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Author (up) Kloog, I.; Haim, A.; Stevens, R.G.; Barchana, M.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night co-distributes with incident breast but not lung cancer in the female population of Israel Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 65-81  
  Keywords Human Health; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Female; Humans; Israel/epidemiology; *Light; Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology; Multivariate Analysis; Risk Factors  
  Abstract Recent studies of shift-working women have reported that excessive exposure to light at night (LAN) may be a risk factor for breast cancer. However, no studies have yet attempted to examine the co-distribution of LAN and breast cancer incidence on a population level with the goal to assess the coherence of these earlier findings with population trends. Coherence is one of Hill's “criteria” (actually, viewpoints) for an inference of causality. Nighttime satellite images were used to estimate LAN levels in 147 communities in Israel. Multiple regression analysis was performed to investigate the association between LAN and breast cancer incidence rates and, as a test of the specificity of our method, lung cancer incidence rates in women across localities under the prediction of a link with breast cancer but not lung cancer. After adjusting for several variables available on a population level, such as ethnic makeup, birth rate, population density, and local income level, a strong positive association between LAN intensity and breast cancer rate was revealed (p<0.05), and this association strengthened (p<0.01) when only statistically significant factors were filtered out by stepwise regression analysis. Concurrently, no association was found between LAN intensity and lung cancer rate. These results provide coherence of the previously reported case-control and cohort studies with the co-distribution of LAN and breast cancer on a population basis. The analysis yielded an estimated 73% higher breast cancer incidence in the highest LAN exposed communities compared to the lowest LAN exposed communities.  
  Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:18293150 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 528  
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Author (up) Kolstad, H.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nightshift work and risk of breast cancer and other cancers--a critical review of the epidemiologic evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Work Environ Health  
  Volume 34 Issue 1 Pages 5-22  
  Keywords Human Health  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0355-3140 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 771  
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Author (up) Kuijper, D.P.J.; Schut, J.; van Dullemen, D.; Toorman, H.; Goossens, N.; Ouwehand, J.; Limpens, H.J.G.A. url  openurl
  Title Experimental evidence of light disturbance along the commuting routes of pond bats (Myotis dasycneme) Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Lutra Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 37-49  
  Keywords Animals; ecological connectivity; conservation; illumination; foraging; turning behaviour  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 404  
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Author (up) Kunz, T.H.; Gauthreaux, S.A.J.; Hristov, N.I.; Horn, J.W.; Jones, G.; Kalko, E.K.V.; Larkin, R.P.; McCracken, G.F.; Swartz, S.M.; Srygley, R.B.; Dudley, R.; Westbrook, J.K.; Wikelski, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Aeroecology: probing and modeling the aerosphere Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Integrative and Comparative Biology Abbreviated Journal Integr Comp Biol  
  Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 1-11  
  Keywords aeroecology; light; biology  
  Abstract Aeroecology is a discipline that embraces and integrates the domains of atmospheric science, ecology, earth science, geography, computer science, computational biology, and engineering. The unifying concept that underlies this emerging discipline is its focus on the planetary boundary layer, or aerosphere, and the myriad of organisms that, in large part, depend upon this environment for their existence. The aerosphere influences both daily and seasonal movements of organisms, and its effects have both short- and long-term consequences for species that use this environment. The biotic interactions and physical conditions in the aerosphere represent important selection pressures that influence traits such as size and shape of organisms, which in turn facilitate both passive and active displacements. The aerosphere also influences the evolution of behavioral, sensory, metabolic, and respiratory functions of organisms in a myriad of ways. In contrast to organisms that depend strictly on terrestrial or aquatic existence, those that routinely use the aerosphere are almost immediately influenced by changing atmospheric conditions (e.g., winds, air density, precipitation, air temperature), sunlight, polarized light, moon light, and geomagnetic and gravitational forces. The aerosphere has direct and indirect effects on organisms, which often are more strongly influenced than those that spend significant amounts of time on land or in water. Future advances in aeroecology will be made when research conducted by biologists is more fully integrated across temporal and spatial scales in concert with advances made by atmospheric scientists and mathematical modelers. Ultimately, understanding how organisms such as arthropods, birds, and bats aloft are influenced by a dynamic aerosphere will be of importance for assessing, and maintaining ecosystem health, human health, and biodiversity.  
  Address *Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology, Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA; School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK; Department of Experimental Ecology, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069, Ulm, Germany; Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1610, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA; **USDA-ARS, 1500 N. Central Avenue, Sidney, MT 59270, USA; Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; USDA-ARS, 2771 F&B Road, College Station, TX 77845, USA and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton NJ 08544, USA  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1540-7063 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:21669768 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 19  
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Author (up) Lack, L.C.; Gradisar, M.; Van Someren, E.J.W.; Wright, H.R.; Lushington, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The relationship between insomnia and body temperatures Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Sleep Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med Rev  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages 307-317  
  Keywords Human Health; Arousal/physiology; Body Temperature Regulation/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Homeostasis/physiology; Humans; Melatonin/blood; Phototherapy; Skin Temperature/physiology; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/physiopathology/therapy; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/*physiopathology/therapy; Sympathetic Nervous System/physiopathology; Wakefulness/physiology  
  Abstract Sleepiness and sleep propensity are strongly influenced by our circadian clock as indicated by many circadian rhythms, most commonly by that of core body temperature. Sleep is most conducive in the temperature minimum phase, but is inhibited in a “wake maintenance zone” before the minimum phase, and is disrupted in a zone following that phase. Different types of insomnia symptoms have been associated with abnormalities of the body temperature rhythm. Sleep onset insomnia is associated with a delayed temperature rhythm presumably, at least partly, because sleep is attempted during a delayed evening wake maintenance zone. Morning bright light has been used to phase advance circadian rhythms and successfully treat sleep onset insomnia. Conversely, early morning awakening insomnia has been associated with a phase advanced temperature rhythm and has been successfully treated with the phase delaying effects of evening bright light. Sleep maintenance insomnia has been associated not with a circadian rhythm timing abnormality, but with nocturnally elevated core body temperature. Combination of sleep onset and maintenance insomnia has been associated with a 24-h elevation of core body temperature supporting the chronic hyper-arousal model of insomnia. The possibility that these last two types of insomnia may be related to impaired thermoregulation, particularly a reduced ability to dissipate body heat from distal skin areas, has not been consistently supported in laboratory studies. Further studies of thermoregulation are needed in the typical home environment in which the insomnia is most evident.  
  Address School of Psychology, Flinders University, South Australia, Australia. leon.lack@flinders.edu.au  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1087-0792 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:18603220 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 775  
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