|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Ruhtz, T.; Lindemann, C.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F.
Title Two camera system for measurement of urban uplight angular distribution Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication AIP Conf. Proc Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1531 Issue 568 Pages
Keywords Instrumentiation
Abstract (down) The angular distribution function of light emitted from cities is unknown, and represents the most important systematic error in skyglow simulations. We describe a method for measuring this distribution using a two camera system mounted on an aerial platform. We present preliminary results from a test flight using such a system, taken over the city of Berlin on July 14, 2011.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 467
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E.
Title Adverse health effects of nighttime lighting: comments on American Medical Association policy statement Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication American Journal of Preventive Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Prev Med
Volume 45 Issue 3 Pages 343-346
Keywords American Medical Association; Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; DNA Damage/physiology; *Health Policy; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; United States
Abstract (down) The American Medical Association House of Delegates in June of 2012 adopted a policy statement on nighttime lighting and human health. This major policy statement summarizes the scientific evidence that nighttime electric light can disrupt circadian rhythms in humans and documents the rapidly advancing understanding from basic science of how disruption of circadian rhythmicity affects aspects of physiology with direct links to human health, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and metabolism. The human evidence is also accumulating, with the strongest epidemiologic support for a link of circadian disruption from light at night to breast cancer. There are practical implications of the basic and epidemiologic science in the form of advancing lighting technologies that better accommodate human circadian rhythmicity.
Address University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0749-3797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23953362 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 130
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Davies, Thomas W; Bennie, Jonathan; Inger, Richard; Hempel de Ibarra, Natalie; Gaston, Kevin J
Title Artificial light pollution: are shifting spectral signatures changing the balance of species interactions? Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Global Change Biologyology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 19 Issue 5 Pages 1417-1423
Keywords animals; ecosystems; species interaction; human vision
Abstract (down) Technological developments in municipal lighting are altering the spectral characteristics of artificially lit habitats. Little is yet known of the biological consequences of such changes, although a variety of animal behaviours are dependent on detecting the spectral signature of light reflected from objects. Using previously published wavelengths of peak visual pigment absorbance, we compared how four alternative street lamp technologies affect the visual abilities of 213 species of arachnid, insect, bird, reptile and mammal by producing different wavelength ranges of light to which they are visually sensitive. The proportion of the visually detectable region of the light spectrum emitted by each lamp was compared to provide an indication of how different technologies are likely to facilitate visually guided behaviours such as detecting objects in the environment. Compared to narrow spectrum lamps, broad spectrum technologies enable animals to detect objects that reflect light over more of the spectrum to which they are sensitive and, importantly, create greater disparities in this ability between major taxonomic groups. The introduction of broad spectrum street lamps could therefore alter the balance of species interactions in the artificially lit environment.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1584
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chang, A.-M.; Scheer, F.A.J.L.; Czeisler, C.A.; Aeschbach, D.
Title Direct effects of light on alertness, vigilance, and the waking electroencephalogram in humans depend on prior light history Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep
Volume 36 Issue 8 Pages 1239-1246
Keywords Arousal/*radiation effects; Attention/radiation effects; Cross-Over Studies; *Electroencephalography; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/blood/physiology; Psychomotor Performance/radiation effects; Reaction Time; Wakefulness/*radiation effects; Young Adult; Light history; alertness and performance; light exposure
Abstract (down) STUDY OBJECTIVES: Light can induce an acute alerting response in humans; however, it is unknown whether the magnitude of this response is simply a function of the absolute illuminance of the light itself, or whether it depends on illuminance history preceding the stimulus. Here, we compared the effects of illuminance history on the alerting response to a subsequent light stimulus. DESIGN: A randomized, crossover design was used to compare the effect of two illuminance histories (1 lux vs. 90 lux) on the alerting response to a 6.5-h 90-lux light stimulus during the biological night. SETTING: Intensive Physiologic Monitoring Unit, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen healthy young adults (6 F; 23.5 +/- 2.9 years). INTERVENTIONS: Participants were administered two 6.5-h light exposures (LE) of 90 lux during the biological night. For 3 days prior to each LE, participants were exposed to either 1 lux or 90 lux during the wake episode. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: The alerting response to light was assessed using subjective sleepiness ratings, lapses of attention, and reaction times as measured with an auditory psychomotor vigilance task, as well as power density in the delta/theta range of the waking EEG. The alerting response to light was greater and lasted longer when the LE followed exposure to 1 lux compared to 90 lux light. CONCLUSION: The magnitude and duration of the alerting effect of light at night depends on the illuminance history and appears to be subject to sensitization and adaptation.
Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. amchang@rics.bwh.harvard.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23904684; PMCID:PMC3700721 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 145
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hsu, F.-C.; Elvidge, C.D.; Matsuno, Y.
Title Exploring and estimating in-use steel stocks in civil engineering and buildings from night-time lights Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 34 Issue 2 Pages 490-504
Keywords architecture; engineering; light at night
Abstract (down) Steel is the most widely used metal in the world, and numerous studies have investigated its stock and flow. Two basic methods for analysing material flow and accounting for stock are the top-down and bottom-up approaches. Their applicability, however, largely depends on data availability. To overcome this limitation, we have contemplated using satellite imagery as a proxy for missing data. In a previous study, we confirmed the correlation between night-time light radiance and civil engineering/building in-use steel stocks in Japan. In this study, the scope of the investigation was expanded to a global scale, examining correlations in different regions of the world. We found that night-time light radiance and in-use steel stocks have region-specific linear correlations, which are influenced by construction styles, which in turn depend on climate, seismic activity, cultural preferences, etc. The results were then applied to countries in the various regions whose in-use steel stocks were previously unreported. This technique produced an estimate of the global civil engineering/building in-use steel stock of around 9 × 109 tonnes (9 Gt), with 1.24 Gt being previously unreported. As a further step, this study shows the spatial distribution of civil engineering/building in-use steel stock in each region.
Address Department of Materials Engineering , Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo , Tokyo , 113-8656 , Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 210
Permanent link to this record