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Author (up) Allema, A.B.; Rossing, A.H.; van der Werf, W.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Bukovinszky, T.; Steingröver, E.; van Lenteren, C.
Title Effect of light quality on movement of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Journal of Applied Entomology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 136 Issue 10 Pages 793–800
Keywords Animals; insects; movement activity; movement behaviour; movement speed; red light sensitivity; resting behaviour
Abstract Behaviour of nocturnal insects is routinely observed under red light, but it is unclear how the behaviour under red light compares to behaviour in complete darkness, or under a source of white light. Here, we measure movement behaviour of the nocturnal carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius Illiger (Coleoptera: Carabidae) using camera recording under a near-infrared (nir), red or white radiation source. Red light significantly reduced movement speed in females similar to the effect of white light and different from nir. Also movement activity and pause length were affected by radiation source, with a significant difference between nir and white light, and with intermediate values in red light. The results presented here indicate that P. melanarius has different movement behaviour under the three radiation sources and suggest that nir rather than red radiation is most appropriate for measuring behaviour in total darkness. However, in the field total darkness is rare both because of natural light sources such as the moon and stars but increasingly also because of ecological light pollution, and therefore red light may still be of use for observing ecologically and practically relevant natural night-time behaviour.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 385
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Author (up) Almeida, D.N.; Fumega, J.M.-G.
Title How can planning for sustainability improve Costa de Caparica's nightlife? Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication International Journal of Urban Sustainable Development Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Urban Sustainable Development
Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 111-123
Keywords Economics
Abstract In the twentieth century, several transformations occurred in the way society used and perceived urban lighting. This allowed the growth of leisure and other activities related to free time and culture into the night period. Night gained an increasing importance among urban policies and therefore required to be framed within these complex urban contexts as well as other planning processes. This article addresses the Polis Program and its contribution to the improvement of Costa de Caparica's nightlife. It aims to analyse the urban renewal intervention of the Polis Program at Costa de Caparica in terms of night economy and sustainability concerns, in light of Egan's sustainable communities' components. The argument is that the planning of night can contribute to the construction of a sustainable community. The main conclusions focus on the importance that should have been given to governance, public participation and equity components of Egan's wheel along the implementation of the programme, as well as in planning processes broadly, towards achieving a sustainable nightlife.
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ISSN 1946-3138 ISBN Medium
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 434
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Author (up) Andreić , Ž.; Andreić , D.; Pavlić , K.
Title Near infrared light pollution measurements in Croatian sites. Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Geofizika Abbreviated Journal
Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 143 - 156
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract We investigate the light pollution (lP) in the near-infrared (NIR) part of the electromagnetic spectrum (700–1000 nm) for sites at low altitude, as typical for small observatories in this region. Our measurements show that considerable light pollution exists in the NIR. The increase of night sky brightness towards the horizon is often slightly slower in the NIR than in the visible. In cases when lP is mostly produced by high-pressure sodium lamps, the NIR part of light pollution is dominated by two close sodium spectral lines (818.3 and 819.5 nm) that can easily be filtered out with a dedicated filter. This can, however, change as sodium lamps are gradually replaced by metal-halide lamps whose spectra are complex, showing many lines over the whole visible/infrared range. If in the future a change to lED light sources happens, lP in the NIR could be reduced drastically. last, but not least, the low altitude of observing sites, together with climate characteristics of the region, result in a lot more humidity and aerosols in the atmosphere, compared to a typical mountaintop observatory site. This, combined with proximity of the polluting sources to the observing sites, results in enhancing the lP, compared to the clear, dry atmospheric conditions of a mountaintop observatory.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 542
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Author (up) Anisimov, V.N.; Vinogradova, I.A.; Panchenko, A.V.; Popovich, I.G.; Zabezhinskii, M.A.
Title Light-at-Night-Induced Circadian Disruption, Cancer and Aging Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Current Aging Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 170-177
Keywords Animals; Light-at-night; aging; cancer; cardiovascular diseases; circadian; circadian rhythm; diabetes; disruption; melatonin; shift-work
Abstract Light-at-night has become an increasing and essential part of the modern lifestyle and leads to a number of health problems, including excessive body mass index, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Working Group concluded that “shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A) [1]. According to the circadian disruption hypothesis, light-at-night might disrupt the endogenous circadian rhythm and specifically suppress nocturnal production of the pineal hormone melatonin and its secretion into the blood. We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span, and spontaneous and chemical carcinogenesis in rodents. Exposure to constant illumination was followed by accelerated aging and enhanced spontaneous tumorigenesis in female CBA and transgenic HER-2/neu mice. In male and female rats maintained at various light/dark regimens (standard 12:12 light/dark [LD], the natural light [NL] of northwestern Russia, constant light [LL], and constant darkness [DD]) from the age of 25 days until natural death, it was found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated age-related switch-off of the estrous function (in females), induced development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, and shortened life span both in male and females rats compared to the standard LD regimen. Melatonin given in nocturnal drinking water prevented the adverse effect of the constant illumination (LL) and natural light (NL) regimens on the homeostasis, life span, and tumor development both in mice and rats. The exposure to the LL regimen accelerated colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats, whereas the treatment with melatonin alleviated the effects of LL. The maintenance of rats at the DD regimen inhibited DMH-induced carcinogenesis. The LL regimen accelerated, whereas the DD regimen inhibited both mammary carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosomethylurea and transplacental carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosoethylurea in rats. Treatment with melatonin prevented premature aging and tumorigenesis in rodents. The data found in the literature and our observations suggest that the use of melatonin would be effective for cancer prevention in humans at risk as a result of light pollution.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 377
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Author (up) Arendt, J.
Title Biological rhythms during residence in polar regions Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 379-394
Keywords *Acclimatization; Activities of Daily Living; Affect; Antarctic Regions; Arctic Regions; *Biological Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; *Cold Climate; *Cold Temperature; Energy Metabolism; Feeding Behavior; Humans; Melatonin/metabolism; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling; *Photoperiod; Seasonal Affective Disorder/physiopathology/prevention & control/psychology; *Seasons; Sleep; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/etiology/physiopathology/*prevention & control/psychology; Time Factors; Workload; Workplace
Abstract At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 x 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with “normal” working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75 degrees S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within a week, in contrast to temperate zones where complete adaptation rarely occurs. A similar situation occurs on high-latitude North Sea oil installations, especially when working 18:00-06:00 h. Lack of conflicting light exposure (and “social obligations”) is the probable explanation. Many have problems returning to day work, showing circadian desynchrony. Timed light treatment again has helped to restore normal phase/sleep in a small number of people. Postprandial response to meals is compromised during periods of desynchrony with evidence of insulin resistance and elevated triglycerides, risk factors for heart disease. Only small numbers of subjects have been studied intensively in polar regions; however, these observations suggest that suboptimal light conditions are deleterious to health. They apply equally to people living in temperate zones with insufficient light exposure.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK. arendtjo@gmail.com
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:22497433; PMCID:PMC3793275 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 143
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