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Author Haus, E.; Smolensky, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biological clocks and shift work: circadian dysregulation and potential long-term effects Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 489-500  
  Keywords Human Health; Adaptation, Physiological; Animals; Biological Clocks; Cardiovascular Abnormalities/etiology; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/physiopathology; Chronobiology Phenomena; Humans; Neoplasms/etiology; Occupational Diseases/*etiology; Risk Factors; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiopathology; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract Long-term epidemiologic studies on large numbers of night and rotating shift workers have suggested an increase in the incidence of breast and colon cancer in these populations. These studies suffer from poor definition and quantification of the work schedules of the exposed subjects. Against this background, the pathophysiology of phase shift and phase adaptation is reviewed. A phase shift as experienced in night and rotating shift work involves desynchronization at the molecular level in the circadian oscillators in the central nervous tissue and in most peripheral tissues of the body. There is a change in the coordination between oscillators with transient loss of control by the master-oscillator (the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus, SCN) in the hypothalamus. The implications of the pathophysiology of phase shift are discussed for long-term health effects and for the design of ergonomic work schedules minimizing the adverse health effects upon the worker.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, University of Minnesota, Health Partners Medical Group, Regions Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota 55101, USA. Erhard.X.Haus@Healthpartners.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16596302 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial (down) 760  
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Author Filipski, E.; Li, X.M.; Levi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disruption of circadian coordination and malignant growth Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 509-514  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Biological Clocks; Body Temperature; Cell Cycle Proteins; Cell Line, Tumor; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm; Corticosterone/blood; DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism; Jet Lag Syndrome/complications/physiopathology; Lymphocyte Count; Mice; Neoplasm Transplantation; Nuclear Proteins/metabolism; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group D, Member 1; Osteosarcoma/*pathology/physiopathology; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*pathology/physiopathology; Period Circadian Proteins; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/metabolism; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiopathology; Transcription Factors/metabolism  
  Abstract Altered circadian rhythms predicted for poor survival in patients with metastatic colorectal or breast cancer. An increased incidence of cancers has been reported in flying attendants and in women working predominantly at night. To explore the contribution of circadian structure to tumor growth we ablated the 24-h rest-activity cycle and markedly altered the rhythms in body temperature, serum corticosterone and lymphocyte count in mice by complete stereotaxic destruction of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) or by subjecting the mice to experimental chronic jet-lag. Such disruption of circadian coordination significantly accelerated malignant growth in two transplantable tumor models, Glasgow osteosarcoma and Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The mRNA expression of clock genes per2 and reverb-alpha in controls displayed significant circadian rhythms in the liver (Cosinor, p=0.006 and p=0.003, respectively) and in the tumor (p=0.04 and p<0.001, respectively). Both rhythms were suppressed in the liver and in the tumor of jet lagged mice. This functional disturbance of molecular clock resulted in down regulation of p53 and overexpression of c-Myc, two effects which may favor cancer growth. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that circadian system could play an important role in malignant growth control. This should be taken into consideration in cancer prevention and therapy.  
  Address INSERM E 354 Cancer Chronotherapeutics, Hopital Paul Brousse, Villejuif, France. filipski@vjf.inserm.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16596304 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial (down) 748  
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Author Figueiro, M.G.; Rea, M.S.; Bullough, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does architectural lighting contribute to breast cancer? Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Journal of Carcinogenesis Abbreviated Journal J Carcinog  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 20  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: There is a growing interest in the role that light plays on nocturnal melatonin production and, perhaps thereby, the incidence of breast cancer in modern societies. The direct causal relationships in this logical chain have not, however, been fully established and the weakest link is an inability to quantitatively specify architectural lighting as a stimulus for the circadian system. The purpose of the present paper is to draw attention to this weakness. DATA SOURCES AND EXTRACTION: We reviewed the literature on the relationship between melatonin, light at night, and cancer risk in humans and tumor growth in animals. More specifically, we focused on the impact of light on nocturnal melatonin suppression in humans and on the applicability of these data to women in real-life situations. Photometric measurement data from the lighted environment of women at work and at home is also reported. DATA SYNTHESIS: The literature review and measurement data demonstrate that more quantitative knowledge is needed about circadian light exposures actually experienced by women and girls in modern societies. CONCLUSION: Without such quantitative knowledge, limited insights can be gained about the causal relationship between melatonin and the etiology of breast cancer from epidemiological studies and from parametric studies using animal models.  
  Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street Troy, NY 12180 USA. figuem@rpi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-3163 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16901343; PMCID:PMC1557490 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial (down) 746  
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Author Curtis, A.M.; FitzGerald, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Central and peripheral clocks in cardiovascular and metabolic function Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med  
  Volume 38 Issue 8 Pages 552-559  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial (down) 730  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chalkias, C.; Petrakis, M.; Psiloglou, B.; Lianou, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modelling of light pollution in suburban areas using remotely sensed imagery and GIS Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 79 Issue 1 Pages 57-63  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Air Pollutants/*analysis; Cities; Environmental Monitoring/*methods; *Geographic Information Systems; Greece; Humans; *Light; Models, Theoretical; *Suburban Health  
  Abstract This paper describes a methodology for modelling light pollution using geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technology. The proposed approach attempts to address the issue of environmental assessment in sensitive suburban areas. The modern way of life in developing countries is conductive to environmental degradation in urban and suburban areas. One specific parameter for this degradation is light pollution due to intense artificial night lighting. This paper aims to assess this parameter for the Athens metropolitan area, using modern analytical and data capturing technologies. For this purpose, night-time satellite images and analogue maps have been used in order to create the spatial database of the GIS for the study area. Using GIS advanced analytical functionality, visibility analysis was implemented. The outputs for this analysis are a series of maps reflecting direct and indirect light pollution around the city of Athens. Direct light pollution corresponds to optical contact with artificial night light sources, while indirect light pollution corresponds to optical contact with the sky glow above the city. Additionally, the assessment of light pollution in different periods allows for dynamic evaluation of the phenomenon. The case study demonstrates high levels of light pollution in Athens suburban areas and its increase over the last decade.  
  Address Department of Geography, Harokopio University, El. Venizelou Str., Kalithea, 17671 Athens, Greece. xalkias@hua.gr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16171928 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial (down) 729  
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