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Author Jasser, S.A.; Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.
Title Light during darkness and cancer: relationships in circadian photoreception and tumor biology Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 515-523
Keywords Human Health; Animals; *Circadian Rhythm; *Darkness; Humans; *Light; Light Signal Transduction; Melatonin/physiology/secretion; Neoplasms/etiology/pathology/*physiopathology; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiology
Abstract The relationship between circadian phototransduction and circadian-regulated processes is poorly understood. Melatonin, commonly a circadian phase marker, may play a direct role in a myriad of physiologic processes. The circadian rhythm for pineal melatonin secretion is regulated by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Its neural source of light input is a unique subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells expressing melanopsin, the primary circadian photopigment in rodents and primates. Action spectra of melatonin suppression by light have shown that light in the 446-477 nm range, distinct from the visual system's peak sensitivity, is optimal for stimulating the human circadian system. Breast cancer is the oncological disease entity whose relationship to circadian rhythm fluctuations has perhaps been most extensively studied. Empirical data has increasingly supported the hypothesis that higher risk of breast cancer in industrialized countries is partly due to increased exposure to light at night. Studies of tumor biology implicate melatonin as a potential mediator of this effect. Yet, causality between lifestyle factors and circadian tumor biology remains elusive and likely reflects significant variability with physiologic context. Continued rigorous empirical inquiry into the physiology and clinical implications of these habitual, integrated aspects of life is highly warranted at this time.
Address Department of Neurology, Light Research Program, Thomas Jefferson University, 1025 Walnut Street, Suite 507, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. samar.jasser@jefferson.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:16596305 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 766
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Author Reiter, R.J.; Gultekin, F.; Manchester, L.C.; Tan, D.-X.
Title Light pollution, melatonin suppression and cancer growth Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 40 Issue 4 Pages 357-358
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Cell Division; Cell Line, Tumor; Humans; *Light; Melatonin/*antagonists & inhibitors; Neoplasms/*pathology; Rats
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Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:16635025 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 798
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Author Srinivasan, V.; Smits, M.; Spence, W.; Lowe, A.D.; Kayumov, L.; Pandi-Perumal, S.R.; Parry, B.; Cardinali, D.P.
Title Melatonin in mood disorders Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry : the Official Journal of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal World J Biol Psychiatry
Volume 7 Issue 3 Pages 138-151
Keywords Human Health; Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use; Biological Markers/blood; Bipolar Disorder/diagnosis/drug therapy/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm/drug effects/physiology; Depressive Disorder/diagnosis/drug therapy/*physiopathology; Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis/drug therapy/physiopathology; Humans; Melatonin/*blood/therapeutic use; Phototherapy; Seasonal Affective Disorder/diagnosis/physiopathology; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/diagnosis/drug therapy/physiopathology; Treatment Outcome
Abstract The cyclic nature of depressive illness, the diurnal variations in its symptomatology and the existence of disturbed sleep-wake and core body temperature rhythms, all suggest that dysfunction of the circadian time keeping system may underlie the pathophysiology of depression. As a rhythm-regulating factor, the study of melatonin in various depressive illnesses has gained attention. Melatonin can be both a 'state marker' and a 'trait marker' of mood disorders. Measurement of melatonin either in saliva or plasma, or of its main metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin in urine, have documented significant alterations in melatonin secretion in depressive patients during the acute phase of illness. Not only the levels but also the timing of melatonin secretion is altered in bipolar affective disorder and in patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD). A phase delay of melatonin secretion takes place in SAD, as well as changes in the onset, duration and offset of melatonin secretion. Bright light treatment, that suppresses melatonin production, is effective in treating bipolar affective disorder and SAD, winter type. This review discusses the role of melatonin in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and SAD.
Address Department of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kota Bharu, Kelantan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1562-2975 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:16861139 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 816
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Author Figueiro, M.G.; Rea, M.S.; Bullough, J.D.
Title Does architectural lighting contribute to breast cancer? Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Journal of Carcinogenesis Abbreviated Journal J Carcinog
Volume 5 Issue Pages 20
Keywords Human Health
Abstract OBJECTIVES: There is a growing interest in the role that light plays on nocturnal melatonin production and, perhaps thereby, the incidence of breast cancer in modern societies. The direct causal relationships in this logical chain have not, however, been fully established and the weakest link is an inability to quantitatively specify architectural lighting as a stimulus for the circadian system. The purpose of the present paper is to draw attention to this weakness. DATA SOURCES AND EXTRACTION: We reviewed the literature on the relationship between melatonin, light at night, and cancer risk in humans and tumor growth in animals. More specifically, we focused on the impact of light on nocturnal melatonin suppression in humans and on the applicability of these data to women in real-life situations. Photometric measurement data from the lighted environment of women at work and at home is also reported. DATA SYNTHESIS: The literature review and measurement data demonstrate that more quantitative knowledge is needed about circadian light exposures actually experienced by women and girls in modern societies. CONCLUSION: Without such quantitative knowledge, limited insights can be gained about the causal relationship between melatonin and the etiology of breast cancer from epidemiological studies and from parametric studies using animal models.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street Troy, NY 12180 USA. figuem@rpi.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-3163 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:16901343; PMCID:PMC1557490 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 746
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Author Muheim, R.; Phillips, J.B.; Akesson, S.
Title Polarized light cues underlie compass calibration in migratory songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 313 Issue 5788 Pages 837-839
Keywords Alaska; *Animal Migration; Animals; Calibration; Cues; *Flight, Animal; Geography; *Light; Magnetics; *Orientation; Seasons; Sparrows/*physiology; Sunlight
Abstract Migratory songbirds use the geomagnetic field, stars, the Sun, and polarized light patterns to determine their migratory direction. To prevent navigational errors, it is necessary to calibrate all of these compass systems to a common reference. We show that migratory Savannah sparrows use polarized light cues from the region of sky near the horizon to recalibrate the magnetic compass at both sunrise and sunset. We suggest that skylight polarization patterns are used to derive an absolute (i.e., geographic) directional system that provides the primary calibration reference for all of the compasses of migratory songbirds.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden. rmuheim@vt.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:16902138 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 243
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