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Author Sella, K.N.; Salmon, M.; Witherington, B.E.
Title (up) Filtered Streetlights Attract Hatchling Marine Turtles Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal Chelonian Conservation and Biology
Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 255-261
Keywords Reptilia; Testudines; Cheloniidae; Loggerhead turtle; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; hatchlings; artificial lighting; light “trapping”; orientation; seafinding; Florida
Abstract On many nesting beaches, hatchling marine turtles are exposed to poled street lighting that disrupts their ability to crawl to the sea. Experiments were done to determine how hatchlings responded to street lighting transmitted through 2 filters that excluded the most disruptive wavelengths (those <&#8201;530 nm; those <&#8201;570 nm). Filtered lighting, however, also attracted the turtles though not as strongly as an unfiltered (high-pressure sodium vapor) lighting. Filtering is therefore of limited utility for light management, especially since other alternatives (such as lowering, shielding, or turning off unnecessary lighting; use of dimmer lights embedded in roadways) are more effective.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1071-8443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 78
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Author Stoffels, W.W.
Title (up) Gravity's pull on arc lamp efficiency Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Europhysics News Abbreviated Journal Europhysics News
Volume 37 Issue 6 Pages 35-38
Keywords Lighting; physics; plasma; gravity; lighting technology; lighting physics; metal halide; hypergravity; microgravity
Abstract (none)
Address Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands; w.w.stoffels(at)tue.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0531-7479 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1367
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Author Raven, J.A.; Cockell, C.S.
Title (up) Influence on photosynthesis of starlight, moonlight, planetlight, and light pollution (reflections on photosynthetically active radiation in the universe) Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Astrobiology Abbreviated Journal Astrobiology
Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 668-675
Keywords Plants
Abstract Photosynthesis on Earth can occur in a diversity of organisms in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) range of 10 nmol of photons m(-2) s(-1) to 8 mmol of photons m(-2) s(-1). Similar considerations would probably apply to photosynthetic organisms on Earth-like planets (ELPs) in the continuously habitable zone of other stars. On Earth, starlight PAR is inadequate for photosynthetically supported growth. An increase in starlight even to reach the minimum theoretical levels to allow for photosynthesis would require a universe that was approximately ten million times older, or with a ten million times greater density of stars, than is the case for the present universe. Photosynthesis on an ELP using PAR reflected from a natural satellite with the same size as our Moon, but at the Roche limit, could support a low rate of photosynthesis at full Moon. Photosynthesis on an ELP-like satellite of a Jupiter-sized planet using light reflected from the planet could be almost 1% of the rate in full sunlight on Earth when the planet was full. These potential contributions to photosynthesis require that the contribution is compared with the rate of photosynthesis driven by direct radiation from the star. Light pollution on Earth only energizes photosynthesis by organisms that are very close to the light source. However, effects of light pollution on photosynthesis can be more widespread if the photosynthetic canopy is retained for more of the year, caused by effects on photoperiodism, with implications for the influence of civilizations on photosynthesis.
Address Plant Research Unit, University of Dundee at SCRI, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee, United Kingdom
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1557-8070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16916290 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1198
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Author Marchant, P.R.
Title (up) Investigating whether a crime reduction measure works Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Radical Statistics Abbreviated Journal
Volume 91 Issue Pages
Keywords Public Safety
Abstract Crime is a serious business. It causes great distress and fear. It costs a lot

to deal with its consequences. In these regards crime shares much with

the problem of ill-health and disease. The application of sound science and

statistics has allowed great strides to be made in dealing with problems of

ill health. Medical statistics is one of the recognised, established

disciplines involved in researching healthcare.

The parallels between research in crime reduction and in healthcare do

appear to differ in terms of quality. Although there is still room for

considerable improvement in researching health-care, an investigation

into the underpinning of statistical methods used indicates that the

problems are substantially worse in the study of crime. The consideration

given to statistics in crime studies seems rather flimsy, yet important

claims are made which are statistical at source and may affect policy, and

so can have considerable costs attached. Therefore, for example, it is

important to know whether the underlying crime level has really changed,

rather than just being the result of perhaps sampling variation or some

artefact giving rise to statistical bias or systematic error. This is necessary

when trying to determine whether a Crime Reduction Intervention (CRI)

has actually worked.

I started examining the scientific basis of the claim for the effectiveness for

one particular CRI, basically because I was concerned about negative side

effects and I thought the claim implausible. I remain concerned and

unconvinced. The statistical issues and concerns I raise apply also to

investigating other CRIs and to existing published analyses.

This piece extends work presented in Marchant (2006); earlier work on the

statistical issues involved can be found in Marchant (2005a, b; 2004).
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 452
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Author Jasser, S.A.; Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.
Title (up) Light during darkness and cancer: relationships in circadian photoreception and tumor biology Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 515-523
Keywords Human Health; Animals; *Circadian Rhythm; *Darkness; Humans; *Light; Light Signal Transduction; Melatonin/physiology/secretion; Neoplasms/etiology/pathology/*physiopathology; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiology
Abstract The relationship between circadian phototransduction and circadian-regulated processes is poorly understood. Melatonin, commonly a circadian phase marker, may play a direct role in a myriad of physiologic processes. The circadian rhythm for pineal melatonin secretion is regulated by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Its neural source of light input is a unique subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells expressing melanopsin, the primary circadian photopigment in rodents and primates. Action spectra of melatonin suppression by light have shown that light in the 446-477 nm range, distinct from the visual system's peak sensitivity, is optimal for stimulating the human circadian system. Breast cancer is the oncological disease entity whose relationship to circadian rhythm fluctuations has perhaps been most extensively studied. Empirical data has increasingly supported the hypothesis that higher risk of breast cancer in industrialized countries is partly due to increased exposure to light at night. Studies of tumor biology implicate melatonin as a potential mediator of this effect. Yet, causality between lifestyle factors and circadian tumor biology remains elusive and likely reflects significant variability with physiologic context. Continued rigorous empirical inquiry into the physiology and clinical implications of these habitual, integrated aspects of life is highly warranted at this time.
Address Department of Neurology, Light Research Program, Thomas Jefferson University, 1025 Walnut Street, Suite 507, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. samar.jasser@jefferson.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16596305 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 766
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