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Author Laaksonen, J.; Laaksonen, T.; Itämies, J.; Rytkönen, S.; Välimäki, P.
Title A new efficient bait-trap model for Lepidoptera surveys – the “ Oulu ” model. Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Entomologica Fennica Abbreviated Journal
Volume 17 Issue Pages 153–160
Keywords Animals
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 607
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Author Stoffels, W.W.
Title Gravity's pull on arc lamp efficiency Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Europhysics News Abbreviated Journal Europhysics News
Volume 37 Issue 6 Pages 35-38
Keywords Lighting; physics; plasma; gravity; lighting technology; lighting physics; metal halide; hypergravity; microgravity
Abstract (none)
Address Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands; w.w.stoffels(at)tue.nl
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ISSN 0531-7479 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1367
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Author Petrželková, K. J.; Downs, N. C.; Zukal, J.; Racey, P. A.
Title A comparison between emergence and return activity in pipistrelle bats Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Acta Chiropterologica Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 381-390
Keywords animals; fying mammals: animal behaviour
Abstract Bats may be vulnerable to predation during evening emergence and morning return to their roosts. Early emergence increases the risk of exposure to raptorial birds, but emerging late confers a risk of missing the dusk peak of aerial insects. Here, both emergence and return activity was studied in detail at the same roosts for the first time. We investigated six maternity colonies of pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus) in NE Scotland and recorded light levels and time of emergence and return of the bats with respect to sunset and sunrise on the same nights. Parameters of return activity generally occurred at lower light intensities than those of emergence. Therefore, the interval between dawn return and sunrise was generally longer than that between sunset and dusk emergence. Emergence and return were equal in duration. Bats clustered more on emergence in comparison with return during pregnancy and lactation, whereas during postlactation this trend was reversed.
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Publisher BioOne Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1598
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Author Chalkias, C.; Petrakis, M.; Psiloglou, B.; Lianou, M.
Title Modelling of light pollution in suburban areas using remotely sensed imagery and GIS Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage
Volume 79 Issue 1 Pages 57-63
Keywords Remote Sensing; Air Pollutants/*analysis; Cities; Environmental Monitoring/*methods; *Geographic Information Systems; Greece; Humans; *Light; Models, Theoretical; *Suburban Health
Abstract This paper describes a methodology for modelling light pollution using geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technology. The proposed approach attempts to address the issue of environmental assessment in sensitive suburban areas. The modern way of life in developing countries is conductive to environmental degradation in urban and suburban areas. One specific parameter for this degradation is light pollution due to intense artificial night lighting. This paper aims to assess this parameter for the Athens metropolitan area, using modern analytical and data capturing technologies. For this purpose, night-time satellite images and analogue maps have been used in order to create the spatial database of the GIS for the study area. Using GIS advanced analytical functionality, visibility analysis was implemented. The outputs for this analysis are a series of maps reflecting direct and indirect light pollution around the city of Athens. Direct light pollution corresponds to optical contact with artificial night light sources, while indirect light pollution corresponds to optical contact with the sky glow above the city. Additionally, the assessment of light pollution in different periods allows for dynamic evaluation of the phenomenon. The case study demonstrates high levels of light pollution in Athens suburban areas and its increase over the last decade.
Address Department of Geography, Harokopio University, El. Venizelou Str., Kalithea, 17671 Athens, Greece. xalkias@hua.gr
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16171928 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 729
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Author Ruger, M.; Gordijn, M.C.M.; Beersma, D.G.M.; de Vries, B.; Daan, S.
Title Time-of-day-dependent effects of bright light exposure on human psychophysiology: comparison of daytime and nighttime exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol
Volume 290 Issue 5 Pages R1413-20
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Body Temperature/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Fatigue/*physiopathology; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Hydrocortisone/*blood; *Light; Sleep Stages/*physiology
Abstract Bright light can influence human psychophysiology instantaneously by inducing endocrine (suppression of melatonin, increasing cortisol levels), other physiological changes (enhancement of core body temperature), and psychological changes (reduction of sleepiness, increase of alertness). Its broad range of action is reflected in the wide field of applications, ranging from optimizing a work environment to treating depressed patients. For optimally applying bright light and understanding its mechanism, it is crucial to know whether its effects depend on the time of day. In this paper, we report the effects of bright light given at two different times of day on psychological and physiological parameters. Twenty-four subjects participated in two experiments (n = 12 each). All subjects were nonsmoking, healthy young males (18-30 yr). In both experiments, subjects were exposed to either bright light (5,000 lux) or dim light <10 lux (control condition) either between 12:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. (experiment A) or between midnight and 4:00 A.M. (experiment B). Hourly measurements included salivary cortisol concentrations, electrocardiogram, sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale), fatigue, and energy ratings (Visual Analog Scale). Core body temperature was measured continuously throughout the experiments. Bright light had a time-dependent effect on heart rate and core body temperature; i.e., bright light exposure at night, but not in daytime, increased heart rate and enhanced core body temperature. It had no significant effect at all on cortisol. The effect of bright light on the psychological variables was time independent, since nighttime and daytime bright light reduced sleepiness and fatigue significantly and similarly.
Address Department of Chronobiology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. Melanie.Rueger@med.nyu.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0363-6119 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16373441 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 801
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