical radiation must be properly characterized for both nocturnal rodents and diurnal humans to make significant progress in unraveling links between circadian disruption and breast cancer. In this paper, we propose a quantitative framework for comparing radiometric and photometric quantities in human and rodent studies. METHODS: We reviewed published research on light as a circadian stimulus for humans and rodents. Both suppression of nocturnal melatonin and phase shifting were examined as outcome measures for the circadian system. RESULTS: The data were used to develop quantitative comparisons regarding the absolute and spectral sensitivity for the circadian systems of humans and nocturnal rodents. CONCLUSIONS: Two models of circadian phototransduction, for mouse and humans, have been published providing spectral sensitivities for these two species. Despite some methodological variations among the studies reviewed, the circadian systems of nocturnal rodents are approximately 10,000 times more sensitive to optical radiation than that of humans. Circadian effectiveness of different sources for both humans and nocturnal rodents are offered together with a scale relating their absolute sensitivities. Instruments calibrated in terms of conventional photometric units (e.g., lux) will not accurately characterize the circadian stimulus for either humans or rodents.  
  Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA. bulloj@rpi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16596289 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 726  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Powe, N.A; Willis, K.G.; Garrod, G.D. openurl 
  Title Difficulties in Valuing Street Light Improvement: Trust, Surprise and Bound Effects Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Applied Economics Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 38 Issue 4 Pages (down) 371–381  
  Keywords Economics  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1055  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gardner, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The use and misuse of coloured light in the urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Optics & Laser Technology Abbreviated Journal Optics & Laser Technology  
  Volume 38 Issue 4-6 Pages (down) 366-376  
  Keywords Planning; Society; Psychology  
  Abstract The last few years have seen a huge increase in the transfer of coloured architectural lighting, derived from entertainment and theatre, into the urban and exterior environment. Part of the reason for this is that in the last 15 yr or so, there have been a number of important introductions in coloured lighting technology. These have transformed lighting practice, and while their widespread introduction is seen by some as an enrichment of the urban fabric, others see it as presenting considerable dangers, in terms of aesthetics, perception and in terms of civic identity. Its negative effects on the urban environment have been termed ‘colour blight’.

In this paper, the range of coloured lighting technologies is surveyed and other causes for the increase in coloured lighting are also discussed, together with the problems and benefits involved. Finally, some tentative means are put forward for resolving the problems caused by ‘colour blight’. Current good practice is illustrated by the author's own experience, including his consultancy's participation in a number of urban lighting strategies in the UK and elsewhere. This work involves implementation of a comprehensive lighting plan for the historic city of York, as part of the Urban Lighting Group consortium of three lighting design practices.
 
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0030-3992 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2183  
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