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Author (up) Agnew, J.; Gillespie, T.W.; Gonzalez, J.; Min, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Baghdad Nights: Evaluating the US Military ‘Surge’ Using Nighttime Light Signatures Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Environment and Planning A Abbreviated Journal Environ Plan A  
  Volume 40 Issue 10 Pages 2285-2295  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Commentary  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0308-518X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2028  
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Author (up) Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C. D.; Ziskin, D.; Longcore, T.; Rich, C. url  openurl
  Title 'When the lights stay on' – A novel approach to assessing human impact on the environment. Earth. Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Earthzine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ecology  
  Abstract A consequence of the explosive expansion of human civilization has been the global loss of biodiversity and changes to life-sustaining geophysical processes of Earth. The footprint of human occupation is uniquely visible from space in the form of artificial night lighting – ranging from the burning of the rainforest to massive offshore fisheries to omnipresent lights of cities, towns, and villages. This article describes a novel approach to assessing global human impact using satellite observed nighttime lights. The results provide reef managers and governments a first-pass screening tool for reef conservation projects. Sites requiring restoration and precautionary actions can be identified and assessed further in more focused investigations. We hope to create a mental picture for others to see and encourage participation in maintaining and restoring the natural world.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 569  
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Author (up) Baumeister, J. url  openurl
  Title Adaptives Stadtlicht: Untersuchung einer sich an Passanten und Umweltbedingungen anpassenden LED-Beleuchtung urbaner Räume. Braunschweig: Technische Universität Carolo-Wilhelmina. Type Book Whole
  Year 2008 Publication Technische Universität Braunschweig Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Society  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Doctoral thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 992  
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Author (up) Brainard, G.C.; Sliney, D.; Hanifin, J.P.; Glickman, G.; Byrne, B.; Greeson, J.M.; Jasser, S.; Gerner, E.; Rollag, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sensitivity of the human circadian system to short-wavelength (420-nm) light Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 23 Issue 5 Pages 379-386  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Models, Biological; Neurosecretory Systems; Photons; Pineal Gland/metabolism; Retinal Ganglion Cells/*metabolism; Vision, Ocular  
  Abstract The circadian and neurobehavioral effects of light are primarily mediated by a retinal ganglion cell photoreceptor in the mammalian eye containing the photopigment melanopsin. Nine action spectrum studies using rodents, monkeys, and humans for these responses indicate peak sensitivities in the blue region of the visible spectrum ranging from 459 to 484 nm, with some disagreement in short-wavelength sensitivity of the spectrum. The aim of this work was to quantify the sensitivity of human volunteers to monochromatic 420-nm light for plasma melatonin suppression. Adult female (n=14) and male (n=12) subjects participated in 2 studies, each employing a within-subjects design. In a fluence-response study, subjects (n=8) were tested with 8 light irradiances at 420 nm ranging over a 4-log unit photon density range of 10(10) to 10(14) photons/cm(2)/sec and 1 dark exposure control night. In the other study, subjects (n=18) completed an experiment comparing melatonin suppression with equal photon doses (1.21 x 10(13) photons/cm(2)/sec) of 420 nm and 460 nm monochromatic light and a dark exposure control night. The first study demonstrated a clear fluence-response relationship between 420-nm light and melatonin suppression (p<0.001) with a half-saturation constant of 2.74 x 10(11) photons/cm(2)/sec. The second study showed that 460-nm light is significantly stronger than 420-nm light for suppressing melatonin (p<0.04). Together, the results clarify the visible short-wavelength sensitivity of the human melatonin suppression action spectrum. This basic physiological finding may be useful for optimizing lighting for therapeutic and other applications.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. george.brainard@jefferson.edu  
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  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:18838601 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 724  
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Author (up) Brons JA; Bullogh JD; Rea MS url  openurl
  Title Outdoor site-lighting performance: A comprehensive and quantitative framework for assessing light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 40 Issue Pages 201-204  
  Keywords lighting technology, lighting design  
  Abstract Outdoor Site-Lighting Performance (OSP) is a comprehensive method for predicting and measuring three different aspects of light pollution: glow, trespass and glare. OSP is based upon the philosophy that a rational framework is necessary for optimising private and public desires for and against night-time lighting. Results are presented from over one hundred outdoor lighting installations that provide an empirical foundation for acknowledging the benefits of night-time lighting while establishing limits on light pollution. Recommended limits for glow, trespass and glare are offered to stimulate discussion among all stakeholders concerned with night-time lighting.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1426  
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