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Author Stoffels, W.W.
Title Gravity's pull on arc lamp efficiency Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Europhysics News Abbreviated Journal Europhysics News
Volume 37 Issue 6 Pages 35-38
Keywords (up) Lighting; physics; plasma; gravity; lighting technology; lighting physics; metal halide; hypergravity; microgravity
Abstract (none)
Address Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands; w.w.stoffels(at)tue.nl
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0531-7479 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1367
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Author Doll, C.N.H.; Muller, J.-P.; Morley, J.G.
Title Mapping regional economic activity from night-time light satellite imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Ecological Economics Abbreviated Journal Ecological Economics
Volume 57 Issue 1 Pages 75-92
Keywords (up) Night-time light satellite imagery; Economic activity; Geographic information; Mapping; Scale
Abstract The recognition that the elements of the ‘anthropocene’ play a critical role in global change processes means that datasets describing elements of the socio-economic environment are becoming increasingly more desirable. The ability to present these data in a gridded format as opposed to the traditionally reported administrative units is advantageous for incorporation with other environmental datasets. Night-time light remote sensing data has been shown to correlate with national-level figures of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Night-time radiance data is analysed here along with regional economic productivity data for 11 European Union countries along with the United States at a number of sub-national levels. Night-time light imagery was found to correlate with Gross Regional Product (GRP) across a range of spatial scales. Maps of economic activity at 5 km resolution were produced based on the derived relationships. To produce these maps, certain areas had to be excluded due to their anomalously high levels of economic activity for the amount of total radiance present. These areas were treated separately from other areas in the map. These results provide the first detailed examination of night-time light characteristics with respect to local economic activity and highlight issues, which should be considered when undertaking such analysis.
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ISSN 0921-8009 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 124
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Author Gardner, C.
Title The use and misuse of coloured light in the urban environment Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Optics & Laser Technology Abbreviated Journal Optics & Laser Technology
Volume 38 Issue 4-6 Pages 366-376
Keywords (up) Planning; Society; Psychology
Abstract The last few years have seen a huge increase in the transfer of coloured architectural lighting, derived from entertainment and theatre, into the urban and exterior environment. Part of the reason for this is that in the last 15 yr or so, there have been a number of important introductions in coloured lighting technology. These have transformed lighting practice, and while their widespread introduction is seen by some as an enrichment of the urban fabric, others see it as presenting considerable dangers, in terms of aesthetics, perception and in terms of civic identity. Its negative effects on the urban environment have been termed ‘colour blight’.

In this paper, the range of coloured lighting technologies is surveyed and other causes for the increase in coloured lighting are also discussed, together with the problems and benefits involved. Finally, some tentative means are put forward for resolving the problems caused by ‘colour blight’. Current good practice is illustrated by the author's own experience, including his consultancy's participation in a number of urban lighting strategies in the UK and elsewhere. This work involves implementation of a comprehensive lighting plan for the historic city of York, as part of the Urban Lighting Group consortium of three lighting design practices.
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ISSN 0030-3992 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2183
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Author Raven, J.A.; Cockell, C.S.
Title Influence on photosynthesis of starlight, moonlight, planetlight, and light pollution (reflections on photosynthetically active radiation in the universe) Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Astrobiology Abbreviated Journal Astrobiology
Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 668-675
Keywords (up) Plants
Abstract Photosynthesis on Earth can occur in a diversity of organisms in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) range of 10 nmol of photons m(-2) s(-1) to 8 mmol of photons m(-2) s(-1). Similar considerations would probably apply to photosynthetic organisms on Earth-like planets (ELPs) in the continuously habitable zone of other stars. On Earth, starlight PAR is inadequate for photosynthetically supported growth. An increase in starlight even to reach the minimum theoretical levels to allow for photosynthesis would require a universe that was approximately ten million times older, or with a ten million times greater density of stars, than is the case for the present universe. Photosynthesis on an ELP using PAR reflected from a natural satellite with the same size as our Moon, but at the Roche limit, could support a low rate of photosynthesis at full Moon. Photosynthesis on an ELP-like satellite of a Jupiter-sized planet using light reflected from the planet could be almost 1% of the rate in full sunlight on Earth when the planet was full. These potential contributions to photosynthesis require that the contribution is compared with the rate of photosynthesis driven by direct radiation from the star. Light pollution on Earth only energizes photosynthesis by organisms that are very close to the light source. However, effects of light pollution on photosynthesis can be more widespread if the photosynthetic canopy is retained for more of the year, caused by effects on photoperiodism, with implications for the influence of civilizations on photosynthesis.
Address Plant Research Unit, University of Dundee at SCRI, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee, United Kingdom
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1557-8070 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:16916290 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1198
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Author Marchant, P.R.
Title Investigating whether a crime reduction measure works Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Radical Statistics Abbreviated Journal
Volume 91 Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Public Safety
Abstract Crime is a serious business. It causes great distress and fear. It costs a lot

to deal with its consequences. In these regards crime shares much with

the problem of ill-health and disease. The application of sound science and

statistics has allowed great strides to be made in dealing with problems of

ill health. Medical statistics is one of the recognised, established

disciplines involved in researching healthcare.

The parallels between research in crime reduction and in healthcare do

appear to differ in terms of quality. Although there is still room for

considerable improvement in researching health-care, an investigation

into the underpinning of statistical methods used indicates that the

problems are substantially worse in the study of crime. The consideration

given to statistics in crime studies seems rather flimsy, yet important

claims are made which are statistical at source and may affect policy, and

so can have considerable costs attached. Therefore, for example, it is

important to know whether the underlying crime level has really changed,

rather than just being the result of perhaps sampling variation or some

artefact giving rise to statistical bias or systematic error. This is necessary

when trying to determine whether a Crime Reduction Intervention (CRI)

has actually worked.

I started examining the scientific basis of the claim for the effectiveness for

one particular CRI, basically because I was concerned about negative side

effects and I thought the claim implausible. I remain concerned and

unconvinced. The statistical issues and concerns I raise apply also to

investigating other CRIs and to existing published analyses.

This piece extends work presented in Marchant (2006); earlier work on the

statistical issues involved can be found in Marchant (2005a, b; 2004).
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 452
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